A Clockwork Orange

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F. Alexander Character Analysis

A writer who lives in the cottage called HOME that Alex and his droogs break into, proceeding then to rape and murder his wife. Later, F. Alexander unknowingly takes Alex in after Alex coincidentally returns to his home to seek help. F. Alexander is writing a book called A Clockwork Orange, which is an activist polemic against Reclamation Therapy. When he discovers that Alex was responsible for the rape and murder of his wife, he is determined to harm Alex and ends up imprisoned himself.

F. Alexander Quotes in A Clockwork Orange

The A Clockwork Orange quotes below are all either spoken by F. Alexander or refer to F. Alexander. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Language Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the W. W. Norton & Company edition of A Clockwork Orange published in 1995.
Part 3, Chapter 4 Quotes

You’ve sinned, I suppose, but your punishment has been out of all proportion. They have turned you into something other than a human being. You have no power of choice any longer. You are committed to socially acceptable acts, a little machine capable only of good. And I see that clearly—that business about the marginal conditionings. Music and the sexual act, literature and art, all must be a source now not of pleasure but of pain.

Related Characters: F. Alexander (speaker), Alex
Page Number: 174
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Alex ends up back in the house that he broke into in the first part of the novel. The house's owner, F. Alexander, recognizes that Alex must have been a dangerous criminal, but doesn't realize that Alex was the very man who raped and (unknowingly) murdered his wife.

Ironically, F. Alexander acts as Alex's protector, delivering a long speech in which he criticizes the government for depriving Alex of his free will--something far more precious than a lower crime rate. Alexander, an artist, is especially moved that Alex has been conditioned to despise music of all kinds--as Alexander sees it, Alex's newfound hatred of music is proof of the barbarism of his scientific conditioning. The question now becomes: what will Alexander do when he discovers that Alex was the man who killed his wife? In other words, does Alexander really value Alex's free will more highly than Alex's ability to commit crimes, when such crimes become intimately personal to Alexander's experience?

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F. Alexander Character Timeline in A Clockwork Orange

The timeline below shows where the character F. Alexander appears in A Clockwork Orange. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 3, Chapter 5
Language Theme Icon
Free Will vs. the “Clockwork Orange” Theme Icon
Conformism Theme Icon
...figure out the man’s name. Upon reading a copy, Alex discovers the man is named F. Alexander . The book itself is an impassioned polemic against the government’s attempts to mechanize citizens,... (full context)
Language Theme Icon
Sadism and Society Theme Icon
Free Will vs. the “Clockwork Orange” Theme Icon
Alex comes downstairs for breakfast, and F. Alexander explains that he has been up for hours making phone calls. Alex remarks that he... (full context)
Language Theme Icon
Sadism and Society Theme Icon
Free Will vs. the “Clockwork Orange” Theme Icon
Conformism Theme Icon
Three of F. Alexander ’s political allies come to the house to meet Alex. Alex greets them in typical... (full context)
Language Theme Icon
Sadism and Society Theme Icon
Free Will vs. the “Clockwork Orange” Theme Icon
Conformism Theme Icon
F. Alexander fixates on the word “dim” and recalls that it sounds like a familiar name. Alex... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 6
Language Theme Icon
Sadism and Society Theme Icon
Free Will vs. the “Clockwork Orange” Theme Icon
Conformism Theme Icon
...chaplain, who reveals that he has left the penal system to preach on his own. F. Alexander ’s cohorts also arrive to triumphantly tell Alex that his actions have ruined the government’s... (full context)
Language Theme Icon
Sadism and Society Theme Icon
Free Will vs. the “Clockwork Orange” Theme Icon
Art and Humanity Theme Icon
Conformism Theme Icon
...and explains that the real people who sought to harm Alex were the ones like F. Alexander , who tried to use the boy as a political tool. The Minister goes on... (full context)