Candide

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The Young Baron Character Analysis

Cunégonde's brother, and the heir to the Barony of Thunder-ten-tronckh. Almost killed by the Bulgarians, he revives and becomes the Jesuit Reverend-Commander in Paraguay. Though Candide rescues him and his sister several times, he fanatically opposes Candide's marriage to Cunégonde, because Candide is not noble. The Young Baron represents the aristocracy and its stubborn privileges.

The Young Baron Quotes in Candide

The Candide quotes below are all either spoken by The Young Baron or refer to The Young Baron. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Optimism and Disillusion Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Dover Publications edition of Candide published in 1991.
Chapter 15 Quotes

“Reverend Father, all the quarterings in the world signify nothing; I rescued your sister from the arms of a Jew and of an Inquisitor; she has great obligations to me, she wishes to marry me; Master Pangloss always told me that all men are equal, and certainly I will marry her.”

Related Characters: Candide (speaker), Pangloss, The Young Baron
Page Number: 36
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Candide prepares to rescue Cunegonde from the hands of her "owner," Don Fernando. Candide offhandedly mentions that he hopes to marry Cunegonde one day, a statement that Cunegonde's brother, the Young Baron, finds absurd. The Young Baron insists that Candide is not nobly born, and therefore not worthy to marry an aristocratic lady like his sister. Candide replies that he's always been taught that all men are created equal; therefore, he's a perfectly suitable match for Cunegonde.

The passage is an interesting example of how Candide, in spite of his naivete and occasional foolishness, has some pretty good ideas (and Voltaire just uses Candide's naïveté to show the bad ideas human society has come up with). Candide thinks this is the best of all possible worlds, an idea that Voltaire clearly finds laughable, and yet he also believes in a classic Enlightenment tenet: all men are equal (an idea that Voltaire believes whole-heartedly).The Young Baron comes across as a comically irate, conceited character, so obsessed with genealogy and blood that he hesitates to save his own sister from capture (capture from the eminently aristocratic Don Fernando, by the way).

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The Young Baron Character Timeline in Candide

The timeline below shows where the character The Young Baron appears in Candide. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 14
Optimism and Disillusion Theme Icon
When they arrive, Candide is told that the Reverend Commandant does not speak with Spaniards. When the Reverend Commandant learns that Candide is not a... (full context)
Chapter 15
Optimism and Disillusion Theme Icon
Religion and Philosophy vs. The World Theme Icon
The Reverend Commandant tells the story of his survival of the Bulgarian attack. Thought to be dead, he... (full context)
The Enlightenment and Social Criticism Theme Icon
Religion and Philosophy vs. The World Theme Icon
Love and Women Theme Icon
The Commandant expresses the hope that he and Candide might be able to rescue Cunégonde from the... (full context)
Chapter 16
The Enlightenment and Social Criticism Theme Icon
Love and Women Theme Icon
...and also that this is appropriate penance for having killed the Inquisitor and the Jesuit Commandant. To his great surprise, the women begin weeping over the slain monkeys, who turn out... (full context)
Chapter 27
Optimism and Disillusion Theme Icon
...the relative unhappiness of individuals. Halfway through the voyage, Candide discovers that Pangloss and the Young Baron —thought dead—are slaves on the galley. As soon as they reach the shore, Candide pays... (full context)
Chapter 28
The Enlightenment and Social Criticism Theme Icon
Religion and Philosophy vs. The World Theme Icon
The Young Baron and Pangloss tell Candide and Martin how they each ended up enslaved. Soon after recovering... (full context)
Optimism and Disillusion Theme Icon
Religion and Philosophy vs. The World Theme Icon
...by a woman in a mosque. He was assigned to the same galley as the Young Baron , and by the time Candide found him, the two had been arguing endlessly over... (full context)
Chapter 29
Optimism and Disillusion Theme Icon
The Enlightenment and Social Criticism Theme Icon
Love and Women Theme Icon
Finally, Candide, Martin, Pangloss, Cacambo and the Young Baron arrive at the palace where Cunégonde and the old woman work as servants. As Cacambo... (full context)
Conclusion
Optimism and Disillusion Theme Icon
The Enlightenment and Social Criticism Theme Icon
Love and Women Theme Icon
Though he no longer wants to marry Cunégonde, the stubbornness of the Young Baron 's opposition causes Candide to do it anyway. He has the Baron sent back to... (full context)