All The King's Men

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Willie “The Boss” Stark Character Analysis

The novel’s protagonist (along with Jack Burden, the narrator), Willie, over the course of All the King’s Men, drags himself up from impoverished circumstances, initially eschews alcohol, earns a law degree, and, after holding small-town elected office, eventually becomes governor of the state of Louisiana. Willie, who made a name for himself as a young politician because of his opposition to government corruption, later becomes ensnarled in a series of backroom deals, which indirectly lead to the circumstances of his death, an assassination in the capitol building. Jack remarks numerous times in the novel that Willie’s story is in some sense his own story—their friendship and work relationship has made their lives inseparable.

Willie “The Boss” Stark Quotes in All The King's Men

The All The King's Men quotes below are all either spoken by Willie “The Boss” Stark or refer to Willie “The Boss” Stark. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Idealism vs. Pragmatism Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Harvest Books edition of All The King's Men published in 2006.
Chapter 1 Quotes

The beauty about Tiny is that nobody can trust him and you know it. You get somebody somebody can trust maybe, and you got to sit up nights worrying whether you are the somebody. You get Tiny, and you can get a night’s sleep. All you got to do is keep the albumen scared out of his urine.

Related Characters: Willie “The Boss” Stark (speaker), Jack Burden, Tiny Duffy
Page Number: 24
Explanation and Analysis:

Willie Stark's philosophy of politics is at once simple and infinitely complex. On the one hand, he believes that, to manipulate people, you must flatter them, cajole them, be kind to them, give them things, tell them what they want to hear. But you must also strike the fear of God into them - you must cause them to believe that you are the powerful one, and that all they can do is listen.

With Duffy, Stark first approached cautiously. Then he realized Duffy (Tiny) was not a trustworthy man, nor a loyal man - that he would do whatever it took to remain viable in a political system prone to change, and to make more money for himself. When Stark noticed this, as in the quote, he was relieved - he saw that Tiny could be handled through a combination of kindness and the instilling of fear. This political philosophy Stark will put into practice throughout the novel, often to startlingly positive (or persuasive) effect. 

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Man is conceived in sin and born in corruption and he passeth from the stink of the didie to the stench of the shroud. There is always something.

Related Characters: Willie “The Boss” Stark (speaker), Jack Burden, Judge Irwin
Page Number: 235
Explanation and Analysis:

Willie has come down to Burden's Landing on a political mission - and in order to achieve what he desires, he must put pressure on Judge Irwin. Jack believes that Irwin cannot be pressured - Jack has known Irwin all his life, and he flinches at the thought of trading in on that relationship in order to push a political agenda.

But Willie has no such worry about the trip. Indeed, he relies on Jack's deep and sustained relationships with the political "old guard" of Louisiana. Without them, Willie would be just another upstart, a man trying, as best he can, to make his way in Southern politics without a name for himself. When Willie argues that dirt can be "dug up" on anyone, he means that all mean are fallible, that all have made mistakes in the past - and that these mistakes can, and should, be used for political leverage. This kind of politics is relatively new to Jack, even though he knows it's the way that Willie often plays the game. 

Chapter 2 Quotes

About two years after [the schoolhouse] was built, it happened. There was a fire drill, and all the kids on the top floors started to use the fire escapes. . . . Because the little kids held up the traffic, the fire escape and the iron platform at the top got packet with kids. Well, some of the brickwork gave and the bolts and bars holding the contraption to the wall pulled loose and the whole thing fell away, spraying kids in all directions.

Related Characters: Jack Burden (speaker), Willie “The Boss” Stark
Page Number: 97
Explanation and Analysis:

Jack attempts to describe how, exactly, Willie came to power. Willie did so in part by pushing for a county bond to establish a new, higher quality schoolhouse. The corrupt county politicians agree to build the school, but bid cheaply, and the school eventually falls apart, killing many children inside. What's most striking about this moment, apart from its tragedy, is the means by which Willie uses that tragedy to further his own ends. He makes it plain that he has always opposed these cheap bricks, that he was on the side of the people even though the people didn't know he was on their side - that, in other words, he was, and always has been, a populist champion. This will become Willie's political identity, and he will develop it throughout the novel, even as he ascends to the role of governor in the state. Jack, for his part, recognizes both the sincerity of Willie's desire to help the people, and the way this desire also helps Willie professionally. 

I don’t know whether Willie meant to do it. But anyway, he did it. He didn’t exactly shove Duffy off the platform. He just started Duffy doing a dance along the edge, a kind of delicate, feather-toed, bemused, slow-motion adagio accompanied by arms pinwheeling around a face which was like a surprised custard pie with a hole scooped in the middle of the meringue . . . .

Related Characters: Jack Burden (speaker), Willie “The Boss” Stark, Tiny Duffy
Page Number: 139
Explanation and Analysis:

What is more important than Willie's "shove" of Duffy from the platform stage is the political gumption that underlies it. Willie has realized that he is a "stooge" candidate for governor at this point in his career. He has been nominated by the Democratic machine in order to split the vote with another candidate - such that the will of the party bosses prevails. When Stark realizes this is the case, he becomes enraged, and, with great shrewdness, realizes there are only two things he can do. On the one hand, he could back down and meekly do what the party says. On the other, he could lash out, show that the party is trying to subvert the democratic process - and hope that the voters will respond positively to this kind of populist message. It is a rulebook that Willie will play by for his entire political career, and it will make him, for a time, into the most powerful man in the state. 

Chapter 3 Quotes

If the government of this state for quite a long time back had been doing anything for the folks in it, would Stark have been able to get out there with his bare hands and bust the boys? And would he be having to make so many short cuts to get something done to make up for the time lost all these years . . . ?

Related Characters: Jack Burden (speaker), Willie “The Boss” Stark, Judge Irwin, Jack’s Mother, Mr. and Mrs. Patton
Page Number: 187
Explanation and Analysis:

Jack Burden defends Willie's actions as Governor to the Irwins and the Pattons, families that represent some of the oldest and most powerful interests in the state - the bulwarks of Burden's Landing and of southern Louisiana more broadly. Jack is caught between two worlds. On the one hand, he hints that he recognizes the crudeness of Willie's methods, his populism, and his attempts to woo voters by catering to their emotions rather than to their rational minds. But Jack also sees that Willie is invested in real change, and that he wants to make the state better. Those in power, like the Irwins and Pattons, who have been in power for a long time, do not necessarily want to change the status quo to help those less fortunate. Indeed, for them the status quo is what makes them powerful in the first place. And even as Jack dines with and socializes with these families, he sees how limited their worldview is. 

There’s nothing in the constitution says that Byram B. White can commit a felony with impunity.

Related Characters: Hugh Miller (speaker), Willie “The Boss” Stark, Byram White
Page Number: 205
Explanation and Analysis:

Hugh Miller, the state attorney general of Louisiana, objects to Willie's massaging of a tricky situation involving White, who, in an official capacity, has been caught skimming money. Willie knows that there is nothing more important than having something to "hold over" another person - that is, a criminal or unethical act that can be used to blackmail someone and force them to follow Willie's orders.

In other words, Willie is excited when he catches White committing fraud, since this means he will now have leverage with White - White will be in his pocket instead of in someone else's. This is how Willie operates. And Hugh Miller, who vows he has sworn to uphold the law, will not stand for it. But Jack, interestingly, simply watches. He neither condones nor decries Willie's behavior - he merely takes it all in, and reports it to the reader. 

Chapter 9 Quotes

God damn it, so the bastard crawled out on me.
I didn’t say anything.
I didn’t tell you to scare him to death, I just told you to scare him.
He wasn’t scared.
What the hell did he do it for then?

Related Characters: Willie “The Boss” Stark (speaker), Jack Burden (speaker), Judge Irwin
Page Number: 535
Explanation and Analysis:

Irwin's suicide, which mirrors Littlepaugh's suicide years before in the American Electric case, is a double blow for Jack. First, it is an indicator of what can go wrong when one person tries to utterly ruin another - that second person always has the horrible option of ending his or her life, thus stopping the power dynamic of blackmail. And, even more importantly, Irwin's act causes Jack's mother to reveal that Jack is really Irwin's son - that Jack was the child, out of a wedlock, of a romantic union between his own mother and Judge Irwin.

This latter piece of news is almost too much for Jack to bear. For not only does he learn that his own father, the Scholarly Attorney, is not his biological father - he learns that he has caused his biological father to kill himself, all for political gain for Willie Stark, not even for Jack Burden. 

Sugar-boy was leaning above him, weeping and sputtering, trying to speak. He finally managed to get out the words:
“D-d-d-does it hur-hur-hur-hurt much, Boss--?”

Related Characters: Willie “The Boss” Stark (speaker), Sugar-Boy (speaker)
Page Number: 598
Explanation and Analysis:

Willie's lieutenants, those who have supported him his entire political life, who have believed in him since he was a young and unpolished man - they gather around him now, in the hospital he has built, hoping that he does not die of the gunshot wound he has suffered in the capital (the bullet fired by Adam). Willie's operatives (particularly Sugar-Boy) are loyal to him to the end, vowing that, if he does die, he will not die in vain, and that the state will long recognize Willie's achievements.

But Jack, seeing Willie suffer, has a more complex set of emotions. For Adam has killed Willie, in part, for sleeping with Anne - thus "ruining" Anne's reputation, as Adam sees it. Jack, of course, is devastated to know about Anne's relationship with Willie, and the fact that Anne and Willie seem to be genuinely in love. Knowledge of the affair caused Jack to drive away to Los Angeles, and perhaps, too, to give up on romantic possibility altogether. This same revelation happened to drive Adam to murderous frenzy. 

He died the next morning, just about day. There was a hell of a big funeral. The city was jam-packed with people, all kinds of people . . . people who had never been on pavement before.

Related Characters: Jack Burden (speaker), Willie “The Boss” Stark
Page Number: 603
Explanation and Analysis:

The people of Louisiana adore Willie. He was their champion all his life, a populist hero for the state, who made his career early on by defying large-scale political interests and the moneyed classes that ruled Louisiana. Willie dared to put the interests of the people first, and to use them to gain political power.

That, at least, is the public story. In private, however, and as the novel demonstrates, Willie was a populist as much for his own advancement as for the sake of the people's. He saw that he could do good by promising to be one of the people, not a special interest - yet he became so powerful that no one, he felt, could touch him. And Willie, by the end of his life, believed that any tactic was fair to pursue for political purposes - any kind of blackmail, any kind of illicit or behind-the-scenes leverage. It is this second part of his political life that the people on the sidewalks did not see, and Jack knows this. 

Chapter 10 Quotes

Oh . . . and I killed Willie. I killed him.
Yes.
Oh God . . .

Related Characters: Jack Burden (speaker), Sadie Burke (speaker), Willie “The Boss” Stark
Page Number: 618
Explanation and Analysis:

Jack realizes that Sadie leaked the information to Adam that Willie and Anne were having an affair, because Sadie at least partially knew that Adam would be so enraged to hear it that he would do anything to stop Willie. Sadie did this because she loved Willie, after having served him loyally for years, and she couldn't bear the thought of Anne being with him. Duffy, Willie's operative, also participated in this leveraging of behind-the-scenes information, since Duffy, too, knew that he could destroy Willie this way - and Duffy had his eyes on bigger payoffs and greater office than he could achieve with Willie in power.

Thus Willie was undone by his own affair with Anne, but moreover undone by those who promised to be loyal to him. Sadie and Duffy used Willie's own tactics against him, and Sadie, at this point in the novel, is in a mental institution, having suffered a breakdown; she recognizes that she has suffered for Willie's murder, though perhaps not as much as Willie has. 

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Willie “The Boss” Stark Character Timeline in All The King's Men

The timeline below shows where the character Willie “The Boss” Stark appears in All The King's Men. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1
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...The narrator indicates that he is sitting in the car with Sugar-Boy, the driver; the Boss (his boss); the Boss’s wife and son; and Mr. Duffy. The narrator also indicates that... (full context)
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...car, following the car in which the narrator sits, contains Sadie Burke (secretary to the Boss) and a pool of journalists who have been assigned to cover this particular trip. The... (full context)
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...the surrounding countryside, the two cars stop in front of a soda fountain, and the Boss (whose name is revealed to be Willie Stark) gets out to have a Coke, since... (full context)
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The Boss goes up to an old man the narrator terms Old Leather Face, and asks about... (full context)
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But the Boss walks up to the steps of the Mason City courthouse, and it appears he is... (full context)
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A man shouts at Willie from the crowd, apparently making fun of him, but Willie has a quick retort for... (full context)
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Willie, Lucy, his son, the narrator, and Mr. Duffy get back in the Cadillac, and Sugar-Boy... (full context)
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...Harrison’s top men in that region—part of Harrison’s Democratic machine in the state. Alex introduces Willie to Slade, the narrator, and Duffy, and makes fun of Willie, joking that he married... (full context)
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Willie finally introduces himself, formally, to the table, and we find out that the narrator’s last... (full context)
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Burden switches back to 1922. Burden recalls Willie being offered a beer by Duffy, and Willie declining this beer several times, implying that... (full context)
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...remainder of the four men’s conversation, that day in 1922, when Alex convinces Duffy that Willie is not just some interloper, as Duffy had thought him to be, nor a country... (full context)
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The Boss tells Burden, back in the car in 1936, that Burden should find a good lawyer,... (full context)
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Duffy, in the car, nervously tells the Boss that Malaciah’s son, as Duffy has heard it, knifed the son of an important political... (full context)
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The black Cadillac pulls up next to the house where Willie grew up, a farmhouse in rural Mason County. Burden remarks that Willie never really had... (full context)
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Willie’s father, an old farmer, skinny and wrinkled and taciturn, emerges from the house and welcomes,... (full context)
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The photographer then takes some photos of Willie in his old bedroom, where he had studied for the law exam when he was... (full context)
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Sadie rushes out to join Burden and Willie out back, by the fence. She has something to tell Willie, but is so flustered... (full context)
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Burden leaves Sadie and Willie, who has taken this news poorly, and goes off to watch Sugar-Boy shooting, and cursing,... (full context)
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Burden, Willie, and Sugar-Boy get into the Cadillac, and the Boss announces that they will be traveling... (full context)
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Willie reveals to the reader, by speaking to Jack, that Jack grew up in Burden’s Landing,... (full context)
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The Boss tells Jack to go up to the door and knock for Judge Irwin, who is... (full context)
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The Boss and Irwin stare each other down for a long moment, and Jack wonders what he... (full context)
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...says he does not support Masters as a Senate candidate because Masters will do whatever Willie, governor of the state, wants. Willie says that he is not trying to scare Irwin... (full context)
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This latter piece of blackmail is too much for Irwin, who kicks Willie out of his house. Willie calls Jack to follow him, and the Judge and Jack... (full context)
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Willie then says, in a famous line, that “Man is conceived in sin and born in... (full context)
Chapter 2
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...that forms the novel), it is 1939, and that his visit to Mason City and Willie’s father’s house occurred in 1936. Burden then goes on to describe the first time he... (full context)
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...talking. As part of his reporting, Burden asks the men if they know anything about Willie Stark’s efforts to get a new bond issued for a schoolhouse in Mason County. The... (full context)
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...award Moore and not Jeffers the bid. Both the sheriff and Pillsbury also imply that Willie is willing to give the job to black laborers over white ones. (full context)
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Burden visits Willie, whose office happens to be at the other end of a long hallway in the... (full context)
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Burden then relates to the reader the story Willie told him long ago, in 1922, which, in essence, states that Moore was using cheap... (full context)
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Willie tried to get his side of the story out, after losing the election, in other... (full context)
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Burden falls out of touch with Willie again for those three years between 1922 and 1925, when Willie works on his father’s... (full context)
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Because Willie had made a name for himself in the local papers in the intervening three years... (full context)
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Willie is “placed” in this election by the powers that be in the state’s Democratic Party... (full context)
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Burden states that Willie, during this 1926 election, is a lawyer—and that he had passed the bar exam on... (full context)
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Now, in 1926, Burden is following Willie’s campaign for Governor as a reporter for the Chronicle, and because he has known Willie... (full context)
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...and is joined by Sadie Burke, who has recently moved from the Harrison machine to Willie’s campaign. Burden tells Sadie he knows that she knows that Willie is only a split-the-vote... (full context)
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In Upton, Willie walks into Burden’s hotel room and admits, glumly, that his campaign is going poorly, although... (full context)
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Willie becomes extremely upset and asks Burden if it’s true that he’s been framed, and that... (full context)
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...and thought her to be a “tough cookie.” The next morning, Burden tries to rouse Willie by giving him coffee, but Willie is so hung-over he can’t stomach anything—but he must... (full context)
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Willie, now freed from the belief that he needs to educate the people, gives a rousing... (full context)
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Willie spends the remainder of the campaign season stumping for MacMurfee, who wins the election, but... (full context)
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...the fact that Duffy and Sadie, once working for Harrison, now choose to work for Willie as Governor. Duffy eventually becomes a bigwig in the Stark administration and then Lt. Governor,... (full context)
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Burden then reports on time he spends with two childhood friends in 1930, just after Willie’s election and his being fired from the paper—Adam and Anne Stanton. Adam is a famous... (full context)
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...speak with Jack about a job, seeing he is out of work at the paper. Willie offers to pay Jack three hundred a month to work not for the state but... (full context)
Chapter 3
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...visit home to his mother, in Burden’s Landing, in 1933, after he’s been working for Willie for about three years. Burden says he always finds visits home to his mother to... (full context)
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...polite though curt with him. As Jack speaks to his mother about his job with Willie—a job his mother does not approve of, since she considers Willie to be a classless... (full context)
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...finds this job fascinating, the conversation quickly turns to Irwin’s and Mr. Patton’s reservations about Willie, whom they consider a classless populist and a dangerous revolutionary in office (this is three... (full context)
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Irwin attempts to calm everyone and to admit that Willie has made some advances in office, though he (Irwin) is worried that Willie wants too... (full context)
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Jack arrives at Willie’s office in the capital and finds out immediately that a man named Byram White, the... (full context)
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Willie tells Byram to write, in front of him, a resignation letter and to sign it,... (full context)
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Next a man named Hugh Miller, Willie’s state attorney general, comes in. Miller is a friend of Willie’s from long since, but... (full context)
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...whether he has done the right thing—protecting Byram and allowing Miller to resign—Jack admits that Willie has to run the government the way he knows how, and Willie, exasperated at this... (full context)
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Jack then recalls another episode in Willie’s life, this time his personal life, during his time as Governor. About six or eight... (full context)
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Jack points out that Willie has really cheated on his wife, and that he is only secondarily cheating on Sadie,... (full context)
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Jack then reveals that, after a long spate of Willie’s infidelities, Lucy Stark finally decides to leave her husband, but she claims she is doing... (full context)
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...a whirlwind by Burden. No one in the office seems the sleep the entire time; Willie travels the state in the black Cadillac and attempts to convince the public, through rousing... (full context)
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...on April 4th, 1933, a large group of citizens assemble outside the capitol building, where Willie is slated to give a speech later that evening. Burden observes the crowd from out... (full context)
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...sheet of paper with signatures from a significant number of legislators who, after meeting with Willie, will swear that impeachment proceedings should not go forward, and that Willie is innocent of... (full context)
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...religious conversations about the nature of God and man, and Burden wonders to himself where Willie fits into this cosmic system—whether he can maintain the power he has, whether Willie himself... (full context)
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...then goes out and stands with Adam and Anne, who have joined him to see Willie speak—after the speech (which Jack does not describe) Jack leaves his friends and heads back... (full context)
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Burden then closes the chapter by stating that Lucy did wind up leaving Willie, more or less, but not entirely, not legally—she keeps up appearances until his reelection in... (full context)
Chapter 4
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Burden begins the chapter by looping back to his initial conversation with Irwin, along with Willie, at Irwin’s home in 1936. Burden states, again, that he did in fact manage to... (full context)
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...Jack underwent just after being fired from the reporter job, and before being hired by Willie, ended finally when Jack was hired at the newspaper. His old landlady in the squalid... (full context)
Chapter 5
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...event: the nighttime conversation with Irwin, in Burden’s Landing, in 1936. That night, Burden and Willie drove back to Mason City in the black Cadillac, and before falling asleep in the... (full context)
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...Judge. Jack then shifts the narration to a football game he is watching with the Boss—a game presumably at Louisiana State University, where the Boss’s son Tom is a star quarterback. (full context)
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Tom does extremely well in the game, and the Boss comes up to him, afterward, to congratulate him. The Boss is angry that Lucy still... (full context)
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...ever broke as a young man. Anne senses that Jack is asking this question for Willie’s sake, and reiterates her position that Willie is a bad man, a politician who will... (full context)
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...Jack wants to know this about Irwin, and Jack replies, again over Anne’s objection, that Willie wants to know. Adam seems also not to like Willie, thinking him to be an... (full context)
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...capitol, Jack overhears a conversation between Duffy and Sadie, in which Duffy claims that the Boss wants to put six million dollars of taxpayer money into the new free hospital he... (full context)
Chapter 6
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...OK, and although the girl’s father was angry and threatened to make the issue public, Willie threatened the man right back, saying that, as a trucker, his goods must run on... (full context)
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...in the meantime, that her son was becoming an overconfident and arrogant young man, and Willie again defended Tom, saying that Tom’s antics were doing little to distract from his dream... (full context)
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Willie then has a conversation with Jack, one evening in the governor’s mansion, after repelling yet... (full context)
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Jack tells Willie he understands this explanation, but also that, with six million dollars around, surely a bunch... (full context)
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...to win him over and to convince him to take the job as head of Willie’s free hospital. Adam hears out Jack’s proposal and denies flatly that he’ll do anything for... (full context)
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...to no avail—Adam says it would degrade himself and his work to do it for Willie’s hospital. Burden says he is leaving soon for Memphis to speak to a medium, Miss... (full context)
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...is urging him to take it, because she now comes to realize that working with Willie will bring the maximum good to the greatest number of people. Burden is shocked to... (full context)
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...haul him off to jail—only at this point Jack mentions that he works for the Boss, and that the cop could get in a lot of trouble for messing with Burden... (full context)
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...and five days letter Anne reports back to him that Adam will take the job Willie’s offering—that he is crushed by the idea that his own father, Governor Stanton, whom Adam... (full context)
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...to smear him. Burden agrees to do this. The next day, Burden goes with the Boss in the black Cadillac to talk with Adam. Willie gives Adam a long speech on... (full context)
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...then has an extended daydream, soon after this meeting with Adam, in which he recalls Willie’s energetic speech on the steps of the state capitol in 1936, during his impeachment crisis—Burden... (full context)
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...and when the cop nearly arrested him—Anne had come to Burden with the information that Willie wanted to hire Adam to run the hospital, and Burden had not first told Anne... (full context)
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...he is drawing up for the hospital, if Adam told Anne, before Burden did, that Willie had offered him the hospital job. Adam says that he did not, and Burden continues... (full context)
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Jack has no idea that Willie and Anne are having an affair, but now his gut-feeling makes sense—Willie told Anne himself... (full context)
Chapter 7
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Burden is so upset at the news that Anne is having an affair with Willie, he takes off from Baton Rouge in his car and drives, over the course of... (full context)
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...possessed Anne, though he loved her, he doesn’t understand why he can be angry at Willie for having an affair with her. Though he also knows that his memories regarding his... (full context)
Chapter 8
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Burden drives straight to Willie’s office and Willie asks where he’s been for nearly a week—Jack says he simply took... (full context)
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...night at his old hospital and who is also planning the building and opening of Willie’s new free hospital. Adam says he has a patient who is a catatonic schizophrenic in... (full context)
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...out in court, when the defense interrogates Adam, that Anne is having an affair with Willie. At this insinuation, Anne goes pale and recognizes that Burden is right—there can be no... (full context)
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Jack asks Anne why she began sleeping with Willie, and she says that she loves him, that she will do anything for him, and... (full context)
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Burden does eventually manage to convince Adam not to pursue charges against Coffee, on Willie’s urging—no one wants Adam to find out that his sister is having an affair with... (full context)
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...do with Tom, now in his second year as a student at LSU. Burden and Willie find out that Tom has gotten a girl named Sibyl Frey pregnant, and that her... (full context)
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But the Boss feels he has this Senate post wrapped up, and he’s not about to cede it... (full context)
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But Willie, in the meantime, has figured out a strategy for dealing with MacMurfee and Frey—he realizes... (full context)
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...it over overnight—but Irwin says, again, that his mind is made up, that Jack and Willie can’t pressure him, and that he hopes to see Jack soon under friendly terms. Irwin... (full context)
Chapter 9
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...his biological father, but he knows, also, that he has a job to do for Willie, and before long he reports back to the Boss that the Boss will now need... (full context)
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Meanwhile, after Irwin’s death, Jack has asked that his portfolio of assignments for Willie be limited to issues of policy, rather than of “politicking” or influence-trading. Willie places Jack... (full context)
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...and Gummy have achieved what they’ve always wanted—the lucrative contract to the free hospital, which Willie considered his untarnished political dream—a project that came not through bribery or influence-trading but through... (full context)
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But another terrible event occurs which throws off Jack’s and Willie’s plans, and which Jack acknowledges to be the event that bring about, through its consequences... (full context)
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Lucy joins Willie at the hospital—she has been living apart from Willie, still, but recognizes that this moment... (full context)
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Willie is led away by Lucy, who tells him he needs to rest, having been awake... (full context)
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...implying that she was a slut and a whore for carrying on a relationship with Willie—and that this relationship is the reason Adam was chosen to run the hospital. Adam seemed... (full context)
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Jack is unable to find Adam, however, and returns to the capitol to meet with Willie and determine what the Governor will do, now that the free hospital will no longer... (full context)
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...for a moment and turns back, he sees Adam, looking haggard and dirty, talking to Willie. Before Jack can realize what is happening, Adam shoots Willie several times in the chest—and... (full context)
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Jack then reports that Willie was taken to the hospital, the same one in which Tom also lies—he is tended... (full context)
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Jack ends the chapter by saying the Boss’s funeral was later that week, and was attended by an enormous part of the population... (full context)
Chapter 10
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...and so Jack has the house to himself. He begins thinking, after the commotion regarding Willie’s murder has died down somewhat, who could have been responsible for informing Adam of Anne’s... (full context)
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...Sadie Burke, who has checked into a sanatorium for her nerves in the wake of Willie’s death—she has nearly had a mental breakdown. Jack goes to the sanatorium to ask if... (full context)
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Sadie tells Jack that she wanted Willie killed, or at least punished, because she knew that Willie loved Anne and was prepared... (full context)
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Burden now begins wrapping up the narrative of his and Willie’s lives—he realizes that Sadie is right, that it is not worth publicizing the true nature... (full context)
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...it is the right thing to do for the memory of Tom as well as Willie. Lucy tells Jack that she named the child Willie because Willie Stark “was a great... (full context)