Atonement

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Pierrot and Jackson Quincey Character Analysis

Pierrot and Jackson are Lola’s twin younger brothers. At the book’s beginning, they appear as rowdy and capricious preadolescent boys, and the drama that takes place passes over their heads. Pierrot returns at the end of the book, when he leads his grandchildren in a performance of Briony’s play, The Tales of Arabella, to honor Briony’s birthday.

Pierrot and Jackson Quincey Quotes in Atonement

The Atonement quotes below are all either spoken by Pierrot and Jackson Quincey or refer to Pierrot and Jackson Quincey. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
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). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Anchor Books edition of Atonement published in 2003.
Part 1, Chapter 5 Quotes

[The twins] watched [Lola’s] tongue turn green as it curled around the edges of the candy casing. Paul Marshall sat back in the armchair, watching her closely over the steeple he made with his hands in front of his face. He crossed and uncrossed his legs. Then he took a deep breath. ‘Bite it,’ he said softly. ‘You’ve got to bite it.’ It cracked loudly as it yielded to her unblemished incisors, and there was revealed the white edge of the sugar shell, and the dark chocolate beneath it.

Related Characters: Paul Marshall (speaker), Lola Quincy , Pierrot and Jackson Quincey
Related Symbols: Amo Bars
Page Number: 59
Explanation and Analysis:

Paul Marshall has given Lola an Amo bar, the candy bars that are the source of his family's fortune. Here, we are meant to be struck by the attraction that Paul evidently feels towards Lola. This attraction has undeniably sexual overtones, rather than being an innocent friendship or flirtation (although Lola's innocence - "her unblemished incisors" - is contrasted to the lustful, domineering Paul). But what makes his attitude especially uncomfortable is the position of power that he holds over both Lola and the Quincey boys. Paul is confident and self-assured: he comes from money and power and handles both with ease. These attributes have given him a sense that he can do what he'd like and doesn't need to monitor his own behavior towards other people - particularly women or those from a lower social class.

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Part 1, Chapter 14 Quotes

Briony’s immediate feeling was one of relief that the boys were safe. But as she looked at Robbie waiting calmly, she experienced a flash of outrage. Did he believe he could conceal his crime behind an apparent kindness, behind this show of being the good shepherd? This was surely a cynical attempt to win forgiveness for what could never be forgiven. She was confirmed again in her view that evil was complicated and misleading.

Related Characters: Briony Tallis, Robbie Turner, Pierrot and Jackson Quincey
Page Number: 171
Explanation and Analysis:

Finally, after hours, Robbie returns home, and he is carrying the twins with him. As Briony watches him, it becomes clear just how much her own narrative construction of the night influences how she perceives reality - and influences reality itself. No longer is Briony hesitating internally, patching over her mental doubts by reiterating her testimony again and again. Now she appears to really believe the story she has told, so much so that she is the one who is angry at the guilt that she has assigned to Robbie.

Briony believes that her conclusions are part of her process of growing up and maturing, gaining a more complete perspective of the adult world with all the evil it entails. Of course, we as readers recognize that Briony's presumed maturity is no more than another kind of innocence, though one that is powerful and threatening in nature.

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Pierrot and Jackson Quincey Character Timeline in Atonement

The timeline below shows where the character Pierrot and Jackson Quincey appears in Atonement. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 1, Chapter 1
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Briony’s cousins, the Quinceys—15-year-old Lola, and her nine-year-old twin brothers, Jackson and Pierrot—will be staying with her family to escape a feud between their separating parents.... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 3
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Briony’s attempts to direct her play have been held up: Jackson wet his bed and was forced to wash the sheets as punishment, which has wasted... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 5
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...they confess tearfully that they are unhappy away from their parents. She comforts them, and Jackson speaks explicitly about their parents’ divorce. Lola reprimands him sharply. (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 6
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...on Hermione’s self-indulgent abandonment of her children, and vows that she will take care of Jackson and Pierrot “only out of duty.” Emily continues to plan the rest of her errands,... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 9
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...on an ensemble and finishing her hair and makeup, she exits her room to find Jackson and Pierrot in tears over being unable to find their socks. She comforts the boys... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 11
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...a scratch on his face. Robbie continues the exchange by asking about the weather, and Pierrot, who is seated next to him, thinks he is expected to respond but is too... (full context)
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Briony tells Robbie to leave Pierrot alone. Mrs. Tallis asks her daughter to apologize, as Robbie’s remark was perfectly harmless. Briony... (full context)
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The narration fast-forwards back to the dinner. Jackson and Pierrot whisper to one another and then leave to go to the bathroom. As... (full context)
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As the family tends to Lola’s wounds, Briony finds an envelope left on Jackson’s seat. Emily demands that she not open the letter. Once her daughter has handed it... (full context)
Epilogue
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...few of whom she recognizes. She sees Leon, who is doddering and wheelchair-bound, and greets Pierrot. She meets many generations of offspring, including the scions of Jackson, who died 15 years... (full context)