Atonement

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Lola Quincy Character Analysis

Briony’s blasé cousin, two years her senior. She is raped by Paul Marshall, and is so shaken by the assault that she accepts Briony’s assertion that Robbie Turner was the culprit even though it seems clear that she knows that Paul was her assailant. Lola later marries Paul, despite the fact that she raped her, in what is implied is a kind of agreement to both hide their complicity in Robbie’s false indictment and because marriage to Paul will make her wealthy. She becomes a well-known London socialite.

Lola Quincy Quotes in Atonement

The Atonement quotes below are all either spoken by Lola Quincy or refer to Lola Quincy . For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
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). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Anchor Books edition of Atonement published in 2003.
Part 1, Chapter 5 Quotes

[The twins] watched [Lola’s] tongue turn green as it curled around the edges of the candy casing. Paul Marshall sat back in the armchair, watching her closely over the steeple he made with his hands in front of his face. He crossed and uncrossed his legs. Then he took a deep breath. ‘Bite it,’ he said softly. ‘You’ve got to bite it.’ It cracked loudly as it yielded to her unblemished incisors, and there was revealed the white edge of the sugar shell, and the dark chocolate beneath it.

Related Characters: Paul Marshall (speaker), Lola Quincy , Pierrot and Jackson Quincey
Related Symbols: Amo Bars
Page Number: 59
Explanation and Analysis:

Paul Marshall has given Lola an Amo bar, the candy bars that are the source of his family's fortune. Here, we are meant to be struck by the attraction that Paul evidently feels towards Lola. This attraction has undeniably sexual overtones, rather than being an innocent friendship or flirtation (although Lola's innocence - "her unblemished incisors" - is contrasted to the lustful, domineering Paul). But what makes his attitude especially uncomfortable is the position of power that he holds over both Lola and the Quincey boys. Paul is confident and self-assured: he comes from money and power and handles both with ease. These attributes have given him a sense that he can do what he'd like and doesn't need to monitor his own behavior towards other people - particularly women or those from a lower social class.

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Part 1, Chapter 6 Quotes

Poor darling Briony, the softest little thing, doing her all to entertain her hard-bitten wiry cousins with the play she had written from her heart. To love her was to be soothed. But how to protect her against failure, against that Lola, the incarnation of Emily’s youngest sister who had been just as precocious and scheming at that age, and who had recently plotted her way out of a marriage, into what she wanted everyone to call a nervous breakdown.

Related Characters: Briony Tallis, Lola Quincy , Emily Tallis
Related Symbols: The Trials of Arabella
Page Number: 62
Explanation and Analysis:

The book shifts in perspective once again to the viewpoint of Briony and Cecilia's mother, Emily, who suffers from severe migraines and retreats periodically to her room to rest and to think. In this passage, the narration takes on the stream of Emily's consciousness as she considers Briony and what she sees as the potentially damaging power that Lola holds over her (just as, presumably, Lola's mother held power over Emily herself when they were children).

Although Emily is one of the few adults whose perspective is described, at least at this point in the novel, her limited view on what is really going on between Briony, Lola, and the others only further underlines how little any one person can claim to be all-knowing. Emily does think of Briony as naive, but not in the harmful way that we have seen - rather, for her Briony's innocence is something to be cherished and protected against the evil that only exists beyond her.

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Lola Quincy Character Timeline in Atonement

The timeline below shows where the character Lola Quincy appears in Atonement. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 1, Chapter 1
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Briony’s cousins, the Quinceys—15-year-old Lola, and her nine-year-old twin brothers, Jackson and Pierrot—will be staying with her family to escape... (full context)
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...returns to her room and wonders how she will cast her play. She rationalizes that Lola’s colorful, freckled complexion makes her ineligible to star as Arabella, and considers herself better suited... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 3
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...has wasted valuable rehearsal time. Meanwhile, Briony attempts to direct her cousins, and finds that Lola treats her with deep condescension. Later, Briony sits by herself and wonders if anyone else... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 5
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To Lola’s and the twins’ puzzlement, Briony cancels the rehearsals for The Trials of Arabella. Lola walks... (full context)
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...Quincey children. He mentions that he has read about their parents in the paper, but Lola tersely discourages him from mentioning any of the drama in front of her young siblings. (full context)
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Paul takes a nap on his bed and awakes to see Lola and the twins in the room across from his. He notices that Lola is an... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 7
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...temple as she hits the lakeside nettles in frustration. She imagines some of nettles are Lola and the twins and strikes them down with a tree branch. Briony moves on and... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 10
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Lola comes by Briony’s room and sits on Briony’s bed. She is covered in scratches and... (full context)
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As Lola cleans up, Briony tells her of her interaction with Robbie, and the salacious contents of... (full context)
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As Lola continues to get ready, Briony descends to dinner and considers what strategy will be best... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 11
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...twins are. Briony tells him this view is mistaken, and points out the scratches that Lola suffered at their hands. Emily seems shocked by her niece’s wounds. Paul volunteers that he... (full context)
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As the family tends to Lola’s wounds, Briony finds an envelope left on Jackson’s seat. Emily demands that she not open... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 12
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Emily prepares to telephone PC Vockins, the village constable. She thinks more about Lola’s injuries and feels little sympathy, because Lola reminds her of her scene-stealing sister Hermione. She... (full context)
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Suddenly, Leon, Cecilia, and Briony enter, comforting a ghostly pale Lola. Leon reaches for the phone and tells his father to come home. He seems furious,... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 13
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...into the darkness, the other of whom stays seated and calls for Briony. It is Lola, who sounds helpless. (full context)
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Briony now feels that she completely understands what has happened. She rushes to comfort Lola, and tells her that she saw Lola being assaulted. She asks Lola who did it,... (full context)
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Lola then explains how her assault transpired. Briony emphasizes her conviction that she saw Robbie do... (full context)
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Briony leads Lola back to the house. She hears Leon’s voice, and her brother comes heroically to pick... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 14
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...court will trouble her less than her patchy memory of the fateful night itself. Once Lola has been taken away to be examined, Briony is left at “centre stage,” and she... (full context)
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The gathered people receive word that Lola has been sedated and is now able to sleep. Everyone waits in the drawing room... (full context)
Part 3
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A letter from Briony’s father reveals that Paul and Lola are to be married the following week. Briony processes this news, and realizes that she... (full context)
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...a stately brick barn with a Rolls-Royce parked outside. She enters; it is Paul and Lola’s small, private wedding ceremony. Briony feels that she does not belong there. (full context)
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Briony sees Paul and Lola at the altar and remembers seeing young, vulnerable Lola with the injuries she suffered at... (full context)
Epilogue
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...at the museum, she sees a black Rolls-Royce parked outside, which evokes memories of the Marshalls. Paul and Lola are now high-ranking socialites, actively involved in charity. As Briony walks up... (full context)
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...ascends in the elevator to the archives, Briony reflects that while she may outlive Paul, Lola will very likely outlive her. This means that Briony will not be able to publish... (full context)
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...memoir have never resulted in a publication, because it would be considered libelous to the Marshalls, who are known to be very litigious. Until the subjects of the book are dead,... (full context)
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...Cecilia perished in the bombing of Balham Underground shortly thereafter. The visit to Cecilia’s after Lola’s wedding was a fabrication. This sad ending seems, to Briony, to be a disservice. (full context)