And Then There Were None

Pdf fan dd71f526917d6085d66d045bd94fb5b55d02a108dd45d836cbdd4abe2d4c043d Tap here to download this LitChart! (PDF)
Lombard was hired by Mr. Isaac Morris to come to Soldier Island and watch out for any trouble. He is a very resourceful and creative man who used to be a soldier in Africa. While in Africa he left a group of natives to die in order to save his own life. He is very clever and is able to escape death until the very end of the novel, when he trusts Vera too much because she is a woman.

Philip Lombard Quotes in And Then There Were None

The And Then There Were None quotes below are all either spoken by Philip Lombard or refer to Philip Lombard. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Justice Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Harper edition of And Then There Were None published in 2011.
Chapter 2 Quotes

The faded blue eyes, shrewd in spite of their age, sized up Lombard. For a moment a judgment showed in them – had there been anyone to read it.

Related Characters: Philip Lombard (speaker), Vera Claythorne, Philip Lombard
Page Number: 23
Explanation and Analysis:

As they wait for their taxi, Vera meets Lombard. She examines him closely, and both characters reveal deep skepticism of the other.

This interaction foreshadows the way that different characters will try to analyze each other’s behaviors and actions. Without any rationale, Vera is already paranoid about Lombard, while he similarly questions her role as a secretary. Their suspicions function as an analogy for what the reader of Christie’s novel is doing: gathering information about new characters to try to ultimately determine a suspect. Indeed her reference to “had there been anyone to read it” is a subtle wink to the novel’s reader—who, unlike the characters, can interpret such signals.

Christie's use of the word “them” is notably vague: it could refer to either Lombard or Vera’s eyes. In the first case, Vera would be seeing the judgment in Lombard’s eyes, while in the second, she would be revealing her own judgment. In a sense, both readings are correct, and Christie therefore uses a clever linguistic trick to establish an environment of deep suspicion and uncertainty among the characters, and even in the language of the text itself.

A+

Unlock explanations and citation info for this and every other And Then There Were None quote.

Plus so much more...

Get LitCharts A+
Already a LitCharts A+ member? Sign in!
Chapter 7 Quotes

“I mean – it explains Soldier Island. There are crimes that cannot be brought home to their perpetrators. Instance the Rogerses'. Another instance, old Wargrave, who committed his murder strictly within the law.”

Related Characters: Philip Lombard (speaker), Justice Wargrave, Thomas Rogers, Ethel Rogers
Related Symbols: The Island
Page Number: 114
Explanation and Analysis:

With Dr. Armstrong, Lombard reviews the information on the visitors to the island. He concludes that everyone who was invited is guilty of some form of murder.

Lombard articulates, here, the unifying concept for the island and for Christie’s text. He is thus the first character to be an effective detective, providing a model for the reader to follow as we take on a similar investigating role. Like any good reader, Lombard first reviews the information available to him and then makes a final pronouncement—“it explains”—that can connect all the threads of information.

The common feature for those who have been invited to the island deserves some consideration: The guests are not just murderers but rather ones whose crimes resist traditional methods of prosecution. They cannot be tried in normal courtrooms and thus the island becomes itself a pseudo-courtroom—a place where culpability is punished in a way that normal social regulations do not permit. Christie thus complicates the ethics of the ensuing murders, casting them as cruel but also as providing a form of vigilante justice that could not be dealt out elsewhere in society.

Chapter 10 Quotes

“I know very well that I'm not the murderer, and I don't fancy there's anything insane about you, Vera. You strike me as being one of the sanest most levelheaded girls I've come across. I'd stake my reputation on your sanity.

Related Characters: Philip Lombard (speaker), Vera Claythorne
Page Number: 168
Explanation and Analysis:

The characters have concluded that one of them must be the murderer but that there is no way to know who it could be. Vera asks Lombard who he suspects, and he responds that he believes it not to be her.

Although he lacks a rational reason to trust Vera, Lombard seems to confide in her entirely. His explanation focuses exclusively on her “sanity,” implying that he thinks the murders must be the result of mental instability. As a result, determining the psychological health of each character becomes of utmost importance, for the guilty person would be the most unstable. Just as Miss Brent offered the religious explanation of being possessed by the devil, Lombard relies on psychological analyses.

Despite this emphasis on mental stability, Lombard and Vera’s behavior is actually deeply irrational. They have no real reason to trust each other and seem to do so largely as a response to a stressful environment in which no other option for support is available. Thus even as Lombard asserts Vera’s steadiness, their interaction also foreshadows the way that these characters will become increasingly unstable—ever more likely to behave rashly as their paranoia grows.

Chapter 13 Quotes

Philip Lombard's senses seemed heightened, rather than diminished. His ears reacted to the slightest sound. His step was lighter and quicker, his body lithe and graceful. And he smiled often, his lips curling back from his long white teeth.

Related Characters: Philip Lombard
Page Number: 212
Explanation and Analysis:

After the lights go out, Lombard searches for candles. His movements are described as furtive and calculated.

This passage continues to make use of animal imagery to describe the altered way that the characters have begun to behave under stress. Although the psychological disturbance would seem to weaken them, instead Lombard finds himself “heightened, rather than diminished.” The physical disappearance of the lights thus serves as a metaphor for the way the characters have become increasingly disoriented. But instead of being immobilized by this event, Lombard becomes “lighter and quicker.” Language like “lithe and graceful,” in particular, casts his behavior to be like that of an animal. Christie thus highlights how the events that have transpired so far cause the characters to act less and less like humans.

Yet this image does not transform Lombard into just any animal. Rather the reference to his “lips curling back from his long white teeth” presents him as a predator. One might interpret this as a sign of his guilt, as evidence that he is the murderer preparing to strike on his victims. Yet the fact that similar language is applied to many such characters implies that they are all taking on increasingly predatory tactics: The psychological toil has turned them once more into potential murderers.

Chapter 16 Quotes

“Why did I never see his face properly before? A wolf – that's what it is – a wolf's face … Those horrible teeth …”

Related Characters: Vera Claythorne (speaker), Philip Lombard
Page Number: 262
Explanation and Analysis:

After seeing the dead body of Dr. Armstrong, Vera and Lombard both believe each other to be the killer. Vera looks with new eyes at Lombard and perceives an entirely different person.

Christie shows, here, just how radically the characters’ apprehensions of each other shift based on their psychological states. Though Lombard’s actual facial features have, of course, not changed, Vera identifies him in starkly different terms. Her use of the term “properly” implies a level of objectivity, asserting these to be his actual features—and thus showing how unaware Vera is of how warped her reality has become. That his features are animalistic, in particular, highlights that the characters have continued to shed their human qualities as the story has developed. Indeed, Vera adopts similar imagery as Lombard himself did while describing his own senses to become like a predator as he crept through the darkened house. That they both simultaneously use this language demonstrates how pervasive this animalism has become to the interior symbolism of the text. Thus it is not only the result of Vera’s psychological deterioration, but also a metaphorical structure employed by Christie to show how humans regress to a state of pure survival.

Get the entire And Then There Were None LitChart as a printable PDF.
And then there were none.pdf.medium

Philip Lombard Character Timeline in And Then There Were None

The timeline below shows where the character Philip Lombard appears in And Then There Were None. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1
Guilt Theme Icon
Philip Lombard looks at Vera from across the carriage and thinks her an attractive and practical looking... (full context)
Chapter 2
Guilt Theme Icon
...the guests at the train station. The guests start to introduce themselves to each other. Lombard remarks to Vera that it seems strange that she is taking up a secretarial post... (full context)
Justice Theme Icon
The house finally comes into view. It is a very modern house. Lombard comments that it must be difficult to land the boat in bad weather and Narracott... (full context)
Justice Theme Icon
Guilt Theme Icon
...leave the island, but the motorboat has left so he'll have to stay. He thinks Lombard is strange and lying about something. Lombard smiles to himself as he walks down the... (full context)
Chapter 3
Class Theme Icon
...after dinner. Wargrave is amusing, Mr. Blore (pretending to be Davis) discusses South Africa; Mr. Lombard continues to eye everyone suspiciously. Anthony Marston comments on the small soldier figurines placed in... (full context)
Guilt Theme Icon
...take Mrs. Rogers to bed. Marston says that the needs a drink and he and Lombard come back with some whiskey. Dr. Armstrong comes back and says he has given Mrs.... (full context)
Guilt Theme Icon
...the same information that was given in chapter one when each character was introduced, except Lombard who lies and says that a mutual friend of Mr. Owen invited him. (full context)
Chapter 4
Guilt Theme Icon
Death Theme Icon
Lombard explains that he got lost with some natives in Africa in the bush. He abandoned... (full context)
Chapter 6
Death Theme Icon
Everyone is downstairs for breakfast at nine o'clock. Vera and Lombard had walked up to the summit of the island to look down at the house.... (full context)
Guilt Theme Icon
Death Theme Icon
Outside, after breakfast, Lombard asks Blore what he thinks about the motorboat not arriving. Blore thinks that it is... (full context)
Chapter 7
Justice Theme Icon
Guilt Theme Icon
...if this means that Miss Brent believes the others are guilty. Brent says that besides Lombard who killed the natives and the Rogers, all the other stories seem rather ridiculous. (full context)
Justice Theme Icon
Guilt Theme Icon
Death Theme Icon
...He sees Wargrave but decides he doesn't want to speak with him and instead chooses Lombard. They go over the Rogers's story and Armstrong points out that Mr. and Mrs. Rogers... (full context)
Chapter 8
Guilt Theme Icon
Death Theme Icon
...way they decide to search the island and Blore asks if anyone has a revolver. Lombard says he does— he explains that he has gotten in “some tight places” before and... (full context)
Death Theme Icon
They look down the cliff and wonder if anyone could be there. Lombard suggests he should climb down and see if there are any hidden recesses in the... (full context)
Death Theme Icon
Blore comes back with a rope and Lombard has gone to test some theory. Armstrong tells Blore that he is worried that Macarthur... (full context)
Guilt Theme Icon
Death Theme Icon
The search ends and Blore, Lombard and Armstrong are all very dirty and dusty. There is no one on the island... (full context)
Chapter 9
Guilt Theme Icon
Death Theme Icon
Lombard says that they must have been wrong – the deaths were just coincidences. Blore asks... (full context)
Guilt Theme Icon
Death Theme Icon
Blore then turns on Lombard and asks why he brought a revolver on a social visit. Lombard says that he... (full context)
Justice Theme Icon
Death Theme Icon
Class Theme Icon
...cold ham and cold tongue along with other things he could find in the pantry. Lombard asks whether they have enough food and Rogers responds that they have more than enough. (full context)
Guilt Theme Icon
Death Theme Icon
Class Theme Icon
...theory is true: one of them is possessed by the devil. Blore blurts out that Lombard has a revolver and Lombard explains why he does. Lombard then says that the women... (full context)
Chapter 10
Death Theme Icon
Vera asks Lombard to wake her up so she can realize that this is all a bad dream,... (full context)
Justice Theme Icon
Vera says she can't see Lombard as the murderer either. Lombard thinks that it is Wargrave because he has played God... (full context)
Chapter 11
Death Theme Icon
Lombard wakes early, goes back to bed, and by 9:30 am is sitting in his bed,... (full context)
Death Theme Icon
Blore comments to Lombard that he finds it suspicious that Vera cracked up and then immediately calmed down, and... (full context)
Justice Theme Icon
Guilt Theme Icon
Death Theme Icon
Lombard adds that he's glad Blore no longer suspects him. Lombard then asks Blore for more... (full context)
Guilt Theme Icon
Death Theme Icon
Blore says he's not going to die like the others, but Lombard responds that he will because he has no imagination. Lombard adds that he himself has... (full context)
Chapter 12
Death Theme Icon
...hypodermic syringe in her neck. There is also a bee buzzing in the room and Lombard says this is the mark of the creativity of the killer because the verse of... (full context)
Death Theme Icon
...in a safe place and then search every person and room. After some resistance from Lombard who doesn't want to give up his revolver, they all agree. (full context)
Death Theme Icon
When Lombard goes to check his drawer where the revolver is kept he realizes that it is... (full context)
Chapter 13
Death Theme Icon
Armstrong wants to do something, anything and Lombard thinks that the weather will clear up at some point and then they can try... (full context)
Death Theme Icon
Class Theme Icon
...the lights on since Rogers died. Wargrave has seen some candles in the larder and Lombard goes to get them. (full context)
Death Theme Icon
...about to drink it she refuses to because she doesn't know where it came from. Lombard tells her she has her wits about her, even after her fright. Lombard says that... (full context)
Death Theme Icon
Lombard remarks that Wargrave's act of playing court is over. Vera says that just this morning... (full context)
Chapter 14
Death Theme Icon
...planted in Vera's room to get them all up there so they would be distracted. Lombard says that they weren't able to hear the shot because of Vera's screaming, the howling... (full context)
Death Theme Icon
In his room Lombard looks in the mirror and thinks that this insane island has started to get to... (full context)
Death Theme Icon
There is no answer on Armstrong's door, Lombard responds at once as does Vera. Blore explains to Lombard and they go check on... (full context)
Death Theme Icon
Blore says to Lombard that they should be careful because Armstrong must have the revolver, but then Lombard reveals... (full context)
Death Theme Icon
...to write in her diary but all of a sudden hears footsteps. Finally she hears Lombard and Blore asking to come in. They tell her that Armstrong has disappeared. (full context)
Death Theme Icon
Lombard and Blore have looked all over both the island and the house cannot find Armstrong... (full context)
Chapter 15
Death Theme Icon
...sit eating breakfast in the kitchen. It is a sunny day. The storm has passed. Lombard suggests that they should try to signal the mainland for help using a mirror. But... (full context)
Death Theme Icon
...wonders: by whom? Blore says he doesn't know but what he does know is that Lombard has the revolver, and maybe he has had the revolver for the whole time. Lombard... (full context)
Death Theme Icon
...that the only fair thing to do now is lock up the revolver and both Lombard and Blore can hold a key. Vera says that they are both acting like idiots... (full context)
Death Theme Icon
Class Theme Icon
...have to go back in for the night. Vera says she can't bear it and Lombard tells her that she will be safe enough locked in her room. (full context)
Death Theme Icon
...the house alone to get some food. Vera thinks that this is very risky but Lombard tells her that Armstrong is unarmed so it can't be too dangerous. (full context)
Guilt Theme Icon
Death Theme Icon
Class Theme Icon
Lombard starts to tell Vera that Blore's story about Armstrong and the footsteps clears both of... (full context)
Death Theme Icon
Lombard says that with his revolver he is going to take good care that Blore doesn't... (full context)
Guilt Theme Icon
Death Theme Icon
...that administered Absolute Justice, but in fact the judges didn't come from the natural world. Lombard responds that he doesn't believe in the supernatural. Lombard then asks if Vera actually did... (full context)
Guilt Theme Icon
Death Theme Icon
Lombard says that Armstrong must be in the house and that he is going to go... (full context)
Death Theme Icon
Lombard decides that they should find a high place on the island and stay awake all... (full context)
Chapter 16
Guilt Theme Icon
Death Theme Icon
Vera and Lombard slowly look up at each other. They realize that there is no one on the... (full context)
Guilt Theme Icon
Death Theme Icon
Lombard says that this is the end. He says it almost with acceptance, but Vera only... (full context)
Guilt Theme Icon
Death Theme Icon
As they get him past the reach of the sea, Lombard asks if Vera is satisfied and she says she is. She shows him his revolver,... (full context)
Epilogue 1
Justice Theme Icon
Guilt Theme Icon
Death Theme Icon
...survivors. Legge wants to know who killed them, but there's very little evidence. Wargrave and Lombard were shot, Miss Brent and Marston died of cyanide poisoning, Mrs. Rogers died of an... (full context)
Guilt Theme Icon
Death Theme Icon
...was dragged above the high water line. Then the people left were Vera, Blore and Lombard. (full context)
Guilt Theme Icon
Death Theme Icon
...on it. Then it seems like Vera could have pushed the statue on Blore, shot Lombard and hung herself. But there is one problem with this theory: the chair wasn't found... (full context)
Epilogue 2
Justice Theme Icon
Guilt Theme Icon
Death Theme Icon
...the legal system and a man who had returned from the Amazon told him about Lombard. (full context)
Justice Theme Icon
Guilt Theme Icon
Death Theme Icon
...his murders. He chose Armstrong because he knew Armstrong was a gullible man. Armstrong suspected Lombard, and Wargrave pretended to agree with him. He said that he had a scheme to... (full context)
Justice Theme Icon
Guilt Theme Icon
Death Theme Icon
...Rogers while he was chopping sticks. While they were looking for Rogers, Wargrave slipped into Lombard's room and stole his revolver. And at breakfast he slipped the last bit of chloral... (full context)
Guilt Theme Icon
Death Theme Icon
Wargrave then writes that he forgot to mention that he returned the revolver to Lombard's room. He had hidden it in a food tin at the bottom of the pantry.... (full context)
Death Theme Icon
...house, Wargrave pushed the marble clock onto him. From the window he watched Vera shoot Lombard and then wondered excitedly whether she would play into the stage he set for her... (full context)