Don Quixote

Don Quixote

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Don Quixote Part 2, Chapter 7 Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
The despairing housekeeper runs to find Carrasco and asks him to stop Quixote from running away again. Carrasco promises to do all he can. Meanwhile, Sancho tells Quixote that he’s ready to go looking for new adventures. Quixote corrects his vocabulary mistakes and both mocks and compliments him for his endless strings of irrelevant proverbs. Sancho asks Quixote for a fixed monthly wage, rather than a share in some future conquest, but Quixote explains chivalry books never mention squire’s wages, and he does not want to go against tradition.
Quixote theoretically believes that people can choose to be whatever they wish. But we can see that Sancho’s clumsy, transparent efforts to become wise and eloquent irritate Quixote a little bit. Quixote is admirable and idealistic, but sometimes he has a rotten temper. He can’t always live up to his own ideals, just as Sancho can’t always speak up to his own actions.
Themes
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
As Sancho processes his disappointment, Carrasco comes in and ceremoniously encourages Quixote to set off on his third sally without delay. He even offers to be Quixote’s squire. Sancho breaks down in tears and swears to be loyal to his master, wages or no wages. They gather provisions, and three days later the two friends leave for El Toboso.
Sancho’s stereotype is a down-to-earth, uneducated peasant, more interested in food and money than in ideals or abstractions. But here Sancho surpasses his stereotype; he chooses friendship and squiredom over money and comfort.
Themes
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon