A Tale of Two Cities

A Tale of Two Cities

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The daughter of Dr. Manette, and Charles's wife. With her qualities of innocence, devotion, and abiding love, Lucie has the power to resurrect, or recall her father back to life, after his long imprisonment. Lucie is the novel's central figure of goodness and, against the forces of history and politics, she weaves a "golden thread" that knits together the core group of characters. Lucie represents religious faith: when no one else believes in Sydney Carton, she does. Her pity inspires his greatest deed.

Lucie Manette Quotes in A Tale of Two Cities

The A Tale of Two Cities quotes below are all either spoken by Lucie Manette or refer to Lucie Manette. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Tyranny and Revolution Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Penguin Classics edition of A Tale of Two Cities published in 2003.
Book 1, Chapter 6 Quotes
If you hear in my voice … any resemblance to a voice that once was sweet music in your ears, weep for it, weep for it! If you touch, in touching my hair, anything that recalls a beloved head that lay on your breast when you were young and free, weep for it, weep for it! If, when I hint to you of a Home that is before us, where I will be true to you with all my duty and with all my faithful service, I bring back the remembrance of a Home long desolate, while your poor heart pined away, weep for it, weep for it!
Related Characters: Lucie Manette (speaker), Dr. Alexandre Manette
Page Number: 48
Explanation and Analysis:

In this scene of reunification between Manette and his daughter, the pathos of Manette's sorry condition joins with the bittersweet attitude of Lucie in finding her father, whom she long thought dead, alive but old and confused. Manette seems to have recognized something of his wife in Lucie, and Lucie clings to this possibility, suggesting that she has come, in a way, to replace her mother, and to offer her father a chance for a new life with her. By creating a correspondence between her own face and that of her mother, but also by making a contrast between Manette's former desolate home and the new, happy home that she hopes to make for him, Lucie stresses that it is possible to gain second chances.

For Lucie, it is as if her father had risen from the dead, since she never knew him to be alive. Learning of his presence is such a powerful feeling for her that it seems to be almost a miracle, spurring her to want to sacrifice anything for the sake of her father. This sentiment is only further prompted by her recognition of his prison-like environment, from which she hopes to rescue him.

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Book 2, Chapter 4 Quotes
Only his daughter had the power of charming this black brooding from his mind. She was the golden thread that united him to a Past beyond his misery, and to a Present beyond his misery: and the sound of her voice, the light of her face, the touch of her hand, had a strong beneficial influence with him almost always.
Related Characters: Dr. Alexandre Manette, Lucie Manette
Related Symbols: Knitting and the Golden Thread
Page Number: 83
Explanation and Analysis:

Although Dr. Manette has been "resurrected" into new life by the care of his daughter Lucie, not all of the frightening power of his imprisonment has left him. He still tends to be brooding and gloomy, unable to entirely shake himself of the madness that had once enveloped his life. Still, he is clearly aware of and grateful for Lucie's strong-willed direction.

As a "golden thread," a charmed version of the threads woven by the Fates that direct our lives and the course of history, Lucie seems to possess the power to turn at least individual lives for the better, based only on her own love and commitment. Nonetheless, it is not yet clear whether or not Lucie's golden thread will prove more powerful than the Fates or history, or whether it is just one part of a greater universal plan, one in which her small actions ultimately cannot undo the all-powerful workings of Fate or history.

Book 2, Chapter 10 Quotes
He had loved Lucie Manette from the hour of his danger. He had never heard a sound so sweet and dear as the sound of her compassionate voice; he had never seen a face so tenderly beautiful, as hers when it was confronted with his own on the edge of the grave that had been dug for him.
Related Characters: Charles Darnay (a.k.a. Charles Evrémonde), Lucie Manette
Page Number: 135
Explanation and Analysis:

Charles, having abandoned his aristocratic heritage, now lives in London and continues to be in love with Lucie, even going as far as to proclaim his love for her to her father. Here, we once again see the power that Lucie can hold over people. Charles is described as emerging out of a grave thanks to Lucie's beautiful face. Like Lucie's father, he feels that he is in some way raised from the dead thanks to the goodness that emanates from her. While Charles had all the riches he could have wanted thanks to his aristocratic family, for him such a heritage is confining far more than it is liberating – it is his love for Lucie that is freeing.

Book 2, Chapter 13 Quotes
For you, and for any dear to you, I would do anything. If my career were of that better kind that there was any opportunity or capacity of sacrifice in it, I would embrace any sacrifice for you and for those dear to you. Try to hold me in your mind, at some quiet times, as ardent and sincere in this one thing. The time will come, the time will not be long in coming, when new ties will be formed about you […] O Miss Manette, […] when you see your own bright beauty springing up anew at your feet, think now and then that there is a man who would give his life, to keep a life you love beside you!
Related Characters: Sydney Carton (speaker), Lucie Manette
Page Number: 159
Explanation and Analysis:

Sydney Carton has gone to visit Lucie and finds himself proclaiming his love for her, at the same time that he recognizes, though in a way that is excruciating for him, how little he deserves her because of his (still mysterious) past. Lucie nonetheless expresses a conviction that Carton can lead a better life. Here, Carton expresses his profound gratefulness to Lucie by vowing to sacrifice anything for her, even his life. 

Carton's words seem to foretell a moment in the future of great change for Lucie. Perhaps he is thinking of Stryver, or perhaps he's simply realized that Lucie should and will marry someone who deserves her, but he wants to make sure that she knows of his feelings for her. Even if he doesn't realize it, Carton is in fact prophetic, as his vow of sacrifice will indeed have to be tested later on in the novel.

Book 2, Chapter 20 Quotes
My husband, it is so. I fear he is not to be reclaimed; there is scarcely a hope that anything in his character or fortunes is reparable now. But, I am sure that he is capable of good things, gentle things, even magnanimous things.
Related Characters: Lucie Manette (speaker), Charles Darnay (a.k.a. Charles Evrémonde), Dr. Alexandre Manette
Page Number: 217
Explanation and Analysis:

Charles has spoken critically about Sydney Carton at dinner with the entire household that evening, and now, later at night and in private, Lucie gently reproves him for being overly harsh towards the man. Unlike Charles, Lucie is convinced that Carton may yet prove himself redeemable – he may yet have another, new life ahead of him.

Lucie is not overly naive or idealistic; she does, after all, acknowledge that Carton's past character and fortunes count a great deal against him. In that sense, he has created his own situation, and cannot be liberated from the choices he has made. At the same time, however, Lucie may well be thinking of the conversation she had with Carton, one that helped to convince her of his good intentions and possibility for redemption. It is also worth noting that in many cases in the novel it is Lucie's belief that someone can redeem themselves that allows that gives that person the strength to actually achieve redemption.

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Lucie Manette Character Timeline in A Tale of Two Cities

The timeline below shows where the character Lucie Manette appears in A Tale of Two Cities. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Book 1, Chapter 4
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In Dover, Mr. Lorry takes a room at the Royal George Hotel. The 17-year-old Lucie Manette arrives that same afternoon, having received vague instructions to meet a Tellson's Bank employee... (full context)
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...having been jailed by the authorities and taken to a secret prison. Rather than tell Lucie the truth, Lucie's mother told her that her father was dead. Lucie's mother herself died... (full context)
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Mr. Lorry braces Lucie for a shock: her father is not dead. He has been found, though he's a... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 5
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...counter, his wife, Madame Defarge, silently alerts him to the presence of Mr. Lorry and Lucie. Defarge ignores them, instead lamenting the condition of the people with three men, all of... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 6
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Lucie approaches, with tears in her eyes. The shoemaker asks who she is. Noticing her blonde... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 2
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...bored-looking Mr. Carton. When Darnay glances at a young woman and her father sitting nearby (Lucie and Dr. Manette), word flashes through the crowd that these two are witnesses against Darnay.... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 3
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Mr. Lorry, Lucie, and Dr. Manette are each called to testify: they had all met Charles aboard ship... (full context)
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...to deliberate. Carton continues to look bored, stirring only to order help when he notices Lucie start to faint. Finally, the jury returns from its deliberations with a verdict of not... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 4
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After the trial, Charles kisses Lucie's hands in gratitude and thanks Stryver for his help. Dr. Manette is now a distinguished... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 6
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Four months pass. Mr. Lorry visits Dr. Manette and Lucie at their home. Lucie has decorated the house beautifully, but Mr. Lorry notices that Manette's... (full context)
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Dr. Manette and Lucie are out, though. Mr. Lorry speaks with Miss Pross, who comments on and dismisses all... (full context)
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Lucie and Manette return. Charles arrives to visit moments later. Charles tells them of his recent... (full context)
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Sydney Carton also visits. Sitting out on the veranda as a storm approaches, Lucie tells him that she sometimes imagines that the echoes of the footsteps from the pedestrians... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 10
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...visits Dr. Manette. During the visit, Charles tells Dr. Manette of his deep love for Lucie. Dr. Manette at first seems frightened by the news, but relaxes when Charles promises that... (full context)
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...asks Charles to tell him on the morning of his wedding, not before. That night, Lucie returns and finds her father again making shoes. (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 11
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Because Carton had previously (though insincerely) insulted Lucie, Stryver breaks the news to him carefully: he plans to marry her. Stryver thinks she's... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 12
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On his way to Lucie Manette's house to propose, Mr. Stryver passes Tellson's Bank and decides to drop in on... (full context)
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...with the expected bad news, Stryver has already decided to drop it. He explains that Lucie shares the "vanities and giddiness of empty-headed girls" and that he's better off without her. (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 13
...After Mr. Stryver informs him that he's given up his plans to propose, Carton visits Lucie for a private conversation. (full context)
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Lucie is astonished when Carton breaks into tears over his wasted life during the visit. She... (full context)
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Carton tells Lucie he loves her, that she is "the last dream of [his] soul." But that even... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 16
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Barsad changes tactics. Knowing that Defarge was once Dr. Manette's servant, he mentions that Lucie is now married to Charles Darnay—who is in reality the nephew of the Marquis Evrémonde.... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 17
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Lucie spends the last night before her wedding to Charles with her father. She asks Dr.... (full context)
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For the first time, Dr. Manette talks to Lucie about his imprisonment in the Bastille. He tells her that while there, he passed the... (full context)
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Late that night, Lucie sneaks downstairs to check on her sleeping father. Dr. Manette's face is deeply worn from... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 18
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After the wedding, Charles and Lucie leave for their honeymoon in Wales. The plan is for Dr. Manette to join the... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 20
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The first person to visit Lucie and Charles after they return from their honeymoon is Sydney Carton. Carton apologizes for his... (full context)
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At dinner that night, Charles comments to Lucie, Manette, Mr. Lorry, and Miss Pross about Carton's careless and reckless behavior. Later that night... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 21
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Years pass. Lucie weaves her "golden thread" of positive influence through the family. She often sits by the... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 24
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...to send to Gabelle: Evrémonde will come. Charles packs secretly, writes a letter each to Lucie and Dr. Manette, and without telling them leaves for France the following night. (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 2
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Mr. Lorry is stunned when Lucie and Dr. Manette rush in. They left London immediately after reading Charles's letters. Dr. Manette's... (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 3
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...to separate Tellson's Bank from his own personal business, Mr. Lorry finds an apartment for Lucie and her family, and leaves Jerry Cruncher with them to act as guard. On the... (full context)
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...knitting, and The Vengeance. Defarge tells Lorry that, in order to be able to protect Lucie, Madame Defarge must see and remember Lucie's face. (full context)
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In the apartment, Lucie reads the note from Charles: he is fine, and under Dr. Manette's protection. She gratefully... (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 5
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Through it all, Lucie tries to keep a normal English household to relieve her mind. Dr. Manette reassures her... (full context)
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As Lucie stands at her spot on the street each day, a wood-sawyer—formerly a mender of roads—who... (full context)
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One snowy day, as Lucie stands outside the prison, she sees a crowd of people dancing to a popular revolutionary... (full context)
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Moments later, Dr. Manette appears. He tells Lucie that Charles's trial will be held tomorrow, and promises her that all will work out... (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 6
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...aristocratic title and property, then worked as a French tutor and married a French woman: Lucie Manette. He says that he returned to France to save the life of a citizen... (full context)
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When she sees Charles, Lucie faints with joy. In their apartment, she thanks God, then her father, who declares, "I... (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 7
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The next day, Manette remains confident and proud at having saved Charles, but Lucie continues to fear for her husband's safety because so many other innocent people have been... (full context)
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That afternoon, as Miss Pross and Jerry are out on errands, Lucie hears footsteps on the stairs outside the apartment. Then there is a knock at the... (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 9
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...Barsad will smuggle Carton into Charles's cell. Refusing to explain anything more, Carton asks that Lucie be told nothing about the plan. He then asks if Mr. Lorry is satisfied with... (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 11
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...conviction in the streets, John Barsad, who is escorting Charles back to his cell, lets Lucie her embrace her husband for the last time. Charles says farewell and asks her to... (full context)
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Lucie faints. Carton carries her to a carriage and escorts her home. There, he instructs Dr.... (full context)
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Lucie's daughter begs Carton to help. Carton embraces her and, before he leaves, kisses the unconscious... (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 12
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...The Vengeance, and Jacques Three, in which Madame Defarge plots to exterminate the Evrémonde line—including Lucie and Lucie's daughter. She says that she and the wood-sawyer will testify against Lucie for... (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 13
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...prison, 52 people, including Charles, await execution that day. Charles writes a final letter to Lucie, in which he says that he did not know about her father's history and that... (full context)
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...barricade, guards check the papers of the passengers in a carriage: Mr. Lorry, Dr. Manette, Lucie, and "Sydney Carton," who is unconscious. They wave the carriage through. (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 14
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...that they must exterminate the Evrémondes themselves. Jacques Three swears that his jury will condemn Lucie, and fantasizes about the blond hair and blue eyes of Lucie's beheaded child at the... (full context)
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...tigress, a woman without pity, armed with a knife and loaded pistol. She heads to Lucie's apartment, hoping to strengthen her case by catching Lucie insulting the Revolution in her grief. (full context)
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...after, Madame Defarge arrives at the apartment and demands that Miss Pross let her see Lucie. Miss Pross refuses to budge from Lucie's bedroom door. Madame Defarge tries to shove her... (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 15
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...will rise up from its ashes, struggling to be free. He sees a vision of Lucie with a new son, named after him, who will live a successful and prosperous life.... (full context)