A Passage to India

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Cyril Fielding Character Analysis

The English principal of the government college. Fielding is an independent, open-minded man who likes to “travel light.” He believes in educating the Indians and treats them like his peers, which separates him from the other British expats who tend to be more condescending to the Indians. Fielding befriends Aziz and later, after Aziz has been accused of attacking Adela, joins his defense team. In doing so, Fielding renounces his English compatriots. Fielding goes on to marry Stella Moore.

Cyril Fielding Quotes in A Passage to India

The A Passage to India quotes below are all either spoken by Cyril Fielding or refer to Cyril Fielding. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Colonialism Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Harcourt Brace Jovanovich edition of A Passage to India published in 1984.
Part 1, Chapter 7 Quotes

The world, he believed, is a globe of men who are trying to reach one another and can best do so by the help of goodwill plus culture and intelligence – a creed ill suited to Chandrapore, but he had come out too late to lose it. He had no racial feeling; not because he was superior to his brother civilians, but because he had matured in a different atmosphere, where the herd instinct does not flourish.

Related Characters: Cyril Fielding
Page Number: 65
Explanation and Analysis:

In this chapter, we're introduced to one of the most sympathetic characters in the novel, Cyril Fielding. Cyril is unique among the English character insofar as he seems not to think in racial terms--he doesn't look down on his Indian neighbors in any way, since he wasn't brought up to be a competitive, nationalistic person. Cyril is an educator, and his emphasis on education leads him to see Indians as the equals of Englishmen. In a harsh, militaristic state, dominated by the English military presence, Cyril's character is an anomaly, suggesting that the world of education, international experience, and individual friendship is gentler and more equitable than the world of colonialism. England is an intensely proud, competitive country, but there are ways to be English and avoid racism. In general, Fielding is presented as Forster's stand-in: an Englishman with an open mind and good intentions, but who is nonetheless trapped within the evils of the colonial system and the cultural differences between himself and the Indians.

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“I do so hate mysteries,” Adela announced.
“We English do.”
“I dislike them not because I’m English, but from my own personal point of view,” she corrected.
“I like mysteries but I rather dislike muddles,” said Mrs. Moore.
“A mystery is a muddle.”
“Oh, do you think so, Mr. Fielding?”
“A mystery is only a high-sounding term for a muddle. No advantage in stirring it up, in either case. Aziz and I know well that India’s a muddle.”

Related Characters: Cyril Fielding (speaker), Adela Quested (speaker), Mrs. Moore (speaker)
Page Number: 73
Explanation and Analysis:

In this famous passage, the characters discuss the differences between mysteries and muddles as it applies to the Indian world. Mrs. Moore seems to think of India as a mystery--that is to say, a problem with a potential solution, or something chaotic and confusing but with an underlying meaning to it. Fielding and Aziz (and often Forster himself) see India as more of a "muddle"--something chaotic and confusing but without an underlying meaning. This idea of the nature of the unknown as either mystery or muddle is crucial to the book, both in its "ethnographic" aspect (how to define and describe a place as vast and diverse as India) and in its dealings with spirituality, psychology, and the human experience.

Part 1, Chapter 11 Quotes

But they were friends, brothers. That part was settled, their compact had been subscribed by the photograph, they trusted one another, affection had triumphed for once in a way.

Related Characters: Dr. Aziz, Cyril Fielding
Page Number: 132
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, from the end of Part One of the novel, the characters make an important breakthrough. Much of the book is concerned with how individuals can become friends and achieve a sincere connection even across divides of culture and oppression. This idea is explored most potently in the two protagonists, Aziz and Fielding. At this point in the novel, it seems that an Englishman and an Indian can be true friends--after this meeting and exchange of trust and affection, Fielding and Aziz feel like "brothers." But as Forster comments rather ominously, this is an exception, not a rule, and even in this seemingly idyllic new friendship affection has only triumphed over division "for once" and only "in a way."

Part 2, Chapter 17 Quotes

He had not gone mad at the phrase “an English girl fresh from England,” he had not rallied to the banner of race. He was still after facts, though the herd had decided on emotion. Nothing enrages Anglo-India more than the lantern of reason if it is exhibited for one moment after its extinction is decreed. All over Chandrapore that day the Europeans were putting aside their normal personalities and sinking themselves in their community. Pity, wrath, heroism, filled them, but the power of putting two and two together was annihilated.

Related Characters: Cyril Fielding
Page Number: 183
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Adela has been supposedly attacked while in the Marabar Caves, and Aziz has been accused of assaulting her. The incident is a political and racial one: the Indians support Aziz, and the English people support Adela. The incident brings out the worst in some people--Turton, for example, who's previously been shown to be a racist, intolerant person, treats the incident as a chance to express some of his strong anti-Indian sentiments to Fielding. Turton is annoyed that Fielding refuses to play along with the rest of the English. Instead of allowing his nationalistic sympathies to run away with him, Fielding remains calm and factual with the case. The majority of Englishmen, however, ignore the facts--and temporarily lose their ability to even process facts--in their sudden rush of nationalistic, paternalistic, racist sentiment. 

Part 2, Chapter 29 Quotes

“Our letter is a failure for a simple reason which we had better face: you have no real affection for Aziz, or Indians generally.” She assented. “The first time I saw you, you were wanting to see India, not Indians, and it occurred to me: Ah, that won’t take us far. Indians know whether they are liked or not – they cannot be fooled here. Justice never satisfies them, and that is why the British Empire rests on sand.”

Related Characters: Cyril Fielding (speaker), Dr. Aziz, Adela Quested
Page Number: 288-289
Explanation and Analysis:

Adela feels terrible for what she's done to Aziz: by accusing him of assault, she risked his life. Adela tries to apologize to Aziz by writing a letter to him--and yet when she reads her own letter, she decides that it seems flat and insincere. Fielding explains why Adela's writing seems to insincere: it is. This reinforces the idea of the previous passage--that Adela is technically doing the right thing, but she isn't doing out of love or compassion. She doesn't genuinely love Aziz, or any other Indian for that matter--they remain strange and foreign to her, perhaps not totally human, even though in her mind she is trying to be just towards them.

Fielding shows himself to be a keen observer of Indian culture (at least according to Forster's similar observations): he recognizes that Indian people are more honest and open with each other--unlike the English, they don't go through the motions of pretending to be polite to one another; if they don't like each other, they say so. Fielding hints that there will always be a void between India and England because the English think that a formal code of right and wrong can replace the Indians' more instinctive, automatic modes of morality and communication. Neither worldview is inherently better or worse--they're just different--but the problem arises when one system of morality and humanity is externally forced upon the other, as is the case in the colonial system.

Perhaps life is a mystery, not a muddle; they could not tell. Perhaps the hundred Indias which fuss and squabble so tiresomely are one, and the universe they mirror is one.

Related Characters: Cyril Fielding, Adela Quested
Page Number: 293
Explanation and Analysis:

In this critical passage, Adela and Cyril discuss the mysteries of India and the universe, reiterating a conversation they had earlier. Both characters are atheists, and yet they want to believe that there is some kind of higher purpose in life--they can't be satisfied with the belief that all of life is random and chaotic (a muddle, rather than a mystery).

If life is just a muddle, then it has no higher purpose. If, however, it is a mystery, then it has a solution and therefore a meaning. Adela has been deeply disturbed by the events of the trial--they've reminded her how deep the divisions in English and Indian society go. Adela wants to believe that Indians and Englishmen have something in common; by the same token, she wants to believe that all people (and perhaps all living things) are united together beneath the muddle of their lives.

Part 2, Chapter 32 Quotes

He had forgotten the beauty of form among idol temples and lumpy hills; indeed, without form, how can there be beauty? Form stammered here and there in a mosque, became rigid through nervousness even; but oh these Italian churches! …something more precious than mosaics and marbles was offered to him now: the harmony between the works of man and the earth that upholds them, the civilization that has escaped muddle, the spirit in a reasonable form, with flesh and blood subsisting.

Related Characters: Cyril Fielding
Page Number: 313-314
Explanation and Analysis:

In this chapter, Fielding travels back to Europe, where he marvels at the beauty of Venetian churches and other buildings. Fielding has been out of Europe for a long time, but when he returns he's immediately struck by the order and control of European society--an order that Indian society might lack. In Fielding's view, India lacks structure and "form" altogether.

What does Forster mean by form, exactly? Fielding is looking at architecture, but Forster is talking about the land itself as well, and about the vague structure of society. Part of Forster's description of India as "muddle" or "mystery" includes the assumption that India is inherently confusing, chaotic, and formless. The buildings lack symmetry and design, and even the land itself is somehow inhuman and "muddled" (one thinks of the elaborate descriptions of the meaningless, somehow horrifying Marabar Hills). In Europe, however, the geography is easier for the human mind to comprehend, and the architecture reflects that--it has meaning and design, and is comforting or inspiring to behold.

Forster here betrays a Eurocentric prejudice, something he usually tries to avoid. He isn't saying that Europeans are superior to Indians, but he does suggest that an entire aspect of geography, architecture, and society is more beautiful and "human" in Europe than in India. Structure is better than formlessness--harmony is better than discord. And Forster sees structure and harmony as more present in Europe than in India, whatever the sins or virtues of the people themselves.

Part 3, Chapter 35 Quotes

“I do not want you, I do not want one of you in my private life, with my dying breath I say it. Yes, yes, I made a foolish blunder; despise me and feel cold. I thought you married my enemy. I never read your letter. Mahmoud Ali deceived me… I forgive Mahmoud Ali all things, because he loved me.” Then pausing, while the rain exploded like pistols, he said: “My heart is for my own people henceforward.”

Related Characters: Dr. Aziz (speaker), Cyril Fielding, Mahmoud Ali
Page Number: 339
Explanation and Analysis:

In this dramatic passage, Aziz reunites with his old friend Fielding. Years have passed, and the two have grown apart. Now, Aziz is angry with Fielding--Aziz long ago turned his back on English culture altogether. In this scene, Aziz learns that Fielding is not, as Aziz had assumed, married to Adela; Aziz's "friend" Mahmoud Ali had lied about the truth to Aziz in order to ensure that Aziz didn't reconcile with either Adela or Fielding.

In spite of his mistake, Aziz refuses to embrace Englishmen once again. Instead of being angry with Ali for lying to him for so long, Aziz insists that he forgives his friend and recognizes that Mahmoud Ali lied out of love more than anything else. Aziz has brushed with the English too many times before--from now on, he's going to stay with his own Indian people. Thus Forster again portrays the complications of humanism, psychology, and culture--Aziz's new sense of nationalism is vital, and in many ways healthy for him, but it also stands in the way of one of his most important friendships, and the central relationship of the novel: the bond between Aziz and Fielding.

Part 3, Chapter 37 Quotes

“Clear out, all you Turtons and Burtons. We wanted to know you ten years back – now it’s too late. If we see you and sit on your committees it’s for political reasons, don’t you make any mistake.” His horse did rear. “Clear out, clear out, I say. Why are we put to so much suffering? We used to blame you, now we blame ourselves, we grow wiser. Until England is in difficulties we keep silent, but in the next European war – aha, aha! Then is our time.”

Related Characters: Dr. Aziz (speaker), Cyril Fielding, Mr. Turton, Mrs. Turton
Page Number: 360
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Aziz predicts that one day, India will rise and claim independence for itself. Much as Ireland rebelled against the U.K. during World War One, Aziz predicts that India will seize a moment of international crisis to stand up for its own independence; then, it will drive out all the Englishmen in the country and take control of its government.

Aziz's remarks (and thus Forster's as well) predict the future. In 1947, more than 20 years after A Passage to India's publication, India would rise up against the British Empire, using the crisis of World War II as an opportunity to fight for freedom. Aziz's remarks seem both selfless and self-absorbed--even though he's making a great speech about the future of his country, and rhetorically throwing off the yoke of colonialism, he's also clearly using politics as a way of lashing out against all the individual English people who have caused him pain and misery over the course of the novel. In doing so, he is again trying to reject Fielding and his offers of friendship.

“…yes, we shall drive every blasted Englishman into the sea, and then” – he rode against him furiously – “and then,” he concluded, half kissing him, “you and I shall be friends.”
“Why can’t we be friends now?” said the other, holding him affectionately. “It’s want I want. It’s what you want.”
But the horses didn’t want it – they swerved apart; the earth didn’t want it, sending up rocks through which riders must pass single file; the temples, the tank, the jail, the palace, the birds, the carrion, the Guest House… they didn’t want it, they said in their hundred voices: “No, not yet,” and the sky said: “No, not there.”

Related Characters: Dr. Aziz (speaker), Cyril Fielding (speaker)
Page Number: 362
Explanation and Analysis:

The novel ends on a cautiously optimistic note. Aziz cannot be true friends with Fielding in the present, despite the fact that they both like (and even love) each other, and have always had a strong bond. True friendship, Forster suggests, never exists in a vacuum, and the specter of colonialism (and cultural differences) still stands in the way of Aziz and Fielding's personal admiration for each other. Put another way, Aziz cannot be friends with Cyril until there's a more equitable relationship between England and India--until both men feel free, and one is not inherently connected to the oppressor, and the other to the oppressed. Only then can the two men get along without all the political baggage of their respective countries.

Forster believes in the possibility of humanistic cooperation between people of different nations, and indeed feels that individual friendship is crucial to overcoming racism, prejudice, and injustice in general (friendship is the most important kind of human connection in the novel, and is central to Forster's humanistic views). Yet Forster also tempers any kind of idealized optimism with an acceptance of the realities of politics and culture, tabling such personal cooperation until the day that two nations themselves can get along and exist as equals. Cyril and Aziz are representatives of their countries, proving that no man can be truly free of his culture and nation. The tragedy of the novel is that friendship has its limits: even when they're trying to be friendly and kind, people find themselves bound to and divided by their own societies--and even their geographies and natural surroundings. Even the horses, birds, and sky--not just the human elements of culture and society--divide Aziz and Fielding in this scene. One day, Englishmen and Indians will be able to get along, but not yet.

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Cyril Fielding Character Timeline in A Passage to India

The timeline below shows where the character Cyril Fielding appears in A Passage to India. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 1, Chapter 3
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...a foreign land. After the song Adela again asks to see the “real India.” Cyril Fielding, the principal of the Government College, passes through the room and suggests that Adela should... (full context)
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...then leave the club, with Mrs. Turton thinking that she doesn’t like Adela or Mr. Fielding, because they aren’t “pukka” (respectable) enough. (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 5
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...side, most of the men are grateful to be invited, but for different reasons. Cyril Fielding is at the party, and he wanders about socializing with the Indians. He even stays... (full context)
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Mr. Fielding finds Adela and tells her that the Indians appreciated her kindness. He invites Adela and... (full context)
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...this will be almost impossible unless she has allies. She thinks sympathetically of someone like Fielding. Miss Derek, the dinner guest, works for a Maharaja, a native Indian ruler who is... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 6
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...say. He is pleased to find that it is an invitation to tea from Mr. Fielding. Aziz is especially pleased because Fielding has overlooked the fact that Aziz had forgotten another... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 7
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Cyril Fielding didn’t come to India until he was forty. He has traveled to many places and... (full context)
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Fielding has no “racial feeling,” and believes that the people of all countries are just “trying... (full context)
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Aziz arrives at Fielding’s house for tea as Fielding is still getting dressed. Fielding invites Aziz to “make himself... (full context)
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Fielding tells Aziz that Mrs. Moore and Adela are coming to tea as well, and Aziz... (full context)
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...“I do so hate mysteries.” Mrs. Moore says that she likes mysteries, but dislikes “muddles.” Fielding responds that all of India is a muddle. Aziz doesn’t comment, but invites the ladies... (full context)
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Aziz starts getting emotional talking about justice and kindness, and he waxes poetic about architecture. Fielding knows that some of Aziz’s facts are wrong, but unlike someone like Ronny or Turton,... (full context)
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Fielding’s fourth guest arrives: Professor Godbole, a Hindu Brahman. Professor Godbole is quiet and elderly, and... (full context)
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Mrs. Moore asks to see the college grounds, and Fielding takes her for a tour. Aziz, Adela, and Professor Godbole remain. Adela mentions coming to... (full context)
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...excitable and talkative, and everyone in the room is uncomfortable or angry by the time Fielding returns with Mrs. Moore. (full context)
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Ronny takes Fielding aside and scolds him for leaving Adela alone with the Indians. Fielding doesn’t see anything... (full context)
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When the song is over Fielding asks for an explanation of the song. Professor Godbole responds that in the song the... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 8
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...she now finds his “self-complacency” and “lack of subtlety” off-putting. As they ride away from Fielding’s, she grows more and more irritated at him for his rudeness to the Indians. She... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 9
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...stays in bed musing about life and the nature of Indians. He longs to see Fielding again, but would be ashamed if Fielding were to see his shabby home. Aziz finds... (full context)
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...young nephew. Rafi says that Professor Godbole has also gotten sick after having tea with Fielding, and all the visitors briefly consider the possibility that Fielding poisoned them. They then grow... (full context)
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...Muhammed, who is Rafi’s uncle, and the two men soon start yelling at each other. Fielding enters the room unnoticed in the middle of the argument. When the Indian men realize... (full context)
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...sure Rafi is still comfortable after being scolded. The men soon start talking familiarly with Fielding, and they discuss religion. They are shocked to hear that Fielding doesn’t believe in God.... (full context)
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The Indians enjoy being familiar with Fielding, and Fielding is intoxicated with his own candor and honesty in speaking to them. He... (full context)
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...finally breaks up, as Dr. Panna Lal has other appointments. All the visitors file out. Fielding is slightly disappointed by his visit, and he is reminded of how the Englishmen at... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 11
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Fielding stands on the porch and prepares to leave, but the servant won’t bring him his... (full context)
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Aziz says that he admires Fielding because Fielding treats all men like brothers, which is beyond the character of most people.... (full context)
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Fielding seems to accept that he will never be intimate with anyone, and decides that he... (full context)
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Aziz half-jokingly suggests that Fielding should marry Adela, but Fielding is horrified by the idea, and calls her a “prig.”... (full context)
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Aziz agrees that Adela is not right for Fielding, but he mostly disapproves of her for her lack of beauty. He then remembers his... (full context)
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Fielding admits that his frankness has gotten him into trouble before, but he doesn’t really mind.... (full context)
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Fielding prepares to leave again, and Aziz admits to him that he had given his servant... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 13
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Aziz goes through a great amount of trouble inviting Mrs. Moore, Adela, Fielding, and Professor Godbole – as he wants to recreate the company of the tea party.... (full context)
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...everyone should be treated on the trip, but then the train suddenly starts – before Fielding and Professor Godbole have arrived. They appear in their car and run towards the train.... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 14
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...and he grows emotional with thoughts of hospitality. He considers Mrs. Moore (and the absent Fielding) his closest friends, and is proud to have earned their friendship. He starts to speak... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 16
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...them in his pocket. Aziz returns to the camp, and is delighted to see that Fielding is there, having arrived in Miss Derek’s car. Aziz gets Fielding a drink, and they... (full context)
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...left to drive back to Chandrapore. Aziz is disappointed but still happy about the picnic. Fielding, however, senses that something has gone wrong, and guesses that Adela has requested to drive... (full context)
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...story of the past hour without even realizing that he is being untruthful. He tells Fielding that he was with Adela when she saw Miss Derek’s car and decided to run... (full context)
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Fielding worries that Aziz has been insulted by the women, but Aziz is still ecstatic about... (full context)
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...he is under arrest. Aziz panics and tries to run out a different door, sobbing. Fielding catches him and tries to calm him down, warning him to not “act the criminal.”... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 17
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Mr. Turton calls Fielding into a waiting room, where he informs him that Adela has been “insulted” (probably sexually... (full context)
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Fielding withdraws his remark about Adela, but continues to protest that Aziz must be innocent. Turton,... (full context)
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Turton tells Fielding that there is to be an informal meeting at the English club that night to... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 18
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Fielding arrives and McBryde gives him all the details of the case. Adela claimed that Aziz... (full context)
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Fielding asks to see Adela, but McBryde says she is too upset and sick. Fielding states... (full context)
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Fielding desperately tries to see Adela again, hoping to clear things up before the situation gets... (full context)
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McBryde tries to reach out to Fielding, warning him to “toe the line” and not let his “personal views” separate him from... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 19
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Hamidullah is waiting outside McBryde’s office, and Fielding runs into him as he exits. Fielding is emotional about the case, but Hamidullah remains... (full context)
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...his plans for Aziz’s defense, which includes bringing in a famous anti-British lawyer named Amritrao. Fielding wants to avoid making the situation even more tense, and Hamidullah remarks that the English... (full context)
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Fielding returns to the college, where Professor Godbole approaches him about unrelated college matters. Finally Godbole... (full context)
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Fielding is astounded, and says that he can think about nothing but Aziz at the moment.... (full context)
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Fielding is frustrated by this answer, as he needs “solid ground” to stand on. He accuses... (full context)
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Fielding gains permission to see Aziz that afternoon, but when he visits Aziz is miserable and... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 20
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...the women are gone, Turton addresses the men. He tries to restrain his anger at Fielding and his hatred of the Indians, and he doesn’t want to have to call in... (full context)
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...enters to inform them that Adela is recovering. He seems angry at the sight of Fielding, and tries to bait him by criticizing Aziz and the “Englishman” who accompanied the expedition.... (full context)
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Fielding is angry that so many Indians are being insulted, but he doesn’t let himself be... (full context)
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Turton welcomes Ronny and inquires about Mrs. Moore’s health. The drunk soldier calls out Fielding’s rudeness in staying seated, calling him a “swine.” Fielding takes the opportunity to make a... (full context)
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Fielding exits the club, wishing he hadn’t been rude to Ronny, but glad that he has... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 21
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Fielding rides into Chandrapore to join “his new allies,” the Indians. He hears constant drumbeats and... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 22
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McBryde gives Adela a letter she received from Fielding, which he has already opened. McBryde explains that Fielding has joined Aziz’s side and was... (full context)
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...thing, and Adela is easily convinced. Ronny thinks that she is just remembering words from Fielding’s letter. Ronny checks to make sure no Indian servants have been eavesdropping, and he warns... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 24
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...to starve themselves until Aziz is acquitted. All the English in the room feel like Fielding is behind all the trouble, and they verbally abuse him as a traitor and spy.... (full context)
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...“too much agitated with the defeat of British prestige to be interested.” Adela then sees Fielding in the crowd, with an Indian child sitting on his knee. Das is happier and... (full context)
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McBryde continues with his evidence, arguing that Aziz “duped” many people beforehand, including Fielding, the servant Antony, and the Nawab Bahadur—trying to argue that the crime was premeditated, so... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 25
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...a mass of Indians and carried to the courtroom’s exit. She finds herself next to Fielding, who asks where she is going. She says she doesn’t know, and Fielding warns her... (full context)
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Concerned with her safety, Fielding reluctantly takes Adela to his carriage. He intends for her to ride off and return... (full context)
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The procession winds through town, unsure where to go. The students eventually take Fielding’s carriage to the college, where everything is quiet, but the servants are gone and the... (full context)
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Meanwhile Aziz calls out for Fielding, whom he feels has abandoned him. He takes no joy in his victory, as ever... (full context)
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...will be a celebration at his house that night, and he recruits Hamidullah to find Fielding and Amritrao and invite them. Now that the crowd’s rage has died out, the heat... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 26
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Fielding wakes up to find that he and Adela are still alone at the college. Adela... (full context)
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Adela meekly accepts this possibility, and Fielding lists the options for what actually happened in the cave: Aziz did assault Adela (what... (full context)
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Fielding explains that he thinks Adela’s hallucination was dispelled in court by re-visualizing the incident—that McBryde’s... (full context)
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Adela asks Fielding what Aziz has said about her. Fielding answers awkwardly, remembering how bitterly Aziz has spoken... (full context)
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Hamidullah arrives, overhearing the last part of their discussion. He is displeased to see Fielding and Adela together, and he speaks only to Fielding, refusing to even look at Adela.... (full context)
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Adela plans to go to the Dak Bungalow, a poor lodging place, but Fielding invites her to stay at the college while he is away. Both Hamidullah and Fielding... (full context)
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...arrived outside, disguising himself in a lower-class carriage. Ronny doesn’t want to come inside, so Fielding goes out to meet him. (full context)
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When Fielding returns to fetch Adela, he says that Mrs. Moore has died at sea on the... (full context)
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Hamidullah and Fielding agree not to break the news to Aziz until the next day, so as not... (full context)
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...Adela, looking awkward. Hamidullah is rude to him, questioning him about Mrs. Moore’s death, though Fielding is very polite. Ronny and Fielding decide on the details of Adela’s lodgings, and then... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 27
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...most of the partiers at Aziz’s victory celebration are asleep on the Nawab Bahadur’s roof. Fielding and Aziz talk sleepily, lying side by side on the roof and looking at the... (full context)
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...a while they enjoy the “blessings of leisure,” something which is unfamiliar to Western culture. Fielding is dressed in Indian clothes, but he knows he will always feel awkward and out... (full context)
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...be merciful until he receives an apology, and then he mocks Adela for her ugliness. Fielding cuts off the conversation, saying that Aziz’s sexual snobbery is the one thing about he... (full context)
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Fielding points out that Aziz’s emotions are not “in proportion to their objects”—Aziz praises and loves... (full context)
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...and he presses on in the conversation, wanting to talk more about Mrs. Moore. Finally Fielding cannot put up with the lie anymore, and he tells Aziz that Mrs. Moore has... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 28
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...that she will take the initiative in politely backing out and leaving. She remains at Fielding’s college, an embarrassment to herself and the English, as the Turtons won’t take her back.... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 29
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...for a long time, and holds the “enlightened opinions” of more liberal Englishmen. He congratulates Fielding for his conduct from the start of the whole incident, and tells him that many... (full context)
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The college stays closed for a while, and Fielding eats and sleeps at Hamidullah’s, so Adela continues to live at the college. Fielding comes... (full context)
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...real plan, however, as the true British power remains strong and untroubled by the trial. Fielding and Aziz argue more about plans for the future and about Aziz’s suit against Adela.... (full context)
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Fielding finally starts bringing up Mrs. Moore to shame Aziz about Adela. Aziz was very upset... (full context)
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...to another province, and he visits Adela to break off the engagement. He then tells Fielding, and says that he has arranged for a passage back to England for Adela as... (full context)
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...says that she and Ronny never should have even considered marriage in the first place. Fielding agrees that the whole institution of marriage is “absurd,” and based only on flimsy social... (full context)
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...Adela suggests “telepathy,” but the word seems silly, and Adela retracts it. Both she and Fielding feel that they are wading out of their depth, close to something supernatural and profound... (full context)
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...servant Antony accompanies her and starts a rumor among the boat’s passengers that she was Fielding’s mistress. Adela starts to feel better as the ship approaches Europe, and befriends an American... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 30
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Hamidullah then passes on the rumor that Fielding was having an affair with Adela while she was staying at the college. Aziz makes... (full context)
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...purdah, but they have not followed through yet. For example, they all like and respect Fielding, but none have actually met him. Even Hamidullah’s wife finds an excuse to avoid Fielding... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 31
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Fielding is away at a conference for several days, and while he is gone Aziz muses... (full context)
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Aziz meets Fielding at the station when he returns, and brings up the subject by mentioning that McBryde... (full context)
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Aziz finally tells Fielding the rumor about him, saying that it might injure his reputation. Fielding laughs it off,... (full context)
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Fielding is frustrated by the miscommunications between himself and Aziz. He sees Turton at the post... (full context)
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Fielding then joins Aziz for dinner, and tells him that he is traveling to England soon... (full context)
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Aziz then wants to change the subject back to Fielding’s trip to England, and he asks Fielding if he will visit Adela. Fielding says that... (full context)
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...Westerner’s is hypocrisy. Aziz muses more on his suspicions, and soon finds himself believing that Fielding did indeed have an affair with Adela while she was at the college. (full context)
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...travel with his children back to their home, so that when he returns to Chandrapore Fielding will have already left. Fielding is aware that something is wrong with their friendship, and... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 34
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...Professor is still dancing in religious joy, but he manages to relay the news that Fielding may be at the European guest house. Fielding’s visit is an official one, as he... (full context)
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...avoid them, choosing escape instead of joining committees and protesting British rule. He feels that Fielding has truly betrayed him, and they no longer speak—Fielding’s letters from Europe seemed “cold” to... (full context)
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Since then Aziz has thrown away all of Fielding’s letters, and he feels that this is the end of a “foolish experiment.” He sometimes... (full context)
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That night Aziz arrives home and finds a note from Fielding (passed on by Godbole) saying that Fielding, his wife, and his wife’s brother have arrived.... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 35
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Aziz’s children then notice that Fielding and his brother-in-law are climbing up to visit the saint’s shrine. The children ask if... (full context)
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Fielding immediately asks Aziz why he hasn’t answered his letters, but he is interrupted by a... (full context)
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They reach the carriage, and while helping the Englishmen inside, Aziz addresses Fielding’s brother-in-law as “Mr. Quested.” Fielding is shocked, for he didn’t marry Adela, but instead married... (full context)
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...admits that he was mistaken, but proudly says that he doesn’t care—he still doesn’t want Fielding to visit him while in Mau. Aziz declares that he will stick to his own... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 36
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...guest house himself. Aziz runs into Professor Godbole on the way and tells him about Fielding’s wife. Godbole says that he has known for more than a year that Fielding married... (full context)
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...and looks through the rooms, reading two letters he finds. One is from Ronny to Fielding, which discusses Fielding’s marriage and new problems in India, which Ronny blames on “the Jews.” (full context)
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...reads is from Adela to Stella. He resents the intimate tone of it, and how Fielding, Adela, Stella, Ralph, and Ronny all refer to each other so familiarly, like the English... (full context)
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Suddenly Fielding’s boat collides with Aziz’s boat just as the Hindu ceremony climaxes. Stella shrinks towards Fielding... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 37
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After the “shipwreck,” Aziz and Fielding suddenly find their old friendship and harmony restored, as if the intervening years had never... (full context)
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Aziz and Fielding ride through beautiful jungles and fields, feeling happy. The nature they pass seems almost as... (full context)
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Fielding says that Aziz should talk to Stella or Ralph, as they have some interesting ideas... (full context)
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They then discuss politics. Fielding and Aziz have both grown more politically “hardened” than before, and have differing views, but... (full context)
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...England is in trouble again, then the Indians will take back India. Aziz stumbles when Fielding asks him for details of his plan to drive out the English and unite India,... (full context)
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...generation. And only then, he says, can the two men truly be friends. Aziz and Fielding embrace. Fielding asks why they can’t be friends now, as both of them want it.... (full context)