Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

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is the other identity of Dr Jekyll, but is first known to us as a separate character. He appears in the gruesome anecdotes of Enfield and the maid, as a horrifically violent gentleman, with little remorse and, most noticeably, a strangely powerful appearance of evil and deformity. As the evil self of Dr. Jekyll, Hyde delights in causing harm to others, with no remorse or conscience. Though Jekyll claims that to be double in this way is a natural part of the human condition, Hyde himself, as only half of that double identity, is an unnatural being.

Mr. Hyde Quotes in Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

The Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde quotes below are all either spoken by Mr. Hyde or refer to Mr. Hyde. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Science, Reason and the Supernatural Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Signet Classics edition of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde published in 2012.
Chapter 1 Quotes

"He is not easy to describe. There is something wrong with his appearance; something displeasing, something down-right detestable. I never saw a man I so disliked, and yet I scarce know why. He must be deformed somewhere; he gives a strong feeling of deformity, although I couldn't specify the point.”

Related Characters: Mr. Enfield (speaker), Mr. Hyde
Related Symbols: The Appearance of Evil
Page Number: 53
Explanation and Analysis:

Mr. Enfield describes the appearance of Mr. Hyde to his friend Mr. Utterson. Enfield notes that Hyde seems hideously ugly, though Enfield can't exactly explain why. Because Mr. Hyde is the embodiment of evil, Mr. Enfield's reaction to Hyde's appearance reflects his attitude toward the abstract concept of evil. Because Enfield is a good, moral man, he naturally rejects Hyde, and just as Enfield finds Hyde ugly without being to specify what, exactly, is ugly about him, Enfield instinctively rejects evil without fully understanding it.

Enfield's observation that Hyde seems "deformed somehow" suggests that evil is a twisted, misshapen version of good. Hyde's deformed appearance could also reflect the fact that at this early stage in the novel, Jekyll's good side is stronger than his bad side--Jekyll (good) is strong, and Hyde (evil) is weak.

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Chapter 4 Quotes

And then all of a sudden he broke out in a great flame of anger, stamping with his foot, brandishing the cane, and carrying on (as the maid described it) like a madman.

Related Characters: Mr. Hyde
Page Number: 69
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Hyde commits a horrible crime; he beats up a defenseless old man, Sir Danvers Carew. Stevenson uses subtly-chosen language to convey the nature of Hyde's evil: he describes Hyde "breaking out" like a flame, suggesting that Hyde is as fierce, angry, and uncontrollable as fire.

Hyde, one could say, is pure "id" (a concept from Freudian psychoanalysis)--he feels an unquenchable need to exercise his own aggression, or whatever other desire he might be feeling, and has no "ego" to check his behavior. Dr. Jekyll feels similar aggressive instincts, but because he's a good man, he knows how to control and repress such instincts. Hyde--the embodiment of all Jekyll's sins and secret desires, has no such restraints on his behavior, and thus, he beats the old man.

Chapter 5 Quotes

"I cannot say that I care what becomes of Hyde; I am quite done with him. I was thinking of my own character, which this hateful business has rather exposed."

Related Characters: Dr. Jekyll (speaker), Mr. Hyde
Page Number: 76
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Dr. Jekyll insists that he is "done" with Mr. Hyde. Although Utterson doesn't know it at the time, Jekyll is saying that he'll never drink his potion again--from now on, he'll keep the "Mr. Hyde side" of his personality concealed. Jekyll makes a subtle pun on the word "exposed." Unbeknownst to Utterson, Jekyll's experience in Hyde's shoes has, quite literally, exposed Jekyll's moral character: it has literalized the secret wickedness that's been hiding in Jekyll's soul for years.

Jekyll's comments raise an interesting question: is Jekyll morally responsible for Hyde's actions? It's important to remember that Dr. Jekyll's personality encompasses Mr. Hyde: even now, as Dr. Jekyll speaks to Utterson, Hyde is within him. So even though Jekyll claims that he's done with Hyde, we'll come to see that Jekyll can never be truly "done." Jekyll will always have a secret dark side--the only question is whether or not Jekyll will be able to keep this side of his soul under control, or whether it will take over his more "civilized" self.

Chapter 6 Quotes

The death of Sir Danvers was, to his way of thinking, more than paid for by the disappearance of Mr. Hyde. Now that that evil influence had been withdrawn, a new life began for Dr. Jekyll. He came out of his seclusion, renewed relations with his friends, became once more their familiar guest and entertainer…

Related Characters: Dr. Jekyll, Mr. Hyde
Page Number: 80
Explanation and Analysis:

After the death of Sir Danvers, Dr. Jekyll begins to change his ways. Instead of being unreliable and constantly secluded, he becomes outgoing and social once more (unbeknownst to Utterson, Jekyll has become social again because he's not transformed into Hyde half the time).

Jekyll is operating under the naive belief that he can control Hyde forever, or just quit him "cold turkey." Jekyll is so confident that the good, rational part of his soul is in control that he surrounds himself with friends and well-wishers again as if nothing happened. In reality, Mr. Hyde hasn't gone away at all--on the contrary, Hyde is lurking just below the surface, waiting for the right time to strike. As we've heard, sin has no statute of limitations--once Mr. Hyde, always Mr. Hyde.

Chapter 8 Quotes

"O, sir," cried Poole, "do you think I do not know my master after twenty years? Do you think I do not know where his head comes to in the cabinet door, where I saw him every morning of my life? No, sir, that thing in the mask was never Dr. Jekyll--God knows what it was, but it was never Dr. Jekyll; and it is the belief of my heart that there was murder done."

Related Characters: Poole (speaker), Dr. Jekyll, Mr. Hyde
Page Number: 93
Explanation and Analysis:

Poole, Dr. Jekyll's old, faithful servant, insists that the figure locked in Dr. Jekyll's study isn't actually Dr. Jekyll at all. Poole has known Jekyll for 20 years, and can clearly tell that the Jekyll he knows is no longer present in the house. Poole's solution to the mystery of Jekyll's disappearance is that someone has murdered Jekyll and taken his place. But as we'll soon discover, the truth is far more disturbing. In reality, Jekyll's own hidden nature has consumed him: he has meddled with science and been punished for his experimentation with an awful curse. Mr. Hyde has finally triumphed over Jekyll: in other words, the evil side of Jekyll's soul has dominated the good.

Chapter 9 Quotes

What he told me in the next hour, I cannot bring my mind to
set on paper. I saw what I saw, I heard what I heard, and my soul
sickened at it; and yet now when that sight has faded from my
eyes, I ask myself if I believe it, and I cannot answer.

Related Characters: Dr. Hastie Lanyon (speaker), Dr. Jekyll, Mr. Hyde
Related Symbols: Letters and Documents
Page Number: 109
Explanation and Analysis:

Lanyon has just witnessed Mr. Hyde drink a potion and transform into Dr. Jekyll. Now that Dr. Jekyll has regained his true form, he tells Lanyon about the scientific discovery he's made: a discovery that allows him to turn into Mr. Hyde. Lanyon writes that he can't bring himself to write what Jekyll tells him next--presumably, Lanyon is going to hear about Dr. Jekyll's "career" as Mr. Hyde.

It's strange that even after Dr. Lanyon has seen first-hand evidence of the success of Dr. Jekyll's scientific discoveries, he continues to feel "sickened" by Jekyll. One could say that while Dr. Jekyll is the better scientist, Dr. Lanyon is the better human being. Lanyon instinctively avoids scientific discoveries that lead to evil, while Dr. Jekyll bravely (and recklessly) pursues his scientific research, leading him to transform into Mr. Hyde.

Chapter 10 Quotes

I looked down; my clothes hung formlessly on my shrunken limbs; the hand that lay on my knee was corded and hairy. I was once more Edward Hyde.

Related Characters: Dr. Jekyll (speaker), Mr. Hyde
Related Symbols: The Appearance of Evil, Letters and Documents
Page Number: 124
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Dr, Jekyll is sitting on a park bench in public. Suddenly, he finds himself transforming into Mr. Hyde, despite the fact that he hasn't drunk any of the potion that's supposed to enable such a transformation. Thus far, Jekyll has believed that he can control his dual nature: he can be Hyde one day and Jekyll the next. Now, Jekyll begins to realize that he can't control his spirit at all: once Hyde has been released, there's no controlling him.

Stevenson's description of Hyde's sudden, unexpected appearance parallels some of Sigmund Freud's ideas about the relationship between the conscious and unconscious mind. Mr. Hyde's unexpected appearances evoke the way the human unconscious can "jump out" at any time, no matter how rigorously one tries to control it. At the same time, Stevenson makes this duality physical in a horrifying way, again portraying Hyde as evil even down to his appearance--he is "shrunken," "corded," and "hairy," unlike the presumably healthy and wholesome Jekyll.

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Mr. Hyde Character Timeline in Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

The timeline below shows where the character Mr. Hyde appears in Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1
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...question and had worked himself up into a frightened state. Suddenly, a little girl and a man had appeared running from opposite streets and knocked into each other. The man had trampled... (full context)
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To Enfield, the strangest part of the incident was the way the man looked. It was so powerful and hateful that it caused him to sweat. Everyone involved... (full context)
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...see that Mr. Utterson is affected by the story too. He continues, troubled by how the man can be so obviously damnable but also celebrated for doing good things with his money.... (full context)
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...name, and Mr. Enfield doesn’t think much harm can come of telling it. It’s Mr. Hyde. (full context)
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Utterson asks what Mr. Hyde looks like, but Enfield can hardly describe it. He says that the man has a... (full context)
Chapter 2
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...entrusted to him by a Dr. Jekyll. The will bequeaths Dr. Jekyll’s estate to Edward Hyde and also notes that should Dr. Jekyll disappear for any reason for longer than three... (full context)
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...document has always angered Mr. Utterson. At first it was because he didn’t know Mr. Hyde, and didn’t know why this man should be placed so high above Dr. Jekyll’s own... (full context)
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...of medical opinion, but when Utterson hears that Dr. Lanyon has never heard of Edward Hyde, his restlessness returns. That night he can’t sleep. The nearby clock strikes six and he... (full context)
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...sleeps, the images become more repetitive and nightmarish but he can never make out Mr. Hyde’s face. He becomes obsessed with knowing what Mr. Hyde looks like. He thinks it might... (full context)
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...of the man in question and quickly surprises him at the door, addressing him. Mr. Hyde is afraid for a moment but answers to the name. Mr. Utterson introduces himself as... (full context)
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Mr. Utterson explains to Mr. Hyde that they have mutual friends, naming Dr. Jekyll as one of them. Mr. Hyde becomes... (full context)
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Mr. Utterson asks the servant if it is all right that he has seen Mr. Hyde going into the “old dissecting room” and the servant replies that Mr. Hyde has a... (full context)
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...of every moral wrong he has ever done or avoided. He is sure that Mr. Hyde has heinous deeds in his past, and Utterson resolves to protect Dr. Jekyll. He knows... (full context)
Chapter 3
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...he now has even more cause to worry and starts to tell him about Mr. Hyde. At the mention of this name, Dr. Jekyll shuts down the conversation. He assures Utterson... (full context)
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Dr. Jekyll lastly tries to explain to Mr. Utterson that he actually finds Mr. Hyde very interesting, and asks Utterson to try his best to treat Mr. Hyde as a... (full context)
Chapter 4
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A year later, another crime is committed by Mr. Hyde, this time even more hideous. A maid goes to bed in a house alone, and,... (full context)
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...and the maid focuses on him, but then notices that the other man is Mr. Hyde, who had visited her master once. She instinctively doesn’t like him. He is listening impatiently... (full context)
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...clue who it could be. Now seeing the broken stick, Utterson has no doubt that Hyde is the culprit. The policeman confirms that the maid called Hyde small and wicked-looking. Mr.... (full context)
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Hyde’s street comes into view. It is an odd collection of establishments, including a gin palace.... (full context)
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The policeman requests to search Hyde’s rooms. The old lady’s face is filled with “odious joy” as she expresses her interest... (full context)
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They take the book to the bank and are pleased to find that Hyde has thousands of pounds to his credit. Utterson declares that they will surely catch him;... (full context)
Chapter 5
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Dr. Jekyll is changed. Utterson asks whether Jekyll is concealing Hyde, to which Jekyll responds that he has heard the news and declares that he is... (full context)
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...think about it. He has one last question. He wants to know if it was Hyde that dictated the terms of his will. Jekyll admits that it was. Utterson knew it.... (full context)
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...the fire is making the room cheerful. Mr. Guest knows about Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and is an expert on handwriting. So Utterson mentions the murder and Mr. Guest thinks... (full context)
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...dinner but Guest inspects the signature and notices a distinct similarity between Dr. Jekyll’s and Hyde’s handwriting. They agree not to speak any further about the handwriting, but when Utterson is... (full context)
Chapter 6
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...of Sir Danvers Carew’s murder, huge rewards are offered for finding the murderer, but Mr. Hyde has disappeared. Rumors and tales surface about Mr. Hyde’s past misdemeanors, but as Hyde continues... (full context)
Chapter 7
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...rooms. They stop and look. Enfield expresses his relief that they will not hear from Hyde again. Utterson is less sure. He tells Enfield that he too saw Hyde only once... (full context)
Chapter 8
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...hiding their suspicions. Poole admits that he did recognize the man he saw—it was Mr. Hyde. He explains that Mr. Hyde is the only person other than Jekyll who enters the... (full context)
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...if he has to. The changed voice pleads mercy. Utterson hears that the voice is Hyde's and orders Poole to break down the door. Poole strikes with his axe. It takes... (full context)
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...will, much like the previous one but this time with Utterson’s name in place of Hyde’s. Utterson is astonished that Hyde has not destroyed this document. He finds another document, with... (full context)
Chapter 9
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Lanyon receives a visitor at midnight, and meets him on the porch. The visitor is a small, evil-looking man,... (full context)
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The visitor is very excitable and demands impatiently whether Lanyon has the drawer. Lanyon maintains his patience... (full context)
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The visitor asks Lanyon for a graduated glass and Lanyon fetches one for him. Then the man... (full context)
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...Utterson of is that the man that arrived at his house that night was Mr. Hyde. (full context)
Chapter 10
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...both physical and spiritual. But amid these horrible pains, comes something pleasurable—he turns into Mr. Hyde and feels a kind of reckless joy. (full context)
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...does with his more robust original one. He decides that the reason people looked on Hyde with such horror was because everyone is made of good and evil parts and so... (full context)
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...evil that now reigns over both beings. He becomes more and more obsessed with becoming Hyde, because every evil thought can be swiftly satisfied by drinking the potion. Jekyll prepares a... (full context)
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...But these deeds were becoming more monstrous and Dr. Jekyll at times cannot believe what Hyde has done, sometimes even trying to make amends for his evil twin. (full context)
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...night he woke up in bed to discover that he has woken up as Mr. Hyde. He is astonished, having gone to bed as Dr. Jekyll. He panics, but realizes that... (full context)
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...judgment. He starts to feel that the balance between his two selves is shifting toward Hyde, and feels he has to choose between them. He considers the advantages of each and... (full context)
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...For two months, he enjoyed the life of Dr. Jekyll again, being sociable and leaving Hyde’s Soho house empty. But one night, he feels the evil desires of Hyde bubbling up... (full context)
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...by doing as much good as he can. He succeeds for a while, but again Hyde’s desires begin to trouble him. This time the balance, he says, is finally overthrown. He... (full context)
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Hyde is quick-thinking, and, given that he is wanted for Danvers Carew's murder, he quickly decides... (full context)
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But again, as he is walking to breakfast, Jekyll is taken over by Hyde. He rushes to the upper room of his laboratory and makes the potion but the... (full context)
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Jekyll and Hyde’s relationship becomes more complicated. Hyde’s “terror of the gallows” drives him to seek refuge in... (full context)
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...Henry Jekyll. He must stop writing before the inevitable change occurs. He doesn’t know what Hyde will do, kill himself or continue to pace about the room, but he sees this... (full context)