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Chapter 14

The color-coded boxes under "Analysis & Themes" below make it easy to track the themes throughout the work. Each color corresponds to one of the themes explained in the Themes section of this LitChart.

Summary


Analysis & Themes


John rushes into the Park Lane Hospital for the Dying, where Linda is staying. The nurse matter-of-factly says there's no hope of recovery. When John says Linda is his mother, the nurse blushes.

The Nurse is conditioned to speak about death as if it's nothing, but the word "mother" she can't handle.

 

Linda is so drugged on soma she barely notices John. As John weeps, the nurse leads a group of Bokanovsky twins into the room. They stare at Linda and make nasty comments about her ugliness. John, furious, pushes them away. The Nurse warns him not to interrupt the children's death-conditioning.

In World State society, the needs of the community outweigh the rights or cares of the individual.

 

John returns to Linda, who thinks he's Popé. It's too much for John: he shakes his mother, who stops breathing, and dies. John blames himself, falls to his knees and begins to sob. To stop this display of sadness from harming the children's conditioning, the Nurse gives all the kids chocolate éclairs.

Only stability is sacred in World State society. Conditioning makes World State citizens avoid intense emotions and connections at all costs.

 

John sobs, "God, god, god..." Five twins ask what he's saying, and ask if Linda is dead. John pushes them out of the way and leaves the room.

The "God" to whom John calls doesn't exist in the World State. The Bokanovsky twins don't recognize the word "God."