Chronicle of a Death Foretold

Pdf fan Tap here to download this LitChart! (PDF)

Bayardo San Román Character Analysis

Bayardo San Román is a wealthy outsider to the town, and his reasons for coming to the town remain mysterious to the last. He is the son of General Petronio San Román, a hero of “civil wars” that occurred in the past and are never explained in depth. He is also a member of the ruling conservative regime. Bayardo is dashing, and something of a dandy—he wears only the finest clothes. Though he is well-mannered, he can be impulsive and ostentatious with his money. The Narrator believes him to be a fundamentally sad individual. Bayardo falls in love with Angela Vicario, but after discovering her lack of virginity on their wedding night he returns her to her family and falls into a deep depression. He disappears from the town, only to return decades later to Angela’s doorstep.

Bayardo San Román Quotes in Chronicle of a Death Foretold

The Chronicle of a Death Foretold quotes below are all either spoken by Bayardo San Román or refer to Bayardo San Román. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Fate vs. Free Will Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Vintage Books edition of Chronicle of a Death Foretold published in 0.
Chapter 2 Quotes

I met him a short while after she did, when I came home for Christmas vacation, and I found him just as strange as they had said. He seemed attractive, certainly, but far from Magdalena Oliver's idyllic vision. He seemed more serious to me than his antics would have led one to believe, and with a hidden tension that was barely concealed by his excessive good manners.

Related Characters: The Narrator (speaker), Bayardo San Román
Page Number: 28
Explanation and Analysis:

Here the Narrator remembers meeting the outsider Bayardo San Román for the first time, after hearing his mother sing the man’s praises for months. The Narrator has already heard how impressive Bayardo is to the townspeople—how wealthy and charming and ostentatious. For the Narrator, however, Bayardo leaves a different, quite darker impression. The disconnect between Bayardo’s theatrical “antics” and his profound seriousness, his “hidden tension,” makes Bayardo seem unpredictable to the Narrator, perhaps dangerous. When someone’s public self does not match up with his private self—his secret prejudices and convictions—there’s no telling what he may do. Of course, Bayardo is not the only one in the community who suffers from such a disconnect. In a town so caught up on ritual and custom, nearly everyone experiences a gap between their internal life and the social role they are expected to fulfill.

A+

Unlock explanations and citation info for this and every other Chronicle of a Death Foretold quote.

Plus so much more...

Get LitCharts A+
Already a LitCharts A+ member? Sign in!

They insisted that even the most difficult of husbands resigned themselves to anything as long as nobody knew about it. They convinced her, finally, that most men came to their wedding night so frightened that they were incapable of doing anything without the woman's help, and at the moment of truth they couldn't answer for their own acts. “The only thing they believe is what they see on the sheet,” they told her. And they taught her old wives’ tricks to feign her lost possession, so that on her first morning as a newlywed she could display open under the sun in the courtyard of her house the linen sheet with the stain of honor.

Related Characters: The Narrator (speaker), Angela Vicario, Bayardo San Román
Page Number: 38
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Angela Vicario’s closest confidants try to coach her on how to conceal her lack of virginity from Bayardo, and reassure her in no uncertain terms that the town’s obsession with virginity is merely a performance. According to Angela’s friends, just keeping up the appearance of virginity is really all that is expected of a new bride. Even in the unlikely event that her husband is perceptive enough to notice her lack of virginity, he won’t say anything for fear of public embarrassment. In fact, it seems that public opinion is far more important than the private truth in this town, as illustrated by the custom of hanging the bloody wedding sheets outside in the sun, for all to see. The Narrator’s reference to “the stain of honor” also draws an intimate connection between Angela’s virginity (or lack thereof) and the violence that eventually befalls Santiago. Santiago’s bloody, public demise is in some ways a substitute for the bloody sheet, which, of course, Angela never puts on display.

Chapter 4 Quotes

For the immense majority of people there was only one victim: Bayardo San Román. They took it for granted that the other actors in the tragedy had been fulfilling with dignity, and even with a certain grandeur, their part of the destiny that life had assigned them.

Related Characters: The Narrator (speaker), Bayardo San Román
Page Number: 83
Explanation and Analysis:

Here the Narrator explains that, in the days following the murder, Santiago’s burial, the arrest of the Vicario twins, and the flight of the Vicario family, the townspeople reserve all of their pity for Bayardo, who is arguably left the most unscathed by the tragedy. Their concern for him illustrates their bizarre, arguably backwards value system, and their obsession with honor and dignity at the expense of common humanity. To the townspeople, Angela, Santiago, and the Vicario twins are actors, and they are to be congratulated for how well they played their roles—never mind if the performance essentially cost all of them their lives.

Get the entire Death Foretold LitChart as a printable PDF.
Chronicle of a death foretold.pdf.medium

Bayardo San Román Character Timeline in Chronicle of a Death Foretold

The timeline below shows where the character Bayardo San Román appears in Chronicle of a Death Foretold. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1
The Sacred and the Profane Theme Icon
Gender, Class, and Social Restrictions Theme Icon
Violence, Trauma, and Community Theme Icon
...married the night before, has been returned to her parents by her husband, the dashing Bayardo San Román, after he discovered that she was not a virgin. Now Pablo and Pedro... (full context)
Chapter 2
Fact, Fiction, and Memory Theme Icon
Gender, Class, and Social Restrictions Theme Icon
The Narrator begins by recounting the arrival of Bayardo San Román, the man who marries Angela Vicario. Bayardo first appears, apparently at random, on... (full context)
Fate vs. Free Will Theme Icon
Fact, Fiction, and Memory Theme Icon
Gender, Class, and Social Restrictions Theme Icon
There is some confusion in the public memory about how and when Bayardo San Román decided he wanted to marry Angela Vicario. Some claim that Bayardo, sitting on... (full context)
Fact, Fiction, and Memory Theme Icon
The Sacred and the Profane Theme Icon
Gender, Class, and Social Restrictions Theme Icon
Others say that Bayardo San Román first sawAngela Vicario at a charity bazaar. A music box was being raffled... (full context)
The Sacred and the Profane Theme Icon
Gender, Class, and Social Restrictions Theme Icon
Ritual Theme Icon
...a nun.” Angela is the youngest of four daughters, one of whom is dead; when Bayardofirst arrives, the Vicario women are “still observing a mourning that [is] relaxed in the house... (full context)
Gender, Class, and Social Restrictions Theme Icon
Violence, Trauma, and Community Theme Icon
Still, the Vicario family is excited when Bayardo expresses interest. Pura Vicario(Purísima) is less excited, but agrees to arrange the marriage if Bayardo... (full context)
Gender, Class, and Social Restrictions Theme Icon
Ritual Theme Icon
...Vicario is the only one left who is apprehensive about the marriage. She doesn’t love Bayardo, and has had no say in the matter. It is a short engagement, however, due... (full context)
Gender, Class, and Social Restrictions Theme Icon
Bayardo asks Angela which house in the town she likes best. She answers casually that the... (full context)
The Sacred and the Profane Theme Icon
Gender, Class, and Social Restrictions Theme Icon
The wedding ends up being the largest the town has ever seen, thanks mostly to Bayardo’s extravagance. Still, Pura Vicario insists on hosting the reception on the terrace of her own... (full context)
Fate vs. Free Will Theme Icon
Fact, Fiction, and Memory Theme Icon
The Sacred and the Profane Theme Icon
Gender, Class, and Social Restrictions Theme Icon
Violence, Trauma, and Community Theme Icon
Ritual Theme Icon
...middle of the night, Pura Vicario is awakened by a knock on the door. It’s Bayardo San Román. Angela Vicario is standing beside him, her dress in tatters. To Pura they... (full context)
Chapter 4
Fate vs. Free Will Theme Icon
Fact, Fiction, and Memory Theme Icon
Gender, Class, and Social Restrictions Theme Icon
Violence, Trauma, and Community Theme Icon
Ritual Theme Icon
Suddenly, everyone in town remembers Bayardo San Román. Colonel Aponte takes a patrol up to the widower Xius’ house, and finds... (full context)
Fate vs. Free Will Theme Icon
The Sacred and the Profane Theme Icon
Gender, Class, and Social Restrictions Theme Icon
Ritual Theme Icon
...she couldn’t bring herself to try the tricks her friends had suggested she use on Bayardo—to do so seemed indecent. Then she recalls that, when her mother started beating her, she... (full context)
Fate vs. Free Will Theme Icon
Gender, Class, and Social Restrictions Theme Icon
Ritual Theme Icon
...tells the narrator that, after their encounter in the hotel, she began writing letters to Bayardo. He never replied, but Angela found that the more she wrote to him, and the... (full context)