A Passage to India

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A young Muslim doctor in Chandrapore who is a widower with three children. Aziz is skilled at his job but his real passion is for poetry. He is emotional and effusive, and befriends Fielding, Mrs. Moore, and Adela, growing especially close with Fielding and admiring Mrs. Moore. Later he is accused of assaulting Adela, but is ultimately cleared. After the incident Aziz grows hardened against the British and declares that India should become a united nation. Even when he eventually reconciles with Fielding, he recognizes that there can be no true friendship between them until the British no longer control India and they can interact as equals.

Dr. Aziz Quotes in A Passage to India

The A Passage to India quotes below are all either spoken by Dr. Aziz or refer to Dr. Aziz. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Colonialism Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Harcourt Brace Jovanovich edition of A Passage to India published in 1984.
Part 1, Chapter 2 Quotes

“You understand me, you know what others feel. Oh, if others resembled you!”
Rather surprised, she replied: “I don’t think I understand people very well. I only know whether I like or dislike them.”
“Then you are an Oriental.”

Related Characters: Dr. Aziz (speaker), Mrs. Moore (speaker)
Page Number: 21
Explanation and Analysis:

Forster sets in motion the cultural politics that drive the entire novel. Mrs. Moore, an elderly visitor from England, has come to India. In this scene she steps into a mosque at night, and makes the accidental acquaintance of a young Indian man named Dr. Aziz. Aziz and Mrs. Moore feel an immediate connection. Interestingly, their connection flowers when Mrs. Moore admits that she doesn't feel like she belongs among her English friends: she says that she judges people instinctively and automatically. Aziz claims that doing so makes Moore "an Oriental."

What's going on here? Aziz's pronouncement suggests that there's a fundamental difference between English and Eastern cultures: the English are analytical and reasonable, while the Indians are instinctive, imaginative, and receptive to their own "guts." Of course, one could argue that such a distinction is just Forster's own biased opinion: Aziz's pronouncement sounds more like what a English person would think about the Indians that what an Indian person might say about himself. The word "Oriental," which has come to be rather offensive in the century since Forster's death, adds another layer to the passage's potential bias.

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Part 1, Chapter 6 Quotes

Concentrated on the ball, they somehow became fond of one another, and smiled when they drew rein to rest. Aziz liked soldiers – they either accepted you or swore at you, which was preferable to the civilian’s hauteur – and the subaltern liked anyone who could ride…
They reined up again, the fire of good fellowship in their eyes. But it cooled with their bodies, for athletics can only raise a temporary glow. Nationality was returning, but before it could exert its poison they parted, saluting each other. “If only they were all like that,” each thought.

Related Characters: Dr. Aziz, The Soldier
Page Number: 60
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Aziz plays polo with a British soldier. To their mutual surprise, Aziz and the soldier seem to get along well--in spite of the fact that the soldier is a representative of English aggression against India, and despite the fact that they're playing a physical, potentially violent game, Aziz and the soldier come to genuinely respect one another over the course of the match.

The passage is a kind of metaphor for the relationship between India and Britain--or at least what it could be. Aziz and the soldier maintain their cultural identities, and yet they get along while continuing to respect each other's differences. Their relationship is amicable, and yet very different from the utopian "God loves" philosophy outlined by Mrs. Moore in the previous chapter--here, it is culture (English culture!) that facilitates the friendship between Aziz and the soldier. Notice, too, that the friendship is only temporary--national differences can be suspended, but only briefly. (And Forster will later highlight the irony of this by having the same soldier viciously condemn Aziz, contrasting him with the "good" Indian he played polo with--who was, unbeknownst to him, Aziz himself.)

Part 1, Chapter 11 Quotes

But they were friends, brothers. That part was settled, their compact had been subscribed by the photograph, they trusted one another, affection had triumphed for once in a way.

Related Characters: Dr. Aziz, Cyril Fielding
Page Number: 132
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, from the end of Part One of the novel, the characters make an important breakthrough. Much of the book is concerned with how individuals can become friends and achieve a sincere connection even across divides of culture and oppression. This idea is explored most potently in the two protagonists, Aziz and Fielding. At this point in the novel, it seems that an Englishman and an Indian can be true friends--after this meeting and exchange of trust and affection, Fielding and Aziz feel like "brothers." But as Forster comments rather ominously, this is an exception, not a rule, and even in this seemingly idyllic new friendship affection has only triumphed over division "for once" and only "in a way."

Part 2, Chapter 29 Quotes

“Our letter is a failure for a simple reason which we had better face: you have no real affection for Aziz, or Indians generally.” She assented. “The first time I saw you, you were wanting to see India, not Indians, and it occurred to me: Ah, that won’t take us far. Indians know whether they are liked or not – they cannot be fooled here. Justice never satisfies them, and that is why the British Empire rests on sand.”

Related Characters: Cyril Fielding (speaker), Dr. Aziz, Adela Quested
Page Number: 288-289
Explanation and Analysis:

Adela feels terrible for what she's done to Aziz: by accusing him of assault, she risked his life. Adela tries to apologize to Aziz by writing a letter to him--and yet when she reads her own letter, she decides that it seems flat and insincere. Fielding explains why Adela's writing seems to insincere: it is. This reinforces the idea of the previous passage--that Adela is technically doing the right thing, but she isn't doing out of love or compassion. She doesn't genuinely love Aziz, or any other Indian for that matter--they remain strange and foreign to her, perhaps not totally human, even though in her mind she is trying to be just towards them.

Fielding shows himself to be a keen observer of Indian culture (at least according to Forster's similar observations): he recognizes that Indian people are more honest and open with each other--unlike the English, they don't go through the motions of pretending to be polite to one another; if they don't like each other, they say so. Fielding hints that there will always be a void between India and England because the English think that a formal code of right and wrong can replace the Indians' more instinctive, automatic modes of morality and communication. Neither worldview is inherently better or worse--they're just different--but the problem arises when one system of morality and humanity is externally forced upon the other, as is the case in the colonial system.

Part 2, Chapter 30 Quotes

The poem for Mr. Bhattacharya never got written, but it had an effect. It led him towards the vague and bulky figure of a motherland. He was without natural affection for the land of his birth, but the Marabar Hills drove him to it. Half closing his eyes he attempted to love India.

Related Characters: Dr. Aziz
Page Number: 298
Explanation and Analysis:

After the trial, Forster tells us, Indian Hindus and Muslims start getting along better in Chandrapore--united by a common enemy and a common experience. Mr. Das, the Hindu judge of Aziz's trial, has visited Aziz to ask for a prescription and for Aziz to contribute a poem to a predominantly Hindu magazine. This is a big deal, Forster explains, because usually such a thing would be unheard of, and Aziz usually just writes poems about Islam. When given this opportunity, Aziz contemplates writing a political poem, designed to unite together the Hindus and Muslims in India. While Aziz never writes such a poem, the prompt gets him thinking about the possibilities of a utopian India in which there are no English people in charge, and the internal divisions of India are united under the idea of a common "motherland."

In a strange way, Aziz's traumatic experience in the caves and during the trial inspires him to think about his country in more hopeful, loyal terms: Aziz wants to make sure that the court systems in English are never biased against innocent people, as they were in his situation. The irony, then, is that the Marabar Caves, seemingly symbols of randomness and meaninglessness, are actually "productively" empty--their horrifying lack of meaning ends up inspiring Aziz to seek meaning and unity within his own community and country.

Part 3, Chapter 35 Quotes

“I do not want you, I do not want one of you in my private life, with my dying breath I say it. Yes, yes, I made a foolish blunder; despise me and feel cold. I thought you married my enemy. I never read your letter. Mahmoud Ali deceived me… I forgive Mahmoud Ali all things, because he loved me.” Then pausing, while the rain exploded like pistols, he said: “My heart is for my own people henceforward.”

Related Characters: Dr. Aziz (speaker), Cyril Fielding, Mahmoud Ali
Page Number: 339
Explanation and Analysis:

In this dramatic passage, Aziz reunites with his old friend Fielding. Years have passed, and the two have grown apart. Now, Aziz is angry with Fielding--Aziz long ago turned his back on English culture altogether. In this scene, Aziz learns that Fielding is not, as Aziz had assumed, married to Adela; Aziz's "friend" Mahmoud Ali had lied about the truth to Aziz in order to ensure that Aziz didn't reconcile with either Adela or Fielding.

In spite of his mistake, Aziz refuses to embrace Englishmen once again. Instead of being angry with Ali for lying to him for so long, Aziz insists that he forgives his friend and recognizes that Mahmoud Ali lied out of love more than anything else. Aziz has brushed with the English too many times before--from now on, he's going to stay with his own Indian people. Thus Forster again portrays the complications of humanism, psychology, and culture--Aziz's new sense of nationalism is vital, and in many ways healthy for him, but it also stands in the way of one of his most important friendships, and the central relationship of the novel: the bond between Aziz and Fielding.

Part 3, Chapter 36 Quotes

“Can you always tell whether a stranger is your friend?”
“Yes.”
“Then you are an Oriental.” He unclasped as he spoke, with a little shudder. Those words – he had said them to Mrs. Moore in the mosque in the beginning of the cycle, from which, after so much suffering, he had got free. Never to be friends with the English! Mosque, caves, mosque, caves.

Related Characters: Dr. Aziz (speaker), Ralph Moore (speaker), Mrs. Moore
Related Symbols: The Marabar Caves
Page Number: 349
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Aziz encounters with Ralph Moore, the son of Mrs. Moore. Aziz points out that Ralph is an "Oriental" because he has a natural gift for telling which people are going to be his friends. Aziz then realizes that he said these exact words to Mrs. Moore, years ago--setting in motion a series of events that led up to his being accused of assault in the Marabar Caves. Aziz has the idea that he's been locked in an eternal cycle of friendship (with an English person), followed by disillusionment. He has tried to avoid this by staying away from the English altogether, but now his past has returned, and Aziz feels another inexplicable bond to another Moore. Thus the passage is suspenseful; will Aziz give into his natural friendship with Ralph, and again embrace the possibility of connecting with an Englishman, or will he back away, frightened that accepting Ralph (and Fielding) will only lead to another ugly incident?

“Yes, your mother was my best friend in all the world.” He was silent, puzzled by his own great gratitude. What did this eternal goodness of Mrs. Moore amount to? To nothing, if brought to the test of thought. She had not borne witness in his favour, nor visited him in the prison, yet she had stolen to the depth of his heart, and he always adored her.

Related Characters: Dr. Aziz (speaker), Mrs. Moore, Ralph Moore
Page Number: 350
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Aziz tells Ralph the truth about Mrs. Moore--he adored her, and continues to idealize in his mind. Aziz himself admits that Mrs. Moore never did anything concrete for Aziz, but she projected calmness, kindness, and understanding, which Aziz always responded to with joy and appreciation. It's not clear if Moore really deserves Aziz's appreciation--there are even some signs that she doesn't at all. (She left India instead of testifying at the trial; she never visited him in prison, etc.) And yet Aziz--an Eastern man (as Forster describes it) through and through--doesn't have much conscious control over who he likes and doesn't like. Instead of basing his feelings for Moore on concrete action, he feels an immediate, instinctual liking and empathy for her, which he is unable to reverse--and this feeling is arguably more powerful and lasting than other kinds of friendships (for example, Aziz's faded friendship with Fielding).

Part 3, Chapter 37 Quotes

“Clear out, all you Turtons and Burtons. We wanted to know you ten years back – now it’s too late. If we see you and sit on your committees it’s for political reasons, don’t you make any mistake.” His horse did rear. “Clear out, clear out, I say. Why are we put to so much suffering? We used to blame you, now we blame ourselves, we grow wiser. Until England is in difficulties we keep silent, but in the next European war – aha, aha! Then is our time.”

Related Characters: Dr. Aziz (speaker), Cyril Fielding, Mr. Turton, Mrs. Turton
Page Number: 360
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Aziz predicts that one day, India will rise and claim independence for itself. Much as Ireland rebelled against the U.K. during World War One, Aziz predicts that India will seize a moment of international crisis to stand up for its own independence; then, it will drive out all the Englishmen in the country and take control of its government.

Aziz's remarks (and thus Forster's as well) predict the future. In 1947, more than 20 years after A Passage to India's publication, India would rise up against the British Empire, using the crisis of World War II as an opportunity to fight for freedom. Aziz's remarks seem both selfless and self-absorbed--even though he's making a great speech about the future of his country, and rhetorically throwing off the yoke of colonialism, he's also clearly using politics as a way of lashing out against all the individual English people who have caused him pain and misery over the course of the novel. In doing so, he is again trying to reject Fielding and his offers of friendship.

“…yes, we shall drive every blasted Englishman into the sea, and then” – he rode against him furiously – “and then,” he concluded, half kissing him, “you and I shall be friends.”
“Why can’t we be friends now?” said the other, holding him affectionately. “It’s want I want. It’s what you want.”
But the horses didn’t want it – they swerved apart; the earth didn’t want it, sending up rocks through which riders must pass single file; the temples, the tank, the jail, the palace, the birds, the carrion, the Guest House… they didn’t want it, they said in their hundred voices: “No, not yet,” and the sky said: “No, not there.”

Related Characters: Dr. Aziz (speaker), Cyril Fielding (speaker)
Page Number: 362
Explanation and Analysis:

The novel ends on a cautiously optimistic note. Aziz cannot be true friends with Fielding in the present, despite the fact that they both like (and even love) each other, and have always had a strong bond. True friendship, Forster suggests, never exists in a vacuum, and the specter of colonialism (and cultural differences) still stands in the way of Aziz and Fielding's personal admiration for each other. Put another way, Aziz cannot be friends with Cyril until there's a more equitable relationship between England and India--until both men feel free, and one is not inherently connected to the oppressor, and the other to the oppressed. Only then can the two men get along without all the political baggage of their respective countries.

Forster believes in the possibility of humanistic cooperation between people of different nations, and indeed feels that individual friendship is crucial to overcoming racism, prejudice, and injustice in general (friendship is the most important kind of human connection in the novel, and is central to Forster's humanistic views). Yet Forster also tempers any kind of idealized optimism with an acceptance of the realities of politics and culture, tabling such personal cooperation until the day that two nations themselves can get along and exist as equals. Cyril and Aziz are representatives of their countries, proving that no man can be truly free of his culture and nation. The tragedy of the novel is that friendship has its limits: even when they're trying to be friendly and kind, people find themselves bound to and divided by their own societies--and even their geographies and natural surroundings. Even the horses, birds, and sky--not just the human elements of culture and society--divide Aziz and Fielding in this scene. One day, Englishmen and Indians will be able to get along, but not yet.

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Dr. Aziz Character Timeline in A Passage to India

The timeline below shows where the character Dr. Aziz appears in A Passage to India. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 1, Chapter 2
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Friendship Theme Icon
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Dr. Aziz, a young Muslim Indian, rides his bike and arrives late to his friend Hamidullah’s house.... (full context)
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...that “the other Anglo-Indians will have got hold of him long ago” and corrupted him. Aziz says he prefers to ignore the English altogether. The other men then remember some small... (full context)
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Aziz wanders about in the garden, thinking of Persian poetry, as the other men continue to... (full context)
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...cousin of Hamidullah’s who has never worked and lives entirely by mooching off of Hamidullah. Aziz recites some poetry, mostly romantic verse about the “decay of Islam and the brevity of... (full context)
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A servant interrupts to tell Aziz that his superior, the civil surgeon Major Callendar, wants to see him at his bungalow.... (full context)
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Aziz’s bike tire soon goes flat and then he hires a tonga (a small horse-drawn vehicle)... (full context)
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While Aziz argues with the servant at the door, Mrs. Callendar and her friend Mrs. Lesley come... (full context)
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Aziz walks a while but the ground itself seems “hostile,” and he is soon tired. He... (full context)
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Aziz then notices that there is an Englishwoman in the mosque. He is angered by her... (full context)
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Aziz offers Mrs. Moore his friendship and service to make up for scolding her. He can... (full context)
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Mrs. Moore reveals that her first husband died, and Aziz says that he is in a similar situation. They discover that they each have two... (full context)
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Mrs. Moore brushes aside Aziz’s compliments about her understanding, saying that she doesn’t understand people well – she only knows... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 3
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...learns that she’s talking about an Indian he is surprised and angry, and starts accusing Aziz of impudence. (full context)
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...return to their bungalow. Adela goes to bed and Ronny starts interrogating his mother about Aziz. He uses phrases he has learned from his superiors to discuss Indians, and he interprets... (full context)
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Ronny feels obligated to tell Major Callendar about Aziz being impudent, but Mrs. Moore makes him promise not to. In exchange Ronny asks his... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 5
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...at the College to tea as well, as he might sing something. Adela mentions Dr. Aziz, and Fielding says he will invite him too. (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 6
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Aziz did not go to the Bridge Party. First he was distracted by surgical cases he... (full context)
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The day of the Bridge Party is the anniversary of Aziz’s wife’s death, so he decides not to go. Aziz’s marriage was an arranged one, and... (full context)
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Aziz then borrows Hamidullah’s pony and goes riding to cheer himself up. He plays polo on... (full context)
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Aziz insults Dr. Panna Lal and then leaves, feeling defiant, but by the time he reaches... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 7
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Aziz arrives at Fielding’s house for tea as Fielding is still getting dressed. Fielding invites Aziz... (full context)
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Fielding tells Aziz that Mrs. Moore and Adela are coming to tea as well, and Aziz remembers his... (full context)
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Mrs. Moore and Adela arrive and Aziz is pleased to find that he is still able to be informal around them. The... (full context)
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...she likes mysteries, but dislikes “muddles.” Fielding responds that all of India is a muddle. Aziz doesn’t comment, but invites the ladies to his house. He is then horrified when they... (full context)
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Aziz starts getting emotional talking about justice and kindness, and he waxes poetic about architecture. Fielding... (full context)
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...at a little distance from the others, as he is of the highest Hindu caste. Aziz asks Adela if she plans to stay in India, and she spontaneously answers that she... (full context)
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Mrs. Moore asks to see the college grounds, and Fielding takes her for a tour. Aziz, Adela, and Professor Godbole remain. Adela mentions coming to Aziz’s house again, but Aziz deflects... (full context)
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Professor Godbole teases Aziz for never having been to the Marabar Caves, but when he then tries to describe... (full context)
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...with Indians in an official capacity, so he is ruder than he intends to be. Aziz is unwilling to be ignored, and tries to provoke Ronny to a reaction with his... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 8
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...grows more and more irritated at him for his rudeness to the Indians. She mentions Aziz’s invitation to the Marabar Caves, and in response Ronny calls attention to Aziz’s unpinned collar,... (full context)
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Most of his listeners shudder at the Nawab Bahadur’s story, but Aziz, who is among them, remains aloof. He says that Muslims should get rid of superstitions... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 9
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Aziz gets slightly sick three days after the tea party. He pretends to be more ill... (full context)
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Aziz suddenly notices that his ceiling is covered with flies, and he calls in his servant... (full context)
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Hamidullah enters Aziz’s house to inquire about his health. With him are Syed Mohammed (an engineer), Haq (a... (full context)
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Aziz grows sentimental hearing Hinduism criticized and Islam praised, and he interrupts the conversation to recite... (full context)
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...in England, where there was no need for politics. He is glad that his friend Aziz also takes no interest in politics, “which ruin the character and career, yet nothing can... (full context)
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The visitors affectionately wish Aziz better health and announce that they are leaving, but they remain seated. Dr. Panna Lal... (full context)
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Aziz is embarrassed of his company and his dirty room, but he also tries to make... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 10
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...England as well, but in India it seems closer at hand. The men emerge from Aziz’s bungalow and feel that the heat is almost a physical burden that they must bear.... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 11
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...on the porch and prepares to leave, but the servant won’t bring him his horse. Aziz then calls Fielding back into the house. Aziz is self-deprecating about his poor, dirty home,... (full context)
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Aziz says that he admires Fielding because Fielding treats all men like brothers, which is beyond... (full context)
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...he will go on traveling through life, helping people, and then moving on. He asks Aziz what he thinks of English women, and Aziz will only say that he has heard... (full context)
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Aziz half-jokingly suggests that Fielding should marry Adela, but Fielding is horrified by the idea, and... (full context)
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Aziz agrees that Adela is not right for Fielding, but he mostly disapproves of her for... (full context)
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...He likes to “travel light,” which is why he doesn’t get married and have children. Aziz is amazed by this worldview, which is so different from his own, but Fielding points... (full context)
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Fielding prepares to leave again, and Aziz admits to him that he had given his servant orders not to bring the horse... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 13
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...Adela remarks to Miss Derek that she would have liked to have visited them with Aziz. Adela says that she has observed that Indians are “rather forgetful” about appointments like this.... (full context)
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Aziz goes through a great amount of trouble inviting Mrs. Moore, Adela, Fielding, and Professor Godbole... (full context)
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The train for the Marabar Caves leaves before dawn, so Aziz, Mohammed Latif, and some servants spend the night at the train station to keep from... (full context)
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Aziz and Mohammed Latif discuss how everyone should be treated on the trip, but then the... (full context)
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Mrs. Moore reassures Aziz, saying that “we shall all be Moslems together now,” and Aziz is overcome with fondness... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 14
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...lost her longing to see the “real India,” and she can’t make herself excited about Aziz’s trip. (full context)
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Aziz calls down the train to the ladies, advising them to cover their heads against the... (full context)
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...there is a strange “spiritual” silence. Adela mistakes a tree branch for a snake, and Aziz and the villagers agree that it is a black cobra. Adela then sees that she... (full context)
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...stops at Kawa Dol. Mrs. Moore and Adela are somewhat disappointed by the area, and Aziz doesn’t know the area or understand “this particular aspect of India” enough to explain it.... (full context)
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Aziz thinks to himself that the outing is a success so far, and he grows emotional... (full context)
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The women enjoy themselves more when Aziz talks like this about subjects he likes, and they ask him about another Mughal emperor:... (full context)
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Adela reminds Aziz that she is marrying Ronny, and that this will make her an “Anglo-Indian.” She says... (full context)
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Aziz ends the conversation, feeling that their sense of fellowship has been broken, and he leads... (full context)
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...She declines the invitation to visit another cave, but encourages Adela to go on with Aziz to avoid disappointing him. Mrs. Moore suggests to Aziz that he not let all the... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 15
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Aziz, Adela, and the guide visit several smaller caves, all of which are disappointing. Aziz is... (full context)
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Adela asks Aziz if he is married, and if he has children. He says he does, and doesn’t... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 16
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Aziz waits inside the cave for a moment, and when he comes out he finds that... (full context)
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Aziz is then relieved to see that Adela is down at the bottom of the hill,... (full context)
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Aziz sends some servants to escort Miss Derek from her car, but they find that Miss... (full context)
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Aziz tries to avoid the memory of Adela’s question about multiple wives, so he changes the... (full context)
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Fielding worries that Aziz has been insulted by the women, but Aziz is still ecstatic about the success of... (full context)
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...the train arrives, Mr. Haq, the inspector of police, opens their carriage door and informs Aziz that he is under arrest. Aziz panics and tries to run out a different door,... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 17
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...panics. Turton doesn’t notice, and informs Fielding that Adela herself has lodged the complaint against Aziz. Fielding immediately defends Aziz, calling Adela crazy, and Turton grows furious. (full context)
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Fielding withdraws his remark about Adela, but continues to protest that Aziz must be innocent. Turton, still enraged, lectures him that this is why Indians and Englishmen... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 18
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...is more educated and open-minded than his colleagues, and he is polite and reassuring to Aziz when he arrives at the jail. Aziz is weeping, and McBryde is surprised at the... (full context)
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Fielding arrives and McBryde gives him all the details of the case. Adela claimed that Aziz followed her into a cave and “made insulting advances.” She hit him with her field... (full context)
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...is too upset and sick. Fielding states his theory that Adela is somehow deluded and Aziz is innocent, and McBryde is surprised. Fielding comments that it seems unlikely that Aziz would... (full context)
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...saying that she is very sick. Meanwhile Mahmoud Ali and Hamidullah have arrived to visit Aziz in his cell. Fielding continues to protest Aziz’s innocence, and McBryde wonders why he is... (full context)
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...not let his “personal views” separate him from the other English. Fielding asks to see Aziz, saying that Turton called him away immediately instead of letting him follow Aziz to prison.... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 19
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Hamidullah describes his plans for Aziz’s defense, which includes bringing in a famous anti-British lawyer named Amritrao. Fielding wants to avoid... (full context)
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...him about unrelated college matters. Finally Godbole brings up the Marabar Caves, but doesn’t mention Aziz. Fielding is confused, as Godbole refers to the expedition as “successful,” and asks if Godbole... (full context)
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Fielding is astounded, and says that he can think about nothing but Aziz at the moment. Godbole continues on his tangent until Fielding asks him outright whether he... (full context)
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Fielding gains permission to see Aziz that afternoon, but when he visits Aziz is miserable and accuses Fielding of abandoning him.... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 20
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...He seems angry at the sight of Fielding, and tries to bait him by criticizing Aziz and the “Englishman” who accompanied the expedition. Callendar then converses with the soldier, gossiping that... (full context)
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...Callendar continues to cast aspersions on Fielding’s character, bringing up the fact that Fielding visited Aziz in prison earlier. Callendar is then interrupted by the arrival of Ronny Heaslop. He looks... (full context)
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...him a “swine.” Fielding takes the opportunity to make a statement, declaring that he believes Aziz is innocent. Turton asks why he should still behave so rudely to Ronny, but Fielding... (full context)
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...but glad that he has “muddled through” and is now open about his position regarding Aziz and the English. Fielding goes out onto the veranda and looks at the Marabar Hills,... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 21
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...Mohammed’s grandson’s martyrdom. Fielding spends the evening with the Nawab Bahadur, Hamidullah, Mahmoud Ali, and Aziz’s other friends. They have renewed their application for Aziz’s bail and sent for Amritrao, the... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 22
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...she received from Fielding, which he has already opened. McBryde explains that Fielding has joined Aziz’s side and was a “cad” to Ronny. He describes Fielding as an Englishman among savages,... (full context)
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...behavior, but Adela is suddenly concerned with the possibility that she might be mistaken, and Aziz might be innocent. (full context)
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...she is just tired and upset, but Adela thinks she heard Mrs. Moore say “Doctor Aziz never did it” before she left the room. Ronny tells her that his mother said... (full context)
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...returns, sits down, and starts to play patience. Ronny asks her if she had mentioned Aziz’s name earlier. She says that she never said anything about him, but then she declares... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 24
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...to the unseen,” and she asks God for a favorable verdict on the morning of Aziz’s trial. The only response she seems to get is the sickening heat. (full context)
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...moved them.” Only Ronny seems concerned with Adela’s personality and struggle. On the morning of Aziz’s trial Adela fears that she will break down under the cross-examination, and once again she... (full context)
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...is news of Indian workers striking, and of Muslim women threatening to starve themselves until Aziz is acquitted. All the English in the room feel like Fielding is behind all the... (full context)
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...the prosecution. He doesn’t bother being eloquent, as he assumes that it is obvious that Aziz is guilty. He describes the background of the incident in detail, but then gets diverted... (full context)
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...the English, but he is annoyed. Meanwhile Adela looks out at the crowd and sees Aziz, and she wonders again if she has made a mistake about him. (full context)
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McBryde continues with his evidence, arguing that Aziz “duped” many people beforehand, including Fielding, the servant Antony, and the Nawab Bahadur—trying to argue... (full context)
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...to Ronny, especially because her attack was immediately preceded by her conversation about marriage with Aziz. (full context)
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...leads her along up to the moment of the incident, but when he asks if Aziz followed her into the cave, Adela falls silent, and then asks for a minute to... (full context)
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Adela visualizes the Marabar Caves and her own memories, and she cannot locate Aziz in the picture. She stammers that she is unsure. McBryde tries to direct her towards... (full context)
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...that no one is safe, and then screams insults at Adela. Das officially declares that Aziz should be released “without one stain on his character.” Aziz faints into Hamidullah’s arms, and... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 25
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...the phone lines have been cut. Fielding longs to leave Adela and go celebrate with Aziz, but his conscience won’t let him leave her helpless. Fielding gives Adela a room, encourages... (full context)
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Meanwhile Aziz calls out for Fielding, whom he feels has abandoned him. He takes no joy in... (full context)
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Panna Lal had offered to help the prosecution, as he hates Aziz and wanted to please the English, and he thinks the crowd has come to the... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 26
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...accepts this possibility, and Fielding lists the options for what actually happened in the cave: Aziz did assault Adela (what the English think), Adela maliciously made up the charge against Aziz... (full context)
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Adela asks Fielding what Aziz has said about her. Fielding answers awkwardly, remembering how bitterly Aziz has spoken of Adela,... (full context)
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...is “setting another trap.” He describes how much suffering and ruin she has brought to Aziz, and he asks if the guide will be the next one to suffer. Hamidullah tells... (full context)
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...says that this is Ronny’s punishment for shipping away Mrs. Moore, who loved India and Aziz. Fielding protests but not forcefully, as he recognizes that there will soon be an “Esmiss... (full context)
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Hamidullah and Fielding agree not to break the news to Aziz until the next day, so as not to ruin the celebration for him. Adela then... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 27
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It is late that same night, and most of the partiers at Aziz’s victory celebration are asleep on the Nawab Bahadur’s roof. Fielding and Aziz talk sleepily, lying... (full context)
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Aziz then changes the subject, and for a while they enjoy the “blessings of leisure,” something... (full context)
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Aziz says he can’t be merciful until he receives an apology, and then he mocks Adela... (full context)
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Fielding points out that Aziz’s emotions are not “in proportion to their objects”—Aziz praises and loves Mrs. Moore, who never... (full context)
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Aziz’s time in prison has made him less flighty and more strong-willed, and he presses on... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 28
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...Chandrapore, a legend springs up that Ronny killed his mother because she tried to save Aziz’s life. Two different tombs are reported to contain “Esmiss Esmoor,” and people start to leave... (full context)
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...college, an embarrassment to herself and the English, as the Turtons won’t take her back. Aziz is suing her for damages, and Ronny decides to save any discussion about their relationship... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 29
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...and for accepting her painful, awkward position. He suggests that she write an apology to Aziz, and then dictates it for her. The letter doesn’t seem sincere, though. Fielding suggests a... (full context)
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...however, as the true British power remains strong and untroubled by the trial. Fielding and Aziz argue more about plans for the future and about Aziz’s suit against Adela. Aziz wants... (full context)
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Fielding finally starts bringing up Mrs. Moore to shame Aziz about Adela. Aziz was very upset when he learned of Mrs. Moore’s death—he wept and... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 30
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Another consequence of Aziz’s trial is that the Hindus and Muslims in Chandrapore start getting along better. One day... (full context)
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Aziz agrees to try, and he also writes Das a prescription. Aziz and Das shake hands... (full context)
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Aziz never ends up actually writing a poem for the magazine, but thinking about what might... (full context)
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Aziz decides that he wants to take a job in a Hindu state, to escape British... (full context)
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...that Fielding was having an affair with Adela while she was staying at the college. Aziz makes a joke out of this, again mocking Adela for not being beautiful, but suddenly... (full context)
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...not to be seen by men or strangers). Hamidullah mentions that at the time of Aziz’s trial the women had seemed to be ready to give up purdah, but they have... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 31
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Fielding is away at a conference for several days, and while he is gone Aziz muses on the rumor that Fielding and Adela were lovers. Eventually he believes it to... (full context)
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Aziz meets Fielding at the station when he returns, and brings up the subject by mentioning... (full context)
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Aziz finally tells Fielding the rumor about him, saying that it might injure his reputation. Fielding... (full context)
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Fielding is frustrated by the miscommunications between himself and Aziz. He sees Turton at the post office, and Turton orders Fielding to make an appearance... (full context)
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Fielding then joins Aziz for dinner, and tells him that he is traveling to England soon on official business.... (full context)
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Aziz then wants to change the subject back to Fielding’s trip to England, and he asks... (full context)
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Aziz discusses the flies on the ceiling with his servant once more, and thinks more about... (full context)
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The next day Aziz decides to travel with his children back to their home, so that when he returns... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 33
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The sick Rajah, weeping with joy, is then taken away to see Aziz, who is also living in Mau now and is the doctor attending to the Rajah.... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 34
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Aziz leaves the palace and runs into Godbole on the street. The Professor is still dancing... (full context)
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Aziz instead thinks happily about Professor Godbole, who initially got Aziz his job in Mau, and... (full context)
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Aziz officially works under a Hindu doctor, though he is basically the chief doctor of the... (full context)
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Since then Aziz has thrown away all of Fielding’s letters, and he feels that this is the end... (full context)
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Aziz is happy in Mao, living with his children now and writing poetry. His poems generally... (full context)
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That night Aziz arrives home and finds a note from Fielding (passed on by Godbole) saying that Fielding,... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 35
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...any kind of idol-worship, but in Mau this rule has been softened by Hindu influence. Aziz was angry at the idolatry when he first arrived, but soon he came to like... (full context)
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The morning after the religious ceremony, Aziz takes his three children to visit the shrine of the saint’s head, which is atop... (full context)
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...stop at the jail, and free one prisoner. The prisoners politely discuss their hopes with Aziz’s children. The prisoner’s guard asks Aziz about the Rajah’s health, and Aziz says that his... (full context)
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Aziz’s children then notice that Fielding and his brother-in-law are climbing up to visit the saint’s... (full context)
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Fielding immediately asks Aziz why he hasn’t answered his letters, but he is interrupted by a sudden downpour. They... (full context)
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They reach the carriage, and while helping the Englishmen inside, Aziz addresses Fielding’s brother-in-law as “Mr. Quested.” Fielding is shocked, for he didn’t marry Adela, but... (full context)
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The name “Heaslop” enrages Aziz, who is already ashamed and angry at his own mistake. He admits that he was... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 36
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Around sunset Aziz remembers that he had promised to send ointment to the guest house for Ralph Moore’s... (full context)
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Aziz continues on towards the guest house, but then spits cynically when he sees the English... (full context)
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The other letter Aziz reads is from Adela to Stella. He resents the intimate tone of it, and how... (full context)
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Aziz tries to treat Ralph “as Callendar had treated Nureddin,” but Ralph draws back, saying that... (full context)
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Aziz decides to go, and he absentmindedly puts out his hand to shake Ralph’s. Ralph takes... (full context)
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Aziz says that Ralph is Mrs. Moore’s son, but also Ronny’s brother, and therefore “the two... (full context)
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Aziz worries that the cycle of mosques and caves is beginning again, but he is too... (full context)
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...a flash of lightning and Ralph points at something, asking if it is the Rajah. Aziz rows towards a light in the distance, and sees a mysterious image of a shining... (full context)
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Ralph asks to be taken closer to the Hindu procession, and Aziz complies, asking Ralph not to share the news of the Rajah’s death yet. Ralph seems... (full context)
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Suddenly Fielding’s boat collides with Aziz’s boat just as the Hindu ceremony climaxes. Stella shrinks towards Fielding but then throws herself... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 37
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After the “shipwreck,” Aziz and Fielding suddenly find their old friendship and harmony restored, as if the intervening years... (full context)
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Aziz and Fielding ride through beautiful jungles and fields, feeling happy. The nature they pass seems... (full context)
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Fielding says that Aziz should talk to Stella or Ralph, as they have some interesting ideas about the Marabar... (full context)
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They then discuss politics. Fielding and Aziz have both grown more politically “hardened” than before, and have differing views, but in their... (full context)
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Aziz, on the other hand, says all the English should “clear out,” as the Indians don’t... (full context)
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Aziz declares that India will drive out every last Englishman, even if it must happen in... (full context)