Crime and Punishment

Crime and Punishment

Pdf fan dd71f526917d6085d66d045bd94fb5b55d02a108dd45d836cbdd4abe2d4c043d Tap here to download this LitChart! (PDF)

Crime and Punishment Part 3, Chapter 4 Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
Sonya arrives at Raskolnikov's apartment, abashedly, and Raskolnikov realizes that her arrival in the room seems to indicate that they are on close terms, which in fact they are not. Raskolnikov nevertheless invites her in and asks her to sit. Sonya brings a message from Katerina, that Raskolnikov be so kind as to attend Marmeladov’s funeral the following morning. Sonya says her mother will also be preparing a funeral meal with Raskolnikov’s money. Pulcheria and Dunya leave together.
Sonya recognizes that Raskolnikov has done the family a great service in providing money for Marmeladov’s funeral and memorial feast. Although Pulcheria in particular distrusts Sonya because of her low position in society, Sonya will go on to become Raskolnikov’s biggest source of support, and, ultimately, his companion in Siberian exile.
Themes
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Outside, Pulcheria tells Dunya that Raskolnikov appears quite ill. Pulcheria believes that Sonya might be at the root of her son’s troubles, but Dunya blames Luzhin for planting this idea in her mother’s head. Back in Raskolnikov’s room, Sonya stays while Razumikhin tells his friend that Porfiry, the investigator, is interviewing those who have pawned items with the old crone. Raskolnikov admits that he pawned some items there and tells Razumikhin he fears these items might have been stolen by the murderer. They resolve to see Porfiry.
Porfiry’s entry into the narrative. It was only a matter of time before it became apparent that Raskolnikov was a customer of the old woman’s. Razumikhin, as is his custom, suspects nothing of his friend and thinks Raskolnikov should meet with Porfiry to provide whatever information he can. Raskolnikov is nervous, but he feels it is best to speak to Porfiry and show he has “nothing to hide.”
Themes
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
Sonya thanks Raskolnikov again for his kindness. Raskolnikov promises to visit Sonya, which makes her nervous because she lives in such a small room. A man of about fifty follows Sonya home, and when she reaches her building, he announces, oddly, to her that it is his third day in Petersburg, and they are neighbors in the Kapernaumovs’ house.
This man turns out to be Svidrigailov, one of Raskolnikov’s antagonists (Porfiry is the other). Svidrigailov will shadow Raskolnikov for the remainder of the novel, with serious consequences for Raskolnikov and for Sonya.
Themes
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Walking to Porfiry’s, Razumikhin is curious about when Raskolnikov pawned items at the old crone’s, and seems reassured to note that his friend’s ravings regarding the murder might be traced to his business relationship with the woman. Raskolnikov grows nervous as they approach Porfiry’s office, and tells himself he must act naturally and betray no special interest in the case. Raskolnikov changes the subject by remarking on Razumikhin’s happiness and enlivened appearance, hinting that Razumikhin has a romantic interest in Dunya.
Razumikhin appears happy to find any excuse for Raskolnikov’s strange behavior that does not link him to the murders. Razumikhin therefore assumes that Raskolnikov’s agitation regarding the killings derives from his previous business dealings with the old crone. Whether Razumikhin naively believes in his friend’s innocence or simply cannot accept his friend’s guilt is up for debate.
Themes
Criminality, Morality, and Guilt Theme Icon
Madness and Intoxication Theme Icon
Coincidence and Free Will Theme Icon
Money and Poverty Theme Icon
Get the entire Crime and Punishment LitChart as a printable PDF.
Crime and punishment.pdf.medium