Don Quixote

Don Quixote

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Don Quixote de la Mancha Character Analysis

A poor hidalgo of nearly fifty named Alonso Quixano, he is a lonely, bookish man with nearly no family and no discernible past, who turns himself through the power of fantasy (or insanity) into a noble knight errant, sometimes also known as the Knight of the Sorry Face or the Knight of the Lions. Quixote is the product of his ideals straining against reality, a righter of wrongs and a comical fumbler. For the first half-century of his life Quixote stays home and reads fiction, from which he derives all his knowledge of the world. When he leaves home, he must face the irreparable differences between the world of chivalry books and the overwhelming, sensuous, contradictory reality of 17th century Spain. Not only that - he must face the disdain and mockery of everyone who wants to disabuse him of his ideals. The difficulties of the world, and the psychological and physical humiliations that Quixote must endure at the hand of his friends, finally extinguish his fantasies.

Don Quixote de la Mancha Quotes in Don Quixote

The Don Quixote quotes below are all either spoken by Don Quixote de la Mancha or refer to Don Quixote de la Mancha. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
).
Part 1, Chapter 1 Quotes

In short, our hidalgo was soon so absorbed in these books that his nights were spent reading from dusk till dawn, and his days from dawn till dusk, until the lack of sleep the excess of reading withered his brain, and he went mad. … The idea that this whole fabric of famous fabrications was real so established itself in his mind that no history in the world was truer for him.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha
Part 1, Chapter 2 Quotes

And since whatever our adventurer thought, saw, or imagined seemed to him to be as it was in the books he’d read, as soon as he saw the inn he took it for a castle with its four towers and their spires of shining silver.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha
Related Symbols: Inns
Part 1, Chapter 4 Quotes

There is no reason why someone with a plebeian name should not be a knight, for every man is the child of his own deeds.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker)
Part 1, Chapter 8 Quotes

But Don Quixote was so convinced that they were giants that he neither heard his squire Sancho’s shouts nor saw what stood in front of him.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha, Sancho Panza

He didn’t sleep in all the night, thinking about his lady Dulcinea, to conform with what he’d read in his books.

Part 1, Chapter 10 Quotes

… for in those very many [histories] that I have read, I have not found any mention of knights errant eating, except when it happened that some sumptuous banquet was held for them, but otherwise they used to live on next to nothing.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker)
Part 1, Chapter 11 Quotes

… for of knight-errantry may be said what is said of love, that it makes all things equal.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker)
Part 1, Chapter 13 Quotes

…for in [Dulcinea] all the chimerical attributes of loveliness that poets ascribe to their ladies become reality.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker), Dulcinea del Toboso
Part 1, Chapter 16 Quotes

… a knight adventurer, to cut a long story short, is someone who’s being beaten up one moment and being crowned emperor the next.

Related Characters: Sancho Panza (speaker), Don Quixote de la Mancha

And the poor hidalgo was so besotted that neither touch nor smell nor any of the good maiden’s other attributes could make him notice his mistake, even though they’d have made anyone but a muleteer vomit.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha
Part 1, Chapter 17 Quotes

Every minute of every hour of his imagination was filled with those battles, enchantments, adventures, loves, and challenges that books of chivalry recount, and everything he said, thought, or did was channeled into such affairs.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha
Part 1, Chapter 19 Quotes

The trouble, my dear Alonzo López BA, arose from your coming, as you did, by night, wearing those surplices, with your torches blazing, praying, and dressed in mourning, looking exactly like something evil from the other world; and so I could not fail to fulfill my obligation to attack you.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker)
Part 1, Chapter 20 Quotes

You can sleep, you were born to sleep – indeed you can do as you wish – but I shall behave as I consider befits my aspirations.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker), Sancho Panza
Part 1, Chapter 25 Quotes

What a string of absurdities you have come out with now, Sancho! What connection is there between what we are discussing and all those proverbs you have just threaded together?

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker), Sancho Panza

…whatever I have done, am doing, and shall do is totally reasonable and in conformity with the rules of chivalry.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker)

Let me add that when a painter wants to become famous for his art, he tries to copy originals by the finest artists he knows. And this same rule holds good for nearly all the trades and professions of importance that serve to adorn a society.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker)

Is it possible that in all the time you have been with me you have failed to realize that all things appertaining to us knights errant seem like chimeras, follies, and nonsenses, because they have all been turned on their head? Not because that is their real state, but because we are always attended by a crew of enchanters.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker), Sancho Panza

…the poets themselves invent most of [their ladies], to have something to write their poetry about, and to make people think that they are in love and that they have it in them to be lovers.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker)

…I imagine that everything I say is precisely as I say it is, and I depict her in my imagination as I wish her to be, both in beauty and in rank.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker), Dulcinea del Toboso
Part 1, Chapter 30 Quotes

It is not the responsibility of knights errant to discover whether the afflicted, the enchained, and the oppressed whom they encounter on the road are reduced to these circumstances and suffer their distress for the vices, or for their virtues: the knight’s sole responsibility is to succor them as people in need, having eyes only for their sufferings, not for their misdeeds.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker)
Part 1, Chapter 37 Quotes

This peace is the true goal of war.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker)

Don Quixote was developing his arguments in such an orderly and lucid way that for the time being none of those listening could believe he was a madman.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha
Part 1, Chapter 40 Quotes

It is possible that, since you have not been knighted, as I have, the enchantments in this place do not affect you, and that your understanding is unclouded, and that you can form judgments about the affairs of the castle as they really and truly are, rather than as they appeared to me.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker), Don Fernando
Part 1, Chapter 42 Quotes

Yet maybe the chivalry and the enchanting of these times of ours follow different paths from those of earlier days.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker)
Part 1, Chapter 49 Quotes

… enchantment can take many different forms, and it could be that these have changed in the course of time, so that what happens nowadays is that the enchanted do all the things that I do, even though formerly they did not. So one cannot either argue against the customs of the times, or draw any conclusions from them.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker)

I consider that it is you who are out of your senses and under some spell, for you have takes it upon yourself to utter such blasphemies against what has been so well received in the world and so widely accepted as the truth… Because trying to persuade someone that Amadis and all the other knights adventurers that pack the histories never existed is like trying to persuade him that the sun does not give out light, and that ice is not cold, and that the earth does not sustain us.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker), The canon
Part 1, Chapter 50 Quotes

Speaking for myself, I can say that ever since I became a knight errant I have been courageous, polite, generous, well-bred, magnanimous, courteous, bold, gentle, patient and long-suffering in the face of toil, imprisonment, and enchantment.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker)

You go wherever you like, and eat as much as you can; I am fully satisfied already, and only need refection for my spirit, which I shall obtain by listening to this good fellow’s story.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker), Sancho Panza, The canon
Part 1, Chapter 52 Quotes

O pride of your family, honour and glory of all La Mancha and all the world – now that you’ve gone from it, it’ll fill up with evil-doers who won’t be frightened of being punished for their wicked ways! ... O you who were humble to the haughty and haughty to the humble, tackler of dangers, taker of insults, in love without a cause, imitator of the good, scourge of the wicked, enemy of villains – in a word, knight errant, and that says it all!

Related Characters: Sancho Panza (speaker), Don Quixote de la Mancha
Part 2, Chapter 1 Quotes

I am merely striving to make the world understand the delusion under which it labours in not renewing within itself the happy days when the order of knight-errantry carried all before it. But these depraved times of ours do not deserve all those benefits enjoyed by the ages when knights errant accepted as their responsibility and took upon their shoulders the defense of kingdoms, the relief of damsels, the succour of orphans and wards, and chastisement of the arrogant and the rewarding of the humble.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker)

I have often, on different occasions and with different people, attempted to expose this almost universal misconception to the light of truth; … truth so palpable that I can almost say I have seen Amadis of Gaul with my own eyes.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker)
Part 2, Chapter 2 Quotes

We shall soon see where this great fabric of absurdities leaves this knight and this squire – anyone would think they’d been made in the same mold, and that the madness of the master wouldn’t be worth a farthing without the foolishness of the man.

Related Characters: The priest (speaker), Don Quixote de la Mancha, Sancho Panza
Part 2, Chapter 3 Quotes

It’s so very intelligible that it doesn’t pose any difficulties at all: children leaf through it, adolescents read it, grown men understand it and old men praise it, and, in short, it’s so well-thumbed and well-perused and well-known by all kinds of people that as soon as they see a skinny nag pass by they say: “Look, there goes Rocinante.” And the people who have most taken to it are the page-boys. There’s not a lord’s antechamber without its Quixote. … All in all, this history provides the most delightful and least harmful entertainment ever, because nowhere in it can one find the slightest suspicion of language that isn’t wholesome or thoughts that aren’t Catholic.

Related Characters: Sansón Carrasco (speaker), Don Quixote de la Mancha
Part 2, Chapter 4 Quotes

… there is a great confusion among lineages, and the only families who show themselves to be great and illustrious are those that display these qualities in the virtue, wealth and generosity of their paterfamilias. I say virtue, wealth and generosity because the great man who is sin-ridden can only be a great sinner, and the wealthy man who is not generous will be nothing but a miserly beggar. … The poor gentleman has no means of showing that he is a gentleman other than by his virtue: being affable, well-bred, courteous and considerate and solicitous; … and anybody who sees him adorned with these virtues of which I speak, even if he does not know him, cannot fail to consider that he is a man of good stock.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker)
Part 2, Chapter 8 Quotes

… the envy that some evil enchanter must feel for all my affairs transforms all things that can give me pleasure into shapes quite unlike their real ones; and so I fear that if perchance the author of the history of my exploits that is said to be in print is some hostile sage, he has no doubt altered everything, mingling a thousand lies with one truth.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker)

And so, O Sancho, our works must not stray beyond the limits imposed by the Christian religion that we profess. In slaying giants, we must slay pride; in our generosity and magnanimity, we must slay envy; in our tranquil demeanor and serene disposition, we must slay anger; in eating as little as we do and keeping vigil as much as we do, we must slay gluttony and somnolence; in our faithfulness to those whom we have made the mistresses of our thoughts, we must slay lewdness and lust; in wandering all over the world in search of opportunities to become famous knights as well as good Christians, we must slay sloth.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker), Sancho Panza
Part 2, Chapter 9 Quotes

Look here, you heretic: have I not told you over and over again that in all the days of my life I have never seen the peerless Dulcinea, and have never crossed the threshold of her palace, and am enamoured only by hearsay of her fame as a beautiful and intelligent lady?

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker), Dulcinea del Toboso
Part 2, Chapter 11 Quotes

On my faith as a knight errant… when I saw this cart I imagined that it heralded some great adventure, and now I do declare that appearances must be examined closely to discover the hidden truth.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker)
Part 2, Chapter 12 Quotes

With every day that passes by, dear Sancho, … you lose some foolishness and gain some sense.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker), Sancho Panza
Part 2, Chapter 16 Quotes

And do not imagine, sir, that by “vulgar crowd” I mean only the humble lower orders: everyone who is ignorant, even if he is a lord and a pillar of the community, can and should be considered one of the vulgar crowd.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker)
Part 2, Chapter 17 Quotes

…he sometimes thought [Quixote] sane and sometimes mad, because what he said was coherent, elegant and well expressed, and what he did was absurd, foolhardy and stupid.

Part 2, Chapter 18 Quotes

[Knight-errantry] is a subject … that contains within itself all or most of the other subjects in the world.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker)

All the doctors and fine clerks in the world couldn’t make a fair copy of that man by eliminating his blotches of insanity: he’s mad in streaks, complete with lucid intervals.

Related Characters: Don Lorenzo (speaker), Don Quixote de la Mancha
Part 2, Chapter 22 Quotes

Nothing that is directed at a virtuous end… can or should be called deception.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker)
Part 2, Chapter 24 Quotes

I cannot bring myself to believe that everything recorded in this chapter happened to the brave Don Quixote exactly as described… Yet I can’t believe that Don Quixote was lying, because he was the most honest hidalgo and the noblest knight of his time: he couldn’t have told a lie to save himself from being executed. … so I merely record it, without affirming either that it is false or that it is true.

Related Characters: Cide Hamete Benengeli (speaker), Don Quixote de la Mancha
Part 2, Chapter 26 Quotes

…the ploy of these enchanters who pursue me is to place before my eyes things as they are, and then change them into what they want them to be.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker)
Part 2, Chapter 29 Quotes

An ass you are, an ass you will remain and an ass you will still be when you end your days on this earth, and it is my belief that when you come to breathe your last you still will not have grasped the fact that you are an animal.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker), Sancho Panza

Although they look like water-mils, that is not what they are: I have already told you that enchantments transfigure al things and deprive them of their natural forms. I don’t mean to say that they really convert them from one thing into another, but that it seems as if they do.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker)

In this adventure two mighty enchanters must have clashed headlong, and one of them impedes whatever the other attempts: one provided me with the boat, the other knocked me out of it. May God send a remedy; for everything in this world is trickery, stage machinery, every part of it working against every other part. I have done all I can.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker)
Part 2, Chapter 31 Quotes

…Don Quixote was amazed by what was happening; and that was the first day when he was fully convinced that he was a real knight errant, not a fantasy one, seeing himself treated in the same way as he’d read that such knights used to be treated in centuries past.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha
Part 2, Chapter 32 Quotes

My intentions are always directed towards worthy ends, that is to say to do good to all and harm nobody; and whether the man who believes this, puts it into practice and devotes his life to it deserves to be called a fool is something for Your Graces, most excellent Duke and Duchess, to determine.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker), The Duke and the Duchess
Part 2, Chapter 41 Quotes

… and even if everything did turn out the opposite of how I believe it will, no amount of malice will be able to obscure the glory of having undertaken this exploit.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker)

Sancho, since you want people to believe what you saw in the sky, I want you to believe what I saw in the Cave of Montesinos.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker), Sancho Panza
Part 2, Chapter 44 Quotes

…the Dolorous Duenna’s face is indeed the butler’s, but this does not mean to say that the butler is the Dolorous Duenna; for if he were, this would imply a major contradiction, and now is not the time to make sure enquiries, which would take us into inextricable labyrinths.

Part 2, Chapter 58 Quotes

I consider it a good omen, my friends, to have seen what I have just seen, because these saintly knights professed, as I myself profess, the exercise of arms; but the difference between them and me is that they were saints, and fought in the manner of angels, and I am a sinner, and fight in the manner of men.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker)
Part 2, Chapter 59 Quotes

Yes, you eat up, friend Sancho … sustain life, which is of more interest to you than to me, and let me die at the hands of my thoughts and in the grasp of my misfortunes. I was born, Sancho, to live dying, and you were born to die eating.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker), Sancho Panza

I say it was an inn because that’s what Don Quixote called it, contrary to his habit of calling all inns castles.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha

And yet it seems to me that translating from one language into another, except from those queens of languages, Greek and Latin, is like viewing Flemish tapestries from the wrong side, when, although one can make out the figures, they are covered by threads that obscure them, and one cannot appreciate the smooth finish of the right side.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker)
Part 2, Chapter 60 Quotes

What I can tell you is that there’s no such thing as fortune, and whatever happens in this world, good and bad, does not occur by chance, but by special providence of heaven; and for this reason it is often said that every man is the architect of his own fortune. And I have been the architect of mine, but not with the necessary prudence, and so my presumption has led to disaster.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker)
Part 2, Chapter 67 Quotes

… the treasures of knights errant are like fairy gold, false and illusory.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker)
Part 2, Chapter 71 Quotes

They dismounted at an inn, which Don Quixote recognized as such and not as a castle with its deep moat, towers, portcullises and drawbridge; because now that he’d been defeated his judgment on all subjects was sounder, as will soon be shown.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha, Sancho Panza
Part 2, Chapter 74 Quotes

My mind has been restored to me, and it is now clear and free, without those gloomy shadows of ignorance cast over me by my wretched, obsessive reading of those detestable books of chivalry. Now I can recognize their absurdity and their deceitfulness, and my only regret is that this discovery has come so late that it leaves me no time to make amends by reading other books that might be a light for my soul.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker)

You must congratulate me, my good sirs, because I am no longer Don Quixote de la Mancha but Alonso Quixano, for whom my way of life earned me the nickname of “the Good”. I am now the enemy of Amadis of Gaul and the whole infinite horde or his descendants; now all those profane histories of knight-errantry are odious to me; now I acknowledge my folly and the peril in which I was placed by reading them; now, by God’s mercy, having at long last learned my lesson, I abominate them all.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker)

For me alone was Don Quixote born, and I for him; it was for him to act, for me to write; we two are one.

Related Characters: Cide Hamete Benengeli (speaker), Don Quixote de la Mancha
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Don Quixote de la Mancha Character Timeline in Don Quixote

The timeline below shows where the character Don Quixote de la Mancha appears in Don Quixote. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 1, Prologue
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
...quote them in full in the preface. He wants the reader’s gratitude not for Don Quixote but for the hilarious Sancho Panza. The prologue is followed by a series of poems,... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 1
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...new position as the horse of a famous knight errant, and he renames himself Don Quixote de la Mancha. Every knight errant is in love with a beautiful lady, so Don... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 2
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
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Soon afterwards, one morning in July, Don Quixote puts on his armor, mounts his horse, and begins his first sally as a knight... (full context)
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...them very formally, and they burst out laughing. The innkeeper steps outside and invites Don Quixote to spend the night. He helps Quixote dismount and the girls take off all his... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 3
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When he finishes eating, Don Quixote falls on his knees and begs the innkeeper to knight him – but only after... (full context)
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Don Quixote goes out to a side yard, places his armor on top of a well, and... (full context)
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The frustrated innkeeper decides to knight Quixote right away. He slaps Quixote on the neck and thumps his shoulder with Quixote’s sword.... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 4
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As he rides away from the inn, Don Quixote decides to return home to gather money and supplies and to find himself a squire.... (full context)
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As soon as Don Quixote rides away, the farmer ties the boy to the tree and beats him more brutally... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 5
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Since he is too hurt to move, Don Quixote decides to pass the time by reciting passages from a book about a certain Marquis... (full context)
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When it gets dark, the farmer takes Quixote back to his own house, where Quixote’s friends the priest and the barber are discussing... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 6
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The next day, while Don Quixote is sleeping, the priest, the barber, the niece, and the housekeeper decide to look through... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 7
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Soon, Don Quixote begins to shout, leaps out of bed and charges here and there with his sword,... (full context)
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Don Quixote spends the next twelve days talking to his friends the priest and the barber and... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 8
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Soon after they leave the village, Don Quixote and Sancho come upon thirty or forty windmills. Where there are windmills, Don Quixote sees... (full context)
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They resume their travels in the direction of the Pass of Lapicé. Don Quixote plans to replace his broken lance with a thick branch, as did some fictional knight,... (full context)
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They spend the night in a forest, where Don Quixote makes his new lance from a branch. He stays awake all night thinking about Dulcinea,... (full context)
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...mules and a coach surrounded by footmen carrying a lady on her way to Seville. Quixote decides that the two friars are enchanters who have abducted a princess. He demands that... (full context)
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Meanwhile, Don Quixote greets the lady in the carriage and asks her to present herself to Dulcinea del... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 9
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...such a wonderful story ended so prematurely, and says that a great knight like Don Quixote deserves to have a sage of his own to record all of his deeds and... (full context)
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The first notebook begins with an illustration of the moment before the fight between Don Quixote and the coachman. Rocinante looks very skinny and weak, and Sancho is short and round.... (full context)
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...by saying that the coachman delivered the first blow, which took off part of Don Quixote’s helmet and half his ear on his left side. Then the angry knight struck the... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 10
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Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...has won the fight, he comes over to ask him for the promised island. Don Quixote explains that this isn’t an island-acquiring kind of adventure, but that islands are surely in... (full context)
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When Quixote notices the harm done to his helmet, he swears (like a knight of old) not... (full context)
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Sancho offers Quixote some food, but he replies that knights in books eat rarely, sometimes not for a... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 11
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...boiling goat meat in a pot over a flame, and they invite Sancho and Don Quixote to share their meal. Quixote magnanimously invites Sancho to eat with him as equals, because... (full context)
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...reply to her lover’s pleas. After the song, a goatherd applies rosemary and salt to Quixote’s ear wound. (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 12
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One of the goatherds tells Quixote that the dead man was a wealthy gentleman, a former student at Salamanca University, and... (full context)
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...which makes all the men rail against her cruelty and coldness. After the conversation ends, Quixote and Sancho sleep in a shepherd’s hut – Quixote thinking all night of Dulcinea, Sancho... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 13
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...and servants, also on their way to the funeral. One of the travellers ask Don Quixote about his strange outfit, and when he responds that he’s a knight errant devoted to... (full context)
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The horseman asks Don Quixote to describe his beloved, and the knight describes Dulcinea’s perfect beauty – a mixture of... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 14
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...and disappears back into the forest, some men rise up and follow her; but Don Quixote rises with his sword to prevent anyone from intruding on this honorable woman. Finally they... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 15
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Sancho and Don Quixote spend hours looking for Marcela to offer their protection, but she seems to have disappeared.... (full context)
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Sancho and Quixote are left lying helplessly on the ground. Quixote decides that the beating is a punishment... (full context)
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Don Quixote asks Sancho to put him on the donkey and try to find them a place... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 16
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...girls dress the guests’ wounds as best they can. Sancho explains to them that Don Quixote is a knight errant, “someone who’s being beaten up one moment and being crowned emperor... (full context)
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...such careful detail. That night, the two adventurers are kept up by their aches. Don Quixote begins to fantasize about the castle, and thinks that the innkeeper’s daughter is a lovely... (full context)
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The girl tries to break away, but Don Quixote hangs on to her. The muleteer angrily begins to pummel the knight and walk all... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 17
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The battered Don Quixote wakes up in the dark and tells Sancho in strict confidence that the beautiful princess... (full context)
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Don Quixote decides to make some of his magic balsam, and asks Sancho to get him oil,... (full context)
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When the innkeeper asks for his payment, Quixote explains that knights do not pay such fees and quickly rides away. The innkeeper then... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 18
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As they ride away, Don Quixote says that the enchanters must have stopped him from helping Sancho, and Sancho says that... (full context)
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“Seeing in his imagination what he didn’t see and what didn’t exist,” Don Quixote describes in great detail the soldiers not approaching them, as Sancho listens with excitement. Suddenly,... (full context)
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Sancho decides to leave Don Quixote and go home. The knight perceives his squire’s unhappiness and assures him that better times... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 19
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...and followed by six men on mules. Imagining this is an adventure from his books, Quixote approaches them and tells them his duty is “either to punish you for the wrong... (full context)
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One of the fallen figures tells Quixote that he is a student and priest who has come with eleven other priests to... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 20
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Quixote and Sancho hear the sound of rushing water, along with a frightening pounding noise. Don... (full context)
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...had to transport each goat first, one by one by one… Here Sancho insists that Quixote keep track of each goat or else the story will end. Quixote is bemused by... (full context)
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...off, so he tries to relieve himself very quietly to avoid disturbing his master. Don Quixote points out the smell, they joke about it, and spend the rest of the night... (full context)
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...is coming from some fulling-hammers (machines used in cloth-making). They laugh at their foolishness, though Quixote is also embarrassed and angry. Sancho mocks Quixote’s earlier overblown pronouncements on courage and destiny... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 21
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...while, they see a man riding toward them with something gold on his head. Don Quixote is certain the man is a knight riding a noble steed and that the gold... (full context)
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...whether it wouldn’t be better for them to serve an emperor in a war. Don Quixote explains that a knight must first wander the world and gain fame; then he will... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 22
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...conversation, the friends see twelve men all shackled together, followed by four armed guards. Don Quixote decides he must help the men, since they are being forced to act against their... (full context)
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Quixote asks the prisoners to present themselves to Dulcinea, but the murderer Ginés de Pasamonte explains... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 23
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Sancho becomes afraid that the Holy Brotherhood will come after them. As they ride along, Quixote dreams of knights while Sancho dreams of food. They come across a rotting bag containing... (full context)
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...after, they see a ragged, half-naked man run wildly over nearby rocks and disappear. Don Quixote decides to go looking for him, though Sancho thinks it would be best to leave... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 24
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Cardenio mentions that he had lent Luscinda Amadis of Gaul. This sends Quixote on a rant about books of chivalry, and the two men get into a strange... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 25
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Don Quixote retracts his request that Sancho keep quiet. Sancho asks why he had made such a... (full context)
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As in many other arts and professions, explains Quixote, greatness in knight-errantry is achieved by imitation. For this reason, he will imitate Amadis of... (full context)
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...de Pasamonte happens to pass by the spot in the wild sierras where Sancho and Quixote have chosen to spend the night, and he quietly steals Sancho’s donkey. Sancho is so... (full context)
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Don Quixote rips some paper from Cardenio’s notebook to write a letter to Dulcinea and a warrant... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 26
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...into the priest and the barber from his village; they have set out to bring Quixote home in order to cure him of his madness. Sancho tells them about their recent... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 27
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...when the time comes. The next day they start to find their way back to Quixote’s hiding place, with Sancho’s help. They all decide that Sancho would go on ahead to... (full context)
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...in full – the same story he had left unfinished in his conversation with Don Quixote. (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 29
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...strength in their home village, and the barber tells them the strange tale of Don Quixote and Sancho Panza and describes their plan for restoring Quixote to sanity. (full context)
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In the meantime, Sancho returns and tells them he found Quixote hungry, weak, and unwilling to return to the village before he proves his courage. Sancho... (full context)
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Dorotea, the priest, and the barber go to find Don Quixote. Dorotea falls on her knees and begs him to restore her to her rightful place... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 30
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Sancho points out to the company that it was Don Quixote who had freed the prisoners, and that he had warned his master against it. Quixote... (full context)
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...delighted to learn that his master will soon be emperor of a kingdom, but Don Quixote declines the princess’s offer of marriage. When Sancho angrily exclaims that the princess is much... (full context)
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Don Quixote asks Sancho about his visit to Dulcinea. But suddenly they see Ginés de Pasamonte riding... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 31
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Quixote says Sancho must have found Dulcinea sorting gold or pearls, but Sancho pretends that she... (full context)
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...he embarrasses the discreet Dulcinea by sending all these people to her to speak of Quixote’s love, and Quixote explains that a knight’s love is chaste; a knight expects nothing in... (full context)
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...company sits down to eat. Suddenly a boy runs down from the road and hugs Quixote’s legs in tears – it is the shepherd boy that had been tied to a... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 32
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...The innkeeper and his wife welcome them cordially and prepare them a nice meal while Quixote takes a nap. When the innkeeper hears the priest mention the harmful effect of chivalry... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 35
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The story is almost over when Sancho runs in yelling that Don Quixote has been battling a heavily bleeding giant in his room; the innkeeper angrily deduces that... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 37
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...and can’t give him any estates, and that the giant is really Don Fernando. Don Quixote finally wakes up. Sancho informs him that the giant’s blood has turned into wine, and... (full context)
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...their adventures, and Don Fernando and Dorotea agree to help complete the project of returning Quixote to his village. Don Quixote comes down and asks Dorotea whether she has been transformed... (full context)
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Over dinner, Quixote exclaims with satisfaction that knight-errantry must be a marvelous thing if it can bring together... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 38
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Don Quixote continues the comparison. He says that arms could not exist without letters, because wars are... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 42
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...and the wedding. Soon afterwards, everyone turns in for the night – everyone but Don Quixote, who decides to keep guard outside the inn to ensure the women’s safety. Just before... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 43
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...the innkeeper’s daughter and the servant girl Maritornes decide to have some fun at Don Quixote’s expense. They watch him sighing for Dulcinea through a hole in the hayloft, which opens... (full context)
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Don Quixote sits very still, because if Rocinante moves out from under him he’ll be left hanging... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 44
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The innkeeper hears Quixote’s noise and runs outside. Maritornes hears it as well, so she runs to the loft... (full context)
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...are giving the innkeeper a heavy beating, and the innkeeper’s daughter runs over to Don Quixote to beg him for help. He runs over, but not before receiving Dorotea’s permission to... (full context)
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...over. Just then, another guest arrives at the inn – barber # 2, from whom Quixote stole Mambrino’s helmet and Sancho stole a pack-saddle. Barber 2 recognizes Sancho and cries thief,... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 45
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The barber from Quixote’s village decides to play along with Quixote’s delusion for fun’s sake, and tells barber 2... (full context)
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...as some recently arrived members of Holy Brotherhood, are all infuriated by this nonsense. Don Quixote charges at one of the peace-officers and all kinds of little fights break out among... (full context)
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Suddenly Quixote decides that they are all in a book that describes someone called King Agramante, or... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 46
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The priest explains to the officer that there is no point in arresting Don Quixote, since he would be released immediately because of his madness. The officers are so astonished... (full context)
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...can’t be a real princess, since she has been kissing Don Fernando on the sly. Quixote yells at Sancho to be quiet, but Dorotea gently interjects to say that an enchanter... (full context)
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...friends thinks of a plan that would allow the barber and the priest to bring Quixote back to the village without having to drag Dorotea with them. They build a wooden... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 47
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Don Quixote is perplexed to discover his predicament, since it does not correspond to any knight histories... (full context)
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...up with them on the road and one of them asks the company about Don Quixote’s cage. Don Quixote asks him whether he knows anything about knight-errantry, because if not he... (full context)
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...canon ride ahead so that they can talk in peace. The priest tells the canon Quixote’s story. The canon says that chivalry tales are “absurd stories, concerned only to amuse and... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 48
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...the priest and company for a meal in a pretty valley. Sancho comes over to Quixote’s cage and whispers to him that his captors are merely the priest and the barber,... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 49
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Sancho tells Quixote triumphantly that enchanted people don’t have that need, and therefore he must not be enchanted.... (full context)
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...be that such an intelligent man believes all the lies in chivalry books. He encourages Quixote to read all the wonderful truthful books instead, like history books and the Bible. Quixote... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 50
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Quixote goes on to describe the pleasures and splendors of chivalry books: the magical places, the... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 52
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Don Quixote tells the goatherd that he would rescue Leandra from the convent right away, were he... (full context)
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...praises: he was brave, generous, humble, “imitator of the good, scourge of the wicked.” Don Quixote wakes up and agrees to come back to the village while his shoulder heals. They... (full context)
Part 2, Prologue
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The author repeats that he does not resent the author of the false Quixote but emphasizes that this second part was written by the same author as the first,... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 1
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Cide Hamete Benengeli writes that after Quixote came back to his home village, the priest and the barber did not come to... (full context)
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Don Quixote reproaches the barber for making such callous comparisons. He explains that he is not a... (full context)
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The barber apologizes, and the priest tells Quixote that he can’t help but feel that all the histories of knights are dreams and... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 2
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...trying to stop Sancho Panza from coming into the house, worried that he will remind Quixote of his old mischief. He comes in at Quixote’s request, and the priest and barber... (full context)
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Sancho and Quixote are also discussing their complementarity: Quixote explains to Sancho that master and servant are part... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 3
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Sancho leaves to get the student who had told him about the book. Quixote is surprised that his adventures have been recorded so promptly, but assumes that a book... (full context)
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Quixote asks Carrasco whether the book described every adventure in detail, hoping that it has omitted... (full context)
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...a Rocinante. Everyone finds it delightful and harmless because every word is “wholesome” and “Catholic.” Quixote says almost in one breath that a book about his deeds must be glorious and... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 4
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...that some people have been asking about a second history, clamoring for more “quixotry” where Quixote fights and Sancho talks. Sancho is sure that soon enough he and his master will... (full context)
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Sancho is concerned that his master attacks too freely and irresponsibly, and warns Quixote and Carrasco that he will take care of his master but he won’t fight for... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 5
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...in a very happy mood and tells his wife Teresa that he’s excited to join Quixote on his third sally. He speaks so elaborately that at first she can’t quite understand... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 6
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The niece and the housekeeper see that Don Quixote is planning another sally and try to convince him not to leave. The niece tries... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 7
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The despairing housekeeper runs to find Carrasco and asks him to stop Quixote from running away again. Carrasco promises to do all he can. Meanwhile, Sancho tells Quixote... (full context)
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As Sancho processes his disappointment, Carrasco comes in and ceremoniously encourages Quixote to set off on his third sally without delay. He even offers to be Quixote’s... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 8
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Quixote tells Sancho that he wants to receive Dulcinea’s blessing before beginning any new quests, and... (full context)
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Quixote talks about the harmful effects of fame, and is moved to reflect that knight-errantry accords... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 9
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At midnight, the two friends enter the town. Quixote asks Sancho to lead them to Dulcinea’s palace; Sancho, who has never been to see... (full context)
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Quixote asks a stranger on the road to point them to Dulcinea’s castle, and the stranger... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 10
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...looks at one thing and sees something else entirely, and decides to try and convince Quixote that some peasant girl is Dulcinea, and that an enchanter has transformed her into a... (full context)
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...out of the wood, but where Sancho pretends to see beautiful ladies on fine horses Quixote only sees peasant girls on donkeys. Sancho rides toward the girls, kneels by the one... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 11
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...a cart full of people dressed as demons, angels, kings, knights, and other characters. Don Quixote stops them and angrily asks them who they are, and the coachman patiently explains that... (full context)
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...them, and his noisy bells scare Rocinante so much that it races away and flings Quixote to the ground. Quixote wants to punish the actors for their impudence, but Sancho reminds... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 12
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Don Quixote thinks wistfully that he might have won some good spoils had he attacked the actors,... (full context)
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...of the Forest hears voices and walks over to the two friends. He talks to Quixote about love and knighthood while their squires have a conversation of their own. (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 14
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The Knight of the Forest tells Quixote that he is in love with a woman named Casildea de Vandalia, who has asked... (full context)
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...is renamed Knight of the Spangles. They back up and charge at one another; Don Quixote’s horse is faster, so Quixote throws the Knight of the Spangles to the ground. He... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 15
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Carrasco had planned with the priest and the barber to let Quixote leave on his sally and to force him back home through the trick described above:... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 16
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Quixote is overjoyed by his recent victory. He and Sancho discuss whether the knight and squire... (full context)
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...hidalgo. His son is a student and poet, which the man considers a frivolous pursuit. Quixote responds that poetry is an honorable, delicate pursuit, not for the vulgar-minded (which, he points... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 17
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Don Diego tries to warn Quixote that the cart is probably carrying royal property and ought not be tampered with, but... (full context)
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When the cart drives by them, Quixote asks them about the purpose of their journey. The driver explains that he is delivering... (full context)
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As the keeper prepares to open the crate, the author exclaims in praise of Quixote’s bravery. The first crate contains an enormous lion, which yawns, looks at Don Quixote, and... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 18
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...to judge for himself whether the knight is mad or sane. Don Lorenzo goes into Quixote’s room, talks to him about poetry, and asks him what he studied at university. Quixote... (full context)
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Over lunch, Quixote asks Don Lorenzo to recite some his poetry glosses (verse summaries of other poems). The... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 19
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On the road, Sancho and Quixote encounter a group of two students and two farmers. One of the students invites Quixote... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 20
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In the morning Quixote walks over to wake up Sancho, saying to himself that the simple, innocent person sleeps... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 21
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Quixote and Sancho admire the bride and groom. As they approach, a man dressed in black... (full context)
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...a metal tube filled with blood. Camacho and his friends run to attack Basilio but Quixote wards them off with a conciliatory speech and his sword. Camacho decides to throw the... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 22
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The two friends stay with the couple for three days. Quixote tells Basilio that his trick was not dishonorable, because it was meant to achieve a... (full context)
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Quixote finds a guide to show them the way to the famous Cave of Montesinos, and... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 23
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After lunch, Quixote describes his adventure. About thirty yards from the bottom of the cave, he decided to... (full context)
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He took Quixote into a room in the palace, where the dead knight Durandante lay sighing and asking... (full context)
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The guide wonders how Quixote could have seen so much in the span of thirty minutes, but Quixote explains that... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 24
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Cide Hamete Benengeli prefaces the chapter by saying he can’t believe that Quixote’s story is true, nor can he believe that Quixote lied, though there’s a rumor that... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 25
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When they get to the inn, Quixote finds the arms carrier and asks him to tell his story. One day, a councillor... (full context)
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...puppeteer named Master Pedro. The man comes back with his puppets and an old ape. Quixote asks the ape to describe his future, but Master Pedro explains that the ape only... (full context)
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Quixote is impressed by the ape’s skill but tells Sancho that Master Pedro must have made... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 26
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...Melisendra from captivity. When he starts to describe the enemy army chasing after the couple, Quixote springs up to defend them and smashes all the puppets with his sword, to Master... (full context)
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When Quixote realizes what he’s done, he says sadly that the enchanters once again distorted his perception... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 27
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Don Quixote and Sancho spend three days on the road. On the third day they run into... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 28
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Sancho is angry that Quixote did not defend him from the villagers, but Quixote explains that “courage which is not... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 29
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Two days later the two friends reach the river Ebro. On its shore Quixote notices a small boat, which he takes to mean that someone is calling for his... (full context)
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They see some water-mills in the middle of the river. Quixote explains to Sancho that though they look like water mills, they are really a city... (full context)
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...boat belonged see the boat smashed to bits in the mills, they angrily demand recompense. Quixote tells them he will pay for the boat once they release their prisoner. The fishermen... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 30
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The next day, Sancho and Quixote run into some falconers and a beautiful lady on horseback. Sancho introduces himself and his... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 31
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The Duke had given his servants orders in advance instructing them to treat Don Quixote as a knight errant, so when the company gets to the castle two servants in... (full context)
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Don Quixote is escorted into a beautiful private suite. He finds Sancho and scolds him for his... (full context)
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The Duchess inquires about the Lady Dulcinea, and Quixote mournfully admits that enchanters have turned her into an ugly peasant girl. Here the priest... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 32
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Quixote replies with barely restrained rage that churchmen that have seen nothing of the world have... (full context)
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The Duke compliments Quixote on his speech, and the knight explains that he doesn’t need to seek revenge, because... (full context)
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The Duchess asks Quixote to describe Dulcinea’s beauty, but Quixote explains that he can only remember her in her... (full context)
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The Duchess assures Quixote that she believes that Dulcinea is real, but she wonders why Sancho found her sieving... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 34
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...in a long-winded speech sprinkled with proverbs that hunting seems like a cruel amusement. Don Quixote scolds him for his foolish proverbs, but the Duchess jumps to his defense, saying that... (full context)
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...the devil; he has come with troops of enchanters, Dulcinea, and Montesinos to tell Don Quixote how Dulcinea is to be disenchanted. He tells Don Quixote to wait there for instructions.... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 35
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...thousand and three hundred times. Sancho is outraged and refuses to lash himself at all. Quixote and the Dulcinea stand-in scold him for his cowardice and laziness, and the Duke tells... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 36
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...messenger from the Countess Trifaldi, also known as the Dolorous Duenna. She is seeking Don Quixote’s assistance. The Duke assures the messenger that the knight is at her service. He comments... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 37
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Sancho does not want Quixote to take on this quest, because he is suspicious of duennas in general. Doña Rodríguez... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 39
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...metal column between them. The column states that the lovers will be disenchanted when Don Quixote fights the giant. The giant then punished the duennas by causing them to grow bristly... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 40
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Quixote vows to help the duennas and the petrified lovers. The Duenna explains that Malambruno promised... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 41
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...of the island contingent on Sancho’s participation in this adventure. Just before mounting the horse, Quixote says to Sancho that even if the adventure is a trick, it is still glorious... (full context)
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The two friends are blindfolded and mount the wooden horse. As soon as Quixote turns the peg, he hears everyone shouting goodbyes and exclaiming how high and how quickly... (full context)
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...satisfied, and that the duennas and the newlyweds will be restored to their original states. Quixote wakes up the Duke and Duchess and tells them the good news. Sancho tells the... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 42
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...governing he’ll never want to stop, because it’s so much fun to order people around. Quixote heartily congratulates his squire, emphasizing, though, that the island is a gift from god and... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 43
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In the last chapter Quixote advised Sancho about his soul, and here he advises him about his body. He tells... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 44
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...people in the earlier adventures, including the Dolorous Duenna. When Sancho notes the amazing resemblance, Quixote says the resemblance must be meaningless, because it “would imply a major contradiction,” and there... (full context)
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As soon as Sancho leaves for his island, Quixote misses him so much that he becomes visibly melancholy. He eats dinner, goes to his... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 46
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In the morning, Quixote joins the Duke and Duchess at breakfast. When he passes Altisidora on the way, she... (full context)
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Later that night, Quixote finds a guitar in his room and performs a ballad hinting at Altisidora’s impetuous flirtation... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 48
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Don Quixote stays in his room for five days while the cat wounds heal. Late one night,... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 50
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...mysterious assailants were Altisidora and the Duchess, who eavesdropped on the duenna’s conversation with Don Quixote and wanted to take revenge on her for telling unflattering tales. While Quixote recovers, the... (full context)
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...Carrasco thinks the whole story must be some sort of hoax, or another one of Quixote’s fantasies, but the page replies that he is a real page, and Sancho is a... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 51
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Sancho eats a hearty lunch and then reads a letter from Don Quixote that contains more advice. Quixote tells Sancho to be clean, polite, ensure that his island... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 52
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One day, when Don Quixote is dining with the Duke and Duchess, the duenna Rodríguez and her daughter burst in.... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 55
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...pit, and he and his donkey crawl through it into a large cavern. Meanwhile, Don Quixote rides out that same morning to practice for his duel. He rides by the pit... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 56
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...to replace the duenna’s daughter’s seducer in the battle, not to endanger his life or Quixote’s. The battle takes place on a large platform, surrounded by thousands of spectators, including the... (full context)
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...her daughter yell out that the actual seducer has been replaced by the Duke’s lackey. Quixote calmly explains that the illusion must be the work of enchanters, who changed the man’s... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 57
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Quixote grows tired of his idle life in the castle and decides to take to the... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 58
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Quixote is delighted to be on the road once again, free from love affairs, luxuries, and... (full context)
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...away, and Sancho tells his master that this was the gentlest adventure they’ve ever had. Quixote agrees and warns Sancho not to take omens too seriously, because sometimes they are only... (full context)
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Suddenly, Quixote gets caught in a slim green net hanging from a tree. Two beautiful girls costumed... (full context)
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Quixote thanks the girls for their hospitality and promises to profess their unsurpassed beauty (surpassed by... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 59
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Sancho and Quixote wash off the road dust in a stream. Sancho wants to have lunch, but Quixote... (full context)
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...they overhear some people in the next room talking about the second part of Don Quixote de la Mancha. The two men agree that the second part is much worse than... (full context)
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...book depicts Sancho as an unfunny glutton. Sancho tells the gentlemen that the Sancho and Quixote in the false second book aren’t the same as the Sancho and Quixote in the... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 60
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...for six days. On the night of the sixth day Sancho quickly falls asleep and Quixote stays up thinking about Dulcinea. He rouses Sancho and tries to lash him, or to... (full context)
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Captain Roque tells Quixote that he is a good-natured person, but that he has been dragged into a life... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 61
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Sancho and Quixote travel with Captain Roque and his band for three adventure-filled days and nights. They part... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 62
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...called Don Antonio Moreno, decides to play some tricks on his guests. He takes Don Quixote into a room that is empty except for a bust on a slab and tells... (full context)
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The next day, Don Antonio leads Quixote, his wife, and some friends into the room with the bust. First, he asks the... (full context)
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...until the inquisitors ordered him to take it apart. One day during his visit, Don Quixote wanders by a printing house and decides to go inside. A man shows him a... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 63
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Later that same day, Don Antonio takes Quixote and Sancho to see the galleys. The men lift anchor and the ship quickly sails... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 64
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Quixote offers to go rescue Don Gaspar himself, but Sancho and the others convince him it... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 65
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...The Knight tells him that he is the student Sansón Carrasco, and he has tricked Quixote into returning to the village so that he might regain his sanity. Don Antonio scolds... (full context)
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...Spain was right to cleanse the country so completely. In a few days Sancho and Quixote leave Barcelona and begin travelling back to their village. (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 66
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Sancho tries to cheer up Quixote by blaming their misfortune on fate, but Quixote tells him that there is no fate,... (full context)
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...he and his opponent weigh the same amount. Everyone is grateful for Sancho’s wisdom, but Quixote rushes on. (full context)
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...a pike and some travelling bags. It is the Duke’s lackey Tosilos, and he urges Quixote to come and stay at the Duke’s castle. He tells Quixote that he (Tosilos) was... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 67
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Quixote asks Sancho whether the lackey mentioned anything about Altisidora. He is grateful for her love,... (full context)
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...friends pass the meadow where they met the party of pretend shepherds and shepherdesses, and Quixote decides that he and Sancho will also become shepherds for their year at home. They’ll... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 68
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Quixote rouses Sancho and urges him to give himself some lashes. Sancho grumbles and waves his... (full context)
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...taking six hundred pigs to a fair. The animals trample over the two friends, and Quixote explains sadly that they must be divine punishment for an unworthy knight. Sancho falls back... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 69
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The men carry Don Quixote and Sancho into a dark, torch-lit courtyard. In the middle of the courtyard, they see... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 70
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Cide Hamete explains that the student Carrasco found out Quixote’s location from the Duke’s page, spoke to the Duke about his adventures with Quixote, rode... (full context)
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Meanwhile, Altisidora steals into the friends’ room, where Sancho is sleeping soundly and Quixote is lying awake. She tells Quixote that his neglect killed her for a little while.... (full context)
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Don Quixote tells Altisidora once again that he loves only Dulcinea, and she tells him angrily that... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 71
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Quixote is depressed to have to return to his village, but thrilled that Sancho is capable... (full context)
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Finally Quixote stops him and they ride on to a nearby inn, which to Quixote definitely looks... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 72
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The following day, Quixote and Sancho overhear a servant address a guest at the inn with the name Don... (full context)
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The village mayor stops by the inn, and Quixote convinces him to notarize Don Tarfe’s statement that he, Don Quixote, is not the man... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 73
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...overhear one little boy say to another: “That’s something that’s never ever going to happen.” Quixote thinks this incident is a bad omen, if one applies the phrase to his hopes... (full context)
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...the boys follow them into the village, mocking them all the way. They walk to Quixote’s house, where they meet the niece, the housekeeper, Teresa, and Sanchica. Quixote tells the priest... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 74
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Soon after Quixote comes home, he contracts a fever. His friends try to cheer him up, but to... (full context)
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The three friends come in. Quixote tells them that he is not Don Quixote de la Mancha anymore – he is... (full context)
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The priest takes his confession and announces his imminent death, and everyone starts crying. Quixote leaves part of his money to Sancho and apologizes to him for involving him in... (full context)
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This concludes the history of Don Quixote de la Mancha. Cide Hamete says that no one else may describe Don Quixote, because... (full context)