Far From the Madding Crowd

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Bathsheba Everdene Character Analysis

Bathsheba, the orphaned daughter of townspeople, is raised by her aunt in the countryside. From a young age, she is used to managing things on her own: for example, her aunt has her take charge of milking cows and fetching supplies for the house. She is handsome and can be vain about her appearance. In many ways, even though Bathsheba is already independent and determined at the beginning of the novel, she matures over the course of the book. At first, she insists on her independence to the detriment of others’ feelings, as when she pursues Gabriel Oak without the intention of marrying him. Through the careless game that she later plays with Mr. Boldwood, she comes to recognize that independence is not necessarily the greatest good, and that it can be important to rely on others, just as it is crucial to understand the implications of one’s own actions on others. In some ways Bathsheba conforms to Victorian stereotypes about women; for example, she can be thoughtless and emotional. But she also defies such stereotypes by running the farm herself and learning to manage her emotions and face an often hostile, gossipy world outside.

Bathsheba Everdene Quotes in Far From the Madding Crowd

The Far From the Madding Crowd quotes below are all either spoken by Bathsheba Everdene or refer to Bathsheba Everdene. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Epic Allusion, Tragedy, and Illusions of Grandeur Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Penguin Classics edition of Far From the Madding Crowd published in 2003.
Chapter 1 Quotes

She did not adjust her hat, or pat her hair, or press a dimple into shape, or do any one thing to signify that any such intention had been her motive in taking up the glass. She simply observed herself as a fair product of Nature in a feminine direction—her expression seeming to glide into far-off though likely dramas in which men would play a part—vistas of probable triumphs—the smiles being of a phase suggesting that hearts were imagined as lost and won.

Related Characters: Bathsheba Everdene, Gabriel Oak
Page Number: 6
Explanation and Analysis:

Gabriel’s first image of Bathsheba is of a woman who clearly cares about her appearance and is eager to admire herself. Here, Gabriel notes that there’s no reason for her to look into the mirror—nothing to adjust—other than her vanity and pride. It’s not exactly a positive first impression. Nonetheless, Gabriel’s observation also sets up a number of the motivating forces of the novel. It foreshadows some of the book’s major conflicts, conflicts in which, indeed, “men would play a part.” While Bathsheba is described as majestic in her awareness of her own power over men, however, there’s no sense that she understands just what the consequences of such power may be.

As the narrator will state later on, Bathsheba knows little about how love functions beyond the surface—indeed, this ignorance will in many ways lead to her own suffering. Gabriel’s powers of observation are acute enough to allow him to study Bathsheba and foresee some of what awaits her in the future, even if he cannot, of course, foretell precisely what will unfold.

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Chapter 4 Quotes

“What I meant to tell you was only this,” she said eagerly, and yet half-conscious of the absurdity of the position she had made for herself: “that nobody has got me yet as a sweetheart, instead of my having a dozen as my aunt said; I hate to be thought men’s property in that way—though possibly I shall be to be had some day.”

Related Characters: Bathsheba Everdene (speaker), Gabriel Oak
Page Number: 26
Explanation and Analysis:

After Bathsheba’s aunt tells Gabriel that her niece has had plenty of suitors, and he goes away dejectedly, Bathsheba runs after Gabriel. He’s encouraged by her apparent eagerness, but soon it becomes clear that she hasn’t hurried after him in order to accept his proposal. Indeed, Bathsheba herself begins to realize that her purpose perhaps hasn’t merited such eagerness. Nonetheless, she wants to make clear to Gabriel that she won’t stand being considered as the property of a man, not to mention a girl to be handed around between a number of different suitors.

It’s not clear why exactly Bathsheba feels the need to share this conviction with Gabriel, especially as she admits that while she is free and independent now, she may not always be—a pragmatic acknowledgement of the historical reality in Victorian England, in which women were subject to their husband’s authority far more than in recent times. But for now, it does seem both that Bathsheba wants to maintain her independence, and that she wants Gabriel to understand her desire for such independence. He’s seen her at her most proud and vain, and she hopes that he can come to recognize the more positive sides of such character traits as well.

Chapter 12 Quotes

Among these heavy yeomen a feminine figure glided—the single one of her sex that the room contained. She moved between them as a chaise between carts, was heard after them as a romance after sermons, and was felt among them like a breeze among furnaces. It had required a little determination—far more than she had at first imagined—to take up a position here, for at her first entry the lumbering dialogues had ceased, nearly every face had been turned towards her, and those that were already turned rigidly fixed there.

Related Characters: Bathsheba Everdene
Page Number: 79
Explanation and Analysis:

For the first time, Bathsheba attends the corn market at Casterbridge: she’s the only woman among the many farmers that have come to buy and sell their goods. While Bathsheba seems entirely comfortable and at ease here, such apparent confidence belies her uncertainty. She’s acutely aware of how much everyone is ogling her: the extra level of scrutiny that women always have to face in her society is exacerbated by the fact that she’s occupying a role that’s quite rare for women, being the owner of a farm herself. At the same time, part of Bathsheba does appreciate the fact that all eyes on her. Rather than cowing in the face of attention, she is inspired by it to act the part of a woman in authority until she becomes it. Bathsheba is described as a kind of breath of fresh air for the other men—a “breeze among furnaces”—that shakes up the monotony of daily life and suggests changes to come.

Chapter 13 Quotes

So very idly and unreflectingly was this deed done. Of love, as a spectacle Bathsheba had a fair knowledge; but of love subjectively she knew nothing.

Related Characters: Bathsheba Everdene
Related Symbols: The Valentine
Page Number: 87
Explanation and Analysis:

Bathsheba and Liddy have been teasing each other about the idea of sending a valentine to Boldwood instead of to little Teddy Coggan, as Bathsheba had first intended. They decide on it almost thoughtlessly, though Liddy in particular seems to derive a certain amount of glee from the idea of the serious, grave Boldwood receiving such a note. Bathsheba, in turn, adds a further element of intrigue by placing, at the last moment, a joke seal saying “Marry me” on the envelope.

As the chapter ends, the narrator foreshadows some of the major conflicts to come, suggesting that as “unreflectingly” as Bathsheba acted, she will have more than occasion to reflect on it in the future. So much of this novel, indeed, deals with the unpredictable and in many ways unstoppable consequences of seemingly unimportant, circumstantial events. But in this case, disaster is invited by cause and effect directly linked to a careless action that was rooted in a flaw in Bathsheba’s character. She is vain, flirtatious, and proud, and, as the narrator notes, her apparent confidence masks a greater immaturity. Bathsheba thinks of love as a natural extension of the admiring gazes of the men at the market, for instance: a “spectacle” that may make her the center of attention, may even cause her some discomfort, but one in which the stakes are relatively low. The rest of the novel will depict her increasing knowledge and maturity regarding the “subjective” elements of love and its relationship to pride.

Chapter 15 Quotes

“Our mis’ess will bring us all to the bad,” said Henery. “Ye may depend on that—with her new farming ways. And her ignorance is terrible to hear. Why only yesterday she cut a rasher of bacon the longways of the flitch!”
“Ho-ho-ho!” said the assembly, the maltster’s feeble note being heard amid the rest as that of a different instrument: “heu-heu-heu!”

Related Characters: Henry (Henery) Fray (speaker), Bathsheba Everdene, The maltster
Page Number: 93
Explanation and Analysis:

As is often the case, the farm hands gather at Warren’s Malt-house in order to discuss the local gossip and affairs of the village. Here they’re talking about their new mistress, Bathsheba, who has recently taken over from her uncle. While a number of the farm hands already respect and admire her, Henery Fray is far more skeptical—and indeed, his proclamations come to sway the others, at least temporarily. Henery’s criticisms take shape in two ways. First, he suggests that Bathsheba is going to meddle with how things have always been done, by introducing her “new farming ways.” Weatherbury, unlike a city like Bath or London, is described in the novel as largely unchanging through the years, even if it is beginning to be affected by industrialization. As a newcomer, even if she doesn’t do anything to suggest the idea of total transformation, Bathsheba is naturally looked upon with suspicion by those who see any change as too much.

Secondly, Henery criticizes Bathsheba’s “ignorance” regarding farming in general. His example proves wildly funny to the others, including the maltster, although the reference to her misuse of a rasher is so specific that this shared humor may well be absent for the non-specialist reader. Indeed, the arcane nature of the charge is meant, in itself, to provoke a comic response and to undermine the credibility of the men’s criticism. At the same time, Henery is skeptical of the very possibility of a woman being a mistress of a farmer: he resents Bathsheba’s authority over him and the others, and some of his criticisms undoubtedly stem from that prejudice.

Chapter 16 Quotes

Boldwood’s blindness to the difference between approving of what circumstance suggests, and originating what it does not, was well matched by Bathsheba’s insensibility to the possible great issues of little beginnings.

Related Characters: Bathsheba Everdene, Mr. Boldwood
Related Symbols: The Valentine
Page Number: 103
Explanation and Analysis:

Boldwood has been attempting to figure out how Bathsheba could have sent him such a forward valentine, with its bold seal stating, “Marry me.” Here he watches Bathsheba across the room at the corn market as he tries to reconcile her lack of apparent interest in him with the flirtatious boldness put into evidence by the valentine. This passage suggests that Boldwood and Bathsheba are equally blind to the reality of their situations, though in different ways. Boldwood is too eager to create a reality based on too slim evidence: clinging to this apparent proof, he’s willing to wave away any other, more convincing, objections. Bathsheba, meanwhile, failed to understand that such a careless decision might have great consequences—including the consequences of Boldwood’s attraction, jealousy (as will be seen a few lines later as he watches her negotiate with another farmer), and ultimately obsession. Even while Bathsheba never manages to fall in love with Boldwood, then, the book suggests that in some ways their weaknesses have something similar about them: they both are faced with lessons to learn from such weakness, though Bathsheba will learn hers better than her suitor will.

Chapter 19 Quotes

In every point of view ranging from politic to solicitous it was desirable that she, a lonely girl, should marry, and marry this earnest, well to do, and respected man. He was close to her doors: his standing was sufficient: his qualities were even supererogatory. Had she felt, which she did not, any wish whatever for the married state in the abstract, she could not reasonably have rejected him as a woman who frequently appealed to her understanding for deliverance from her whims.

Related Characters: Bathsheba Everdene, Mr. Boldwood
Page Number: 113-114
Explanation and Analysis:

Boldwood has asked Bathsheba to marry her, and she considers this, her second marriage proposal, with slightly more reflection than her first. Having lived and grown a little more since she so eagerly, if thoughtlessly, ran after Gabriel, she now recognizes that marriage is not necessarily just a matter of love but also a social, economic, and moral question. She takes a step back in order to judge Boldwood as coolly as she judges the labor done on her farm: in this she finds little to object to in his character and social position. Bathsheba understands that while part of the problem in accepting Gabriel’s proposal would have been their different social statuses, no such gap exists between herself and Boldwood. And his moral standing is no less suitable.

Nonetheless, Bathsheba’s most well-considered judgments cannot make her desire something that she does not. It’s not simply that Bathsheba doesn’t love Boldwood; the book also emphasizes here that she doesn’t want the “married state” at all. Still, Bathsheba never declares that she’ll never marry, that she refuses the institution as such; she simply wishes to remain independent for as long as it suits her, despite all the advantages to the contrary choice.

Bathsheba would have submitted to an indignant chastisement for her levity had Gabriel protested that he was loving her at the same time: the impetuosity of passion unrequited is bearable, even if it stings and anathematizes; there is a triumph in the humiliation and tenderness in the strife. This is what she had been expecting, and what she had not got.

Related Characters: Bathsheba Everdene, Gabriel Oak
Page Number: 117-118
Explanation and Analysis:

Bathsheba has confided in Gabriel about Boldwood’s feelings for her, and after she asks what he thinks of her conduct, he criticizes it sharply (though not cruelly). Bathsheba’a pride is hurt by this criticism, and she tries to account for it by suggesting that Gabriel merely wishes she’d marry him instead—but he softly corrects her, saying that he no longer thinks of or wishes for this. His apparent indifference seems almost malicious to Bathsheba when joined to his poor opinion of her behavior to Boldwood. While she herself can’t imagine being with Gabriel, she likes to imagine that he’s still in love with her, and the evidence to the contrary wounds her. Bathsheba finds it difficult to recognize that Gabriel, too, has a proud character, and that he too only reluctantly reveals all his weakness to others—perhaps why he’s unwilling to share with Bathsheba that he still has feelings with her.

Chapter 28 Quotes

Though in one sense a woman of the world it was, after all, that world of daylight coteries, and green carpets, wherein cattle form the passing crowd and winds the busy hum; where a quiet family of rabbits or hares lives on the other side of your party-wall, where your neighbour is everybody in the tything, and where calculation is confined to market days. Of the fabricated tastes of good fashionable society she knew but little, and of the formulated self-indulgence of bad, nothing at all.

Related Characters: Bathsheba Everdene
Page Number: 164
Explanation and Analysis:

The narrator continues to attempt to explain how Bathsheba, who until now has been independent, headstrong, and self-reliant, has fallen for Troy in so dramatic a way. It’s not only that the distance she had to fall was so great—that point that was made in the previous quotation. Here, the book emphasizes the particular setting of the book, and the extent to which Bathsheba has been confined all her life in this setting. In many ways, Hardy does show that life in the countryside of England, in his fictionalized Wessex, is radically different than in the city. Bathsheba’s “society” is made up of a “quiet family of rabbits” or cattle that “form the passing crowd.” She has been ogled by other farmers, but has not yet had to navigate in an interpersonally complex social world that has its own codes and ways of doing things.

Hardy never states straight out that country life is simple while urban life is complex. Indeed, much of the novel shows the complexities and conflicts within natural laws. In this sense Bathsheba is increasingly a “woman of the world”; but the novel emphasizes that this world has little to do with another world that exists alongside it, and which Troy knows how to navigate deftly.

Chapter 30 Quotes

“You are taking too much upon yourself!” she said vehemently. “Everybody is upon me—everybody. It is unmanly to attack a woman so! I have nobody in the world to fight my battles for me, but no mercy is shown. Yet if a thousand of you sneer and say things against me, I will not be put down!”

Related Characters: Bathsheba Everdene (speaker), Mr. Boldwood
Page Number: 179-180
Explanation and Analysis:

Bathsheba has attempted to avoid Boldwood, since she’s just sent a letter to him telling him that she cannot marry him, but by the luck of circumstance she’s run into him on the road anyway. Now Boldwood loses his grave, somber demeanor entirely, beginning to rage against his lot—recognizing not only that Bathsheba has refused him, but that her affections belong to another, to Troy. Bathsheba initially tries to suffer Boldwood’s anger in silence, but when he claims that this is all “woman’s folly,” she begins to lose her temper herself.

Bathsheba is fed up with being judged, observed, and condemned on all sides. As a woman and the mistress of the farm, she is subject to more scrutiny than anyone else, and, in addition to that, she lacks a single other person who can truly understand what her situation is like. Her conflicts are all her own: there’s no one she can turn to who might advise her exactly how to act or what to do. Bathsheba clearly understands the double standard that applies to her, and the unfairness of the way she’s treated—even if she has erred gravely. At the end, nevertheless, she reclaims some of her pride, not to flatter herself but simply to maintain a sense of self and sanity in a hostile world.

Chapter 35 Quotes

Having from their youth up been entirely unaccustomed to any liquor stronger than cider or mild ale, it was no wonder that they had succumbed one and all with extraordinary uniformity after the lapse of about one hour.
Gabriel was greatly depressed. This debauch boded ill for that wilful and fascinating mistress whom the faithful man even now felt within him as the eidolon of all that was sweet and bright and hopeless.

Related Characters: Bathsheba Everdene, Gabriel Oak
Page Number: 215
Explanation and Analysis:

In honor of his recent marriage to Bathsheba, Troy has declared an extra celebration as part of the annual harvest supper held at the farm. He’s told all the women and children to go home and for all men (unless they’re not up to the challenge—in which case they may risk losing their jobs) to enjoy brandy with him. Neither Bathsheba nor many of the farm hands wanted this extra level of revelry, but Troy insisted. Now, as Gabriel begins to prepare for a heavy storm, he sees that all the farm hands have fallen into a drunken stupor.

While he’s upset and angry, Gabriel knows not to be too harsh on the men—it’s Troy’s fault that they’ve succumbed after such debauchery. He’s upset that no one is able to assist him on the farm, but he’s also upset because he recognizes that this is an inauspicious beginning to Bathsheba’s own marriage. Gabriel knows how proud Bathsheba continues to be, how accustomed to insisting on her own will, but now that will is matched and perhaps exceeded, especially given that it’s a man now in authority. This passage is a reminder that Gabriel’s feelings for Bathsheba, his “eidolon” (an idealized, often phantom-like image), have not gone away: he watches with trepidation for the conflicts that he fears will ensue.

Chapter 40 Quotes

Her pride was indeed brought low by this despairing perception of spoliation by marriage with a less pure nature than her own. She chafed to and fro in rebelliousness, like a caged leopard, her whole soul was in arms, and the blood fired her face. Until she had met Troy Bathsheba had been proud of her position as a woman; it had been a glory to her to know that her lips had been touched by no man’s on earth, that her waist had never been encircled by a lover’s arm. She hated herself now.

Related Characters: Bathsheba Everdene, Sergeant Francis Troy
Page Number: 239
Explanation and Analysis:

It hasn’t been very long since Bathsheba married Troy, but the excitement of the courtship has certainly faded away. Now, it’s become clear that Troy was never supportive of Bathsheba’s pride even in its more valuable manifestations, in her independence and self-reliance. For a long time—up to and including her refusal of marriage to Gabriel and to Boldwood—Bathsheba had felt that the bar for giving up her independence had to be set high. Yet Troy didn’t exactly meet such a bar; he simply seduced Bathsheba according to another logic entirely.

Bathsheba, though, hasn’t quite learned to submit to her husband as he would like, and as the standards of Victorian society required. She understands that she does have to submit to many of her husband’s decisions, but she doesn’t like it, and refuses to accept his authority without difficulty. The description of Bathsheba as a “caged leopard” bolsters such an idea of liberty now penned in and a free spirit now in chains. Bathsheba’s new situation of dependence doesn’t precisely, however, make her despise her husband: it more accurately makes her despise herself, as someone who isn’t able to maintain her own independence. This is portrayed as perhaps the greatest tragedy of Bathsheba’s marriage.

Chapter 42 Quotes

The one feat alone—that of dying—by which a mean condition could be resolved into a grand one, Fanny had achieved. And to that had destiny subjoined this reencounter to-night, which had, in Bathsheba’s wild imagining, turned her companion’s failure to success, her humiliation to triumph, her lucklessness to ascendancy; it had thrown over herself a garish light of mockery, and set upon all things about her an ironical smile. But even Bathsheba’s heated fancy failed to endow that innocent white countenance with any triumphant consciousness of the pain she was retaliating for her pain with all the merciless rigour of the Mosaic law: “Burning for burning; wound for wound; strife for strife.”

Related Characters: Bathsheba Everdene, Fanny Robbin
Page Number: 260
Explanation and Analysis:

Bathsheba has looked into the coffin and been given incontrovertible proof that Fanny was pregnant—between the color of her hair and the circumstantial evidence, she has guessed too that her own husband was the baby’s father. Bathsheba’s feelings for Fanny, nevertheless, remain very complex. On the one hand, she continues to feel pity for Fanny, who, like Bathsheba herself, suffered at the hands of Troy. Both women have felt alone and isolated in a world made by and for men. And yet on the other hand, Bathsheba recognizes Fanny as her full rival, especially since Bathsheba continues on some level to love her husband—and yet the fact of Fanny’s death means that it would be cruel for Bathsheba to feel angry at or jealous of the girl.

Bathsheba seems almost to want Fanny’s body to mock her, to give her a justification for hating her, even as she knows that would be wrong. While she cannot find any shred of “triumph” in Fanny’s expression, Bathsheba thinks of the Mosaic law—the one that includes the idea of an “eye for an eye”—in helping her to come to terms with her own relationship to Fanny. Bathsheba, indeed, feels like she is being made to suffer personally in retaliation for what Fanny has suffered—suffering that, at least until this point, Troy has managed to escape entirely.

Chapter 50 Quotes

“I don’t know—at least I cannot tell you. It is difficult for a woman to define her feelings in a language which is chiefly made by men to express theirs.”

Related Characters: Bathsheba Everdene (speaker), Mr. Boldwood
Page Number: 308
Explanation and Analysis:

Boldwood is trying to convince Bathsheba once again to give him a positive response; this time, though, he’s attempting to extract not an actual agreement to marry him, but a promise to at least consider marrying him in six years, since she’s not yet a legal widow. As Bathsheba, who doesn’t want to marry Boldwood any more than she ever has, tries to tell Boldwood that she does respect him, he insists on knowing exactly how much she likes and respects him. It’s that demand that leads Bathsheba to the frustration she expresses in this passage. She’s frustrated that Boldwood, as always, is asking more of her than she can give, pushing and pressuring her in a way she finds overwhelming, given that she has no one to turn to of her gender and social position.

Here, she links that sense of isolation to the very language she uses. It’s not, of course, that only men speak English: the idea is that public life in society is, in her experience, directed by men—the laws that define and circumscribe everyone’s actions, the articles in the newspapers, even the gossip at Warren’s malt-house, are all written or spoken by men. Bathsheba may assert her own authority by claiming her own right to such language, but here she has a more sober outlook on the possibility of this act of reclamation, suggesting that a woman trying to play by men’s rules may never be able to express herself just as she wishes.

Chapter 53 Quotes

The household convulsion had made her herself again. The temporary coma had ceased, and activity had come with the necessity for it. Deeds of endurance which seem ordinary in philosophy are rare in conduct: and Bathsheba was astonishing all around her now, for her philosophy was her conduct, and she seldom thought practicable what she did not practise. She was the stuff of which great men’s mothers are made.

Related Characters: Bathsheba Everdene
Page Number: 333
Explanation and Analysis:

Boldwood has just shot Troy and has left the house in order to give himself up to the authorities. When Troy had ordered Bathsheba to come along home with him, she had been frozen in place: this was the culmination of the gradual erosion of her cool, calm sense of authority. Now, however, the crisis seems to have jolted her back into such an authoritative position. Just as in the corn market, everyone in Boldwood’s home now looks at and admires her; here, however, Bathsheba isn’t flattered. She is matter-of-fact about this ability to keep calm amid a tragedy. At the same time, even the novel itself, which mostly portrays Bathsheba as a competent and successful businesswoman, reveals itself to be a product of its time, describing Bathsheba not as a great woman herself but as the kind of woman who might give birth to a great son.

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Bathsheba Everdene Character Timeline in Far From the Madding Crowd

The timeline below shows where the character Bathsheba Everdene appears in Far From the Madding Crowd. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 4
Women in a Man’s World Theme Icon
...day and watch for her through the hedge. He finds out that her name is Bathsheba Everdene, and that in a week her cow will give no more milk. She no... (full context)
Conflict and the Laws of Nature Theme Icon
...might be a way to resolve such silliness. But he needs an excuse to visit Bathsheba’s aunt. Then, one of his ewes dies: he decides to carry its lamb in a... (full context)
Epic Allusion, Tragedy, and Illusions of Grandeur Theme Icon
Class Status and Mobility Theme Icon
...modesty but also ill breeding of the rural world, the narrator notes. Mrs. Hurst says Bathsheba is out but invites him in, and he says he’s brought a lamb for her... (full context)
Women in a Man’s World Theme Icon
Pride and Penance Theme Icon
After a hundred yards, Gabriel hears a voice: Bathsheba is running after him, and he blushes. She pauses, out of breath and panting, and... (full context)
Women in a Man’s World Theme Icon
Pride and Penance Theme Icon
...and works hard, even if he is only an everyday man. He steps forward, but Bathsheba backs away, and with round eyes says she never agreed to marry him. Dismayed, Gabriel... (full context)
Women in a Man’s World Theme Icon
Pride and Penance Theme Icon
Gabriel asks why Bathsheba can’t marry him: she says she doesn’t love him. Gabriel says he’s fine with her... (full context)
Pride and Penance Theme Icon
Class Status and Mobility Theme Icon
Gabriel, surprised and admiring, says he’d been thinking of that himself. But this disconcerts Bathsheba, though he hastily says that it is in spite of that that he can’t help... (full context)
Chapter 5
Women in a Man’s World Theme Icon
Gabriel hears that Bathsheba has left the neighborhood for a place called Weatherbury—the separation allows him to idealize her... (full context)
Epic Allusion, Tragedy, and Illusions of Grandeur Theme Icon
Conflict and the Laws of Nature Theme Icon
Class Status and Mobility Theme Icon
...covers his face with his hands. Soon, though, he rises up, and gives thanks that Bathsheba hadn’t married him. (full context)
Chapter 6
Pride and Penance Theme Icon
Class Status and Mobility Theme Icon
...set off the six miles for Shottsford (though he wants to avoid the sight of Bathsheba). He follows a winding path through the landscape. After six miles all is black. Gabriel... (full context)
Epic Allusion, Tragedy, and Illusions of Grandeur Theme Icon
Women in a Man’s World Theme Icon
...every night. And she’s not married! they exclaim. Gabriel suddenly wonders if they’re talking about Bathsheba. (full context)
Women in a Man’s World Theme Icon
...if she happens to need a shepherd. She lifts the veil from her face: it’s Bathsheba. She doesn’t speak, and he mechanically repeats his question. (full context)
Chapter 7
Women in a Man’s World Theme Icon
Pride and Penance Theme Icon
Bathsheba is between amusement and concern: she’s not embarrassed. Hesitatingly, she says she does need a... (full context)
Pride and Penance Theme Icon
Class Status and Mobility Theme Icon
Gabriel, astonished, walks to the village, thinking too of how quickly Bathsheba has changed from naïve girl to cool, calm supervisor. As he passes through the churchyard,... (full context)
Chapter 8
Epic Allusion, Tragedy, and Illusions of Grandeur Theme Icon
Women in a Man’s World Theme Icon
...Coggan chimes in, whose will to be good wasn’t strong enough. Henery Fray remarks that Bathsheba was never that pretty then, and Coggan remarks he hopes her temper is as nice... (full context)
Epic Allusion, Tragedy, and Illusions of Grandeur Theme Icon
Class Status and Mobility Theme Icon
...they all say. Gabriel thanks them modestly, but decides to himself that he’ll never let Bathsheba see him playing his flute (a wisdom worthy of Minerva). (full context)
Epic Allusion, Tragedy, and Illusions of Grandeur Theme Icon
...with Coggan, who’s offered him lodging. Then Henery returns, out of breath, to remark that Bathsheba has in fact caught Bailiff Pennyways stealing some barley. Miss Everdene flew at him, and... (full context)
Epic Allusion, Tragedy, and Illusions of Grandeur Theme Icon
Women in a Man’s World Theme Icon
...the main house, except the maltster, who remains inside like always. From the bedroom window Bathsheba calls down to ask if any of the men can make inquiries about Fanny. Jacob... (full context)
Women in a Man’s World Theme Icon
Then, though, Mary-ann says she did have a young man, a soldier in Casterbridge. Bathsheba asks Billy Smallbury to go tomorrow to find him. Uneasily, she wishes every goodnight. Meanwhile,... (full context)
Chapter 9
Conflict and the Laws of Nature Theme Icon
Bathsheba’s farm had once been the center of a manor, though now it is more modest.... (full context)
Women in a Man’s World Theme Icon
Mary-ann Money, the charwoman, is scrubbing outside, when Bathsheba asks her to pause: they hear a horse clap up to the door. Mrs. Coggan,... (full context)
Women in a Man’s World Theme Icon
Bathsheba asks who Mr. Boldwood is. Liddy says he’s a 40-year-old, unmarried gentleman farmer. He had... (full context)
Class Status and Mobility Theme Icon
Now alone, Liddy asks Bathsheba if anyone ever wanted to marry her. After a pause, she said one man did... (full context)
Chapter 10
Women in a Man’s World Theme Icon
Pride and Penance Theme Icon
After changing, Bathsheba enters the kitchen, where the men have gathered, and pours out some coins on the... (full context)
Women in a Man’s World Theme Icon
Bathsheba calls for Joseph Poorgrass and asks what he does on the farm and what he... (full context)
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...Fray says the shepherd will need someone under him: Cain Ball is a good pick. Bathsheba asks how he came by his name; Henery says his mother, not one to read... (full context)
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Bathsheba asks Gabriel if he understands his duties: Gabriel does, but is stunned by her coolness—he... (full context)
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...left for Melchester. He only found out that the soldier was higher than a private. Bathsheba says someone should tell Mr. Boldwood. As she rises, she makes a short speech saying... (full context)
Chapter 12
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...one exception among the farmers—one with full Roman features, an air of dignity and calm. Bathsheba’s convinced that he’s unmarried, though he is around forty years old. (full context)
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After the market, Bathsheba tells Liddy that it was as bad as being married with eyes all on her.... (full context)
Chapter 13
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On February 13, Bathsheba and Liddy are sitting by the piano, and Liddy asks Bathsheba to play the Bible... (full context)
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After a silence, Bathsheba says she forgot about a valentine she’d bought for little Teddy Coggan. She writes a... (full context)
Chapter 14
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...it’s addressed to the new shepherd at Weatherbury Farm. Boldwood realizes it’s a mistake—it’s for Miss Everdene’s shepherd, not his. He suddenly sees Gabriel on the ridge, and says he’ll take the... (full context)
Chapter 15
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...the cart-horse stables. Complaining about their hard work, they order cider. The maltster asks how Bathsheba is getting along without a bailiff, and Henery says she’ll regret it—there’s no way she... (full context)
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...had ominous dreams, and have seen white cats and other strange omens. Henery adds that Bathsheba is remarkably ignorant in some ways, like in cutting a rasher the wrong way. Everyone... (full context)
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...absolves her of a great deal. Gabriel sternly says he won’t allow such talk about Miss Everdene . Turning to Poorgrass, he asks if he too has spoken against her, and he... (full context)
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...leaves with Cain. Boldwood leaves with him, and as they approach the field he draws Bathsheba’s letter, and asks if Gabriel knows the handwriting. Blushing, Gabriel identifies it, as he realizes... (full context)
Chapter 16
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On Saturday in the market, Boldwood really looks at Bathsheba for the first time. He’s long considered women as remote phenomena more than real beings.... (full context)
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Watching Bathsheba negotiate with a farmer, Boldwood suddenly becomes hotly jealous. Bathsheba realizes Boldwood is finally staring... (full context)
Chapter 17
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...perfect balance between antagonistic forces. Now that he’s thrown off, he’s subject to extremes, though Bathsheba would never be able to imagine such intensity coming from him. (full context)
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Boldwood comes to the stable door and looks towards Bathsheba’s farm, seeing her, Gabriel, and Cainy Ball. Seeing Bathsheba lights him up, and he resolves... (full context)
Chapter 18
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Finally Boldwood does call on Bathsheba, but she isn’t at home—he’s forgotten that she is mistress of an estate. Indeed, he... (full context)
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Boldwood comes up and says hello to Bathsheba, who finds him severe and serious, and tries to withdraw. Boldwood, though, pursues her. Simply... (full context)
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Bathsheba stammers that she never should have sent the valentine, as it was thoughtless. Boldwood exclaims... (full context)
Chapter 19
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Bathsheba muses that Boldwood is so kind to offer her everything she could want. Many women... (full context)
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The next day Bathsheba finds Gabriel grinding his sheers with Cainy Ball. She asks to speak with Gabriel alone.... (full context)
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Gabriel adds that Bathsheba is to blame for playing pranks on a man like Boldwood. She cries that she... (full context)
Chapter 20
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On Sunday afternoon a number of men run up to the house and tell Bathsheba that 60 or 70 sheep have broken the fence and gotten into a field of... (full context)
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The first sheep dies, and Bathsheba grows increasingly agitated. Little by little, her conviction not to call Gabriel wanes. Finally, she... (full context)
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15 minutes later, Gabriel returns. He looks at her, and Bathsheba, her eyes full of gratitude, still chastises him for his unkindness. He murmurs confusedly, and... (full context)
Chapter 21
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...time since his great misfortune, Gabriel feels independent and happier, though he remains attached to Bathsheba. It’s June 1st and still sheep-shearing season: the landscape is green and full of ferns... (full context)
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...and Temperance and Soberness Miller are twisting the fleeces into wool. Behind them all is Bathsheba, watching carefully. (full context)
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Bathsheba watches Gabriel lop off the fleece of a sheep and, seeing its flush, murmurs that... (full context)
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But Gabriel’s contentment is interrupted by the appearance of Farmer Boldwood, who crosses towards Bathsheba. They speak in low tones, inaudible to Gabriel, though he imagines it’s not about the... (full context)
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Bathsheba leaves Boldwood and then reappears 15 minutes later in a new riding habit: she and... (full context)
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...home has no need for a husband. Fray often objects to such determined women as Bathsheba: now he remarks that he once gave her advice, and she couldn’t care less. He... (full context)
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...fellow who might like her. Gabriel remains silent, however: his good mood has gone away. Bathsheba had hinted she might give him the post of bailiff. Now he realizes he was... (full context)
Chapter 22
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The night of the shearing supper, Bathsheba sits by the table, flushed and eyes sparkling. Boldwood appears at the gate and Bathsheba... (full context)
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Gabriel notices that Boldwood has gone. His thoughts are interrupted by Bathsheba asking for his flute, since she’s been asked to sing herself. Just then Boldwood comes... (full context)
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Bathsheba says, trembling, that she will try to love Boldwood, and will marry him if she... (full context)
Chapter 23
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Bathsheba is preparing to close the farm before going to bed. Gabriel usually precedes her and... (full context)
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After inspecting the buildings, Bathsheba goes to the farm paddock, peering at the Devon cows inside. She goes back through... (full context)
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In the light Bathsheba can see that the man is a soldier, nothing like the sinister figure she’d momentarily... (full context)
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...as he apologizes to the “charming” lady, more beautiful than any woman he’s ever seen. Bathsheba asks who he is: his name is Sergeant Troy, and he’s lodging here. After he... (full context)
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Bathsheba rushes inside and asks Liddy if any gentleman-looking soldier is staying in the village. It... (full context)
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Bathsheba, nonetheless, isn’t entirely offended: women like her can put up with unconventional behavior when it... (full context)
Chapter 24
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A week or two after the shearing, Bathsheba is at her hayfields watching Coggan and Clark mowing when she sees Troy appear in... (full context)
Chapter 25
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...would rather he leave, but he claims he’d rather her curses than another woman’s kisses. Bathsheba is left speechless. (full context)
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Bathsheba simply says, turning away, that she can’t allow strangers to be bold and impudent even... (full context)
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...if she reads French, then mentions a proverb that translates, “he chastens that loves well.” Bathsheba remarks at his rhetorical skill, but insists that she derives no pleasure from it: he... (full context)
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Distracted, Bathsheba wonders what time it is: he looks at his watch, then cries that she should... (full context)
Chapter 26
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It’s late June now, and Bathsheba is watching the Weatherbury bees swarming in a haze. Since all the others are engaged... (full context)
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Bathsheba says she’s never seen the sword-exercise, and after pausing she says she’d like to. Troy... (full context)
Chapter 27
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At eight in the evening, Bathsheba arrives at an uncultivated hollow among ferns, before turning around and going back home. Then,... (full context)
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Troy is an excellent marksman, and he dazzles Bathsheba, especially when he cuts off just one lock of her hair. He points to a... (full context)
Chapter 28
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Bathsheba now loves Troy in the way that self-reliant women do when they lose their self-reliance,... (full context)
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Gabriel recognizes this love and it pains him. He decides to speak to Bathsheba, using her treatment of Boldwood as excuse. He finds her one day walking through the... (full context)
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Bathsheba insists that she must clear up any mistake. She didn’t promise Boldwood anything: she respects... (full context)
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Pale, Bathsheba tells him to leave the farm. Gabriel calmly says this is the second time she’s... (full context)
Chapter 29
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30 minutes later Bathsheba arrives home. Troy has just said goodbye for two days, since he’ll be visiting friends... (full context)
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In the kitchen Liddy, Temperance, and Mary-ann are speaking of Troy and Bathsheba: she bursts in and asks who they’re speaking of. After a pause Liddy tells her:... (full context)
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Alone with Liddy in the parlor, Bathsheba admits that she does in fact love Troy—she has to tell someone. She sends Liddy... (full context)
Chapter 30
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To avoid Boldwood upon his return, Bathsheba decides to visit Liddy at her sister’s, as the girl has been granted a week’s... (full context)
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...again asks what happened to her conviction that she would grow to care for him. Bathsheba repeats that she never promised him anything, and asks him to think more kindly of... (full context)
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Bathsheba repeats that she’s colder than he thinks, a result of an unprotected childhood in a... (full context)
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Bathsheba knows that Troy is about to return to Weatherbury, and fears a quarrel between him... (full context)
Chapter 31
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...driver has stolen their horse. But the keeper’s lantern casts a light over the driver—it’s Bathsheba. She’s driving to Bath, she says: she had to leave at once. Gabriel says they... (full context)
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Bathsheba had decided she could either keep Troy away from Weatherbury, or give up Troy entirely.... (full context)
Chapter 32
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After a week, there’s still no sign of Bathsheba: then Mary-ann receives a letter from her saying she’ll be kept there by business another... (full context)
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...thinks the soldier was Troy: he saw them sit on a park bench, and saw Bathsheba begin to cry. When they left, though, she looked white and happy. When Gabriel asks... (full context)
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On Gabriel’s prodding, Cain describes Bathsheba’s beautiful dress and hair. After lush descriptions of the houses, shops, and people of Bath,... (full context)
Chapter 33
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That evening, Gabriel is leaning over Coggan’s garden gate when he hears Bathsheba and Liddy’s voices from a carriage. Gabriel feels great relief. He lingers there until seeing... (full context)
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He asks Liddy to see Miss Everdene , but, in an odd mood, she says the lady cannot. Boldwood decides he must... (full context)
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...servant: he agrees. Boldwood asks if he preferred her, why he ruined things in Weatherbury. Bathsheba ensnared him for a time, Troy says: now that’s over. Boldwood hands him fifty sovereigns:... (full context)
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They hear a pit-pat, and Troy says he must leave to meet Bathsheba, who’s expecting him, and wish her good-bye according to Boldwood’s proposal. He may hide and... (full context)
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When Bathsheba runs off, Troy mockingly asks Boldwood, whose face is nervous and clammy, if he should... (full context)
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...back to Boldwood, telling him to read. It is an announcement of Troy’s marriage to Bathsheba. Gleefully, Troy lists all Boldwood has paid him, first for one woman then the other.... (full context)
Chapter 34
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...window of the farm. Sergeant Troy is looking leisurely out the window: Coggan exclaims that Bathsheba has married him. Gabriel looks at the ground, amazed all the same that it’s been... (full context)
Chapter 35
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...announce that it’s also their wedding feast, so he’s brought brandy for all the men. Bathsheba asks him not to give them more alcohol: one farmhand agrees that they’ve had enough.... (full context)
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Bathsheba leaves indignantly, followed by the women and children. Gabriel stays long enough to be polite,... (full context)
Chapter 36
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Lightning begins to strike. Gabriel sees a light in Bathsheba’s bedroom, and then more flashes, illuminating the fields. Gabriel wearily wipes his brow and carries... (full context)
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As Bathsheba fetches reed sheaves for Gabriel, they hear the first “Stygian” thunder following the heavenly light.... (full context)
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...the tall tree on the hill down its length in a loud crack: Gabriel tells Bathsheba they narrowly escaped, and she should go down. After a silence, they say that the... (full context)
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Bathsheba continues to help, as they’ve checked the barn and the others are still in a... (full context)
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Gabriel doesn’t reply, and Bathsheba quickly adds that Troy wasn’t to blame. She doesn’t want him to say anything more... (full context)
Chapter 37
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...Boldwood does admit that he’s been out of sorts lately. Gabriel says he did think Bathsheba would marry him. Boldwood imagines he’s the parish joke: Gabriel hastens to deny it, but... (full context)
Chapter 38
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On a Saturday evening in October Bathsheba is returning from market up a steep turnpike road. Troy is walking beside her. He’s... (full context)
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Troy says Bathsheba has lost all her former pluck and spirit. She looks away indignantly but resolutely. A... (full context)
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Bathsheba exclaims and prepares to get down, but Troy orders her to walk the horse up,... (full context)
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...he’ll bring all the money he can, and get her lodging somewhere. Troy returns to Bathsheba, who asks if he knew the woman. He says boldly that he does, but only... (full context)
Chapter 40
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That same evening, Troy asks Bathsheba for 20 pounds, and her face sinks. First he says it’s for the races, but... (full context)
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Sighing, Bathsheba gives him the money. Troy looks at his watch and reflexively opens its back case,... (full context)
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Troy tells Bathsheba not to be jealous, driving her almost to tears. She cries that he’s cruel to... (full context)
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Bathsheba begs Troy for honesty, but he snaps at her to not be so desperate, and... (full context)
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The next morning Bathsheba walks across the farm. She thinks of Gabriel, who is now like a brother to... (full context)
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Suddenly, Bathsheba asks if Fanny walked on the turnpike road: she did, Poorgrass says, before remarking that... (full context)
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Going inside, Bathsheba asks Liddy what the color of Fanny Robbin’s hair was—it was beautiful golden hair, she... (full context)
Chapter 41
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...in chalk and covers it with a black cloth. Poorgrass places flowers around it, as Bathsheba has requested, and turns back as mist covers the fields and the autumn fogs arrive. (full context)
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...for the bell and grave: Poorgrass says the parish pays for the grave alone, though Bathsheba will probably pay for everything. (full context)
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Ill at ease, Gabriel goes to ask Bathsheba what she’d prefer. She’s in a strange, perplexed mood: at first she says it’s fine... (full context)
Chapter 42
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Bathsheba bids Liddy goodnight, saying she doesn’t need her any more, though Liddy offers to remain... (full context)
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Bathsheba is no lonelier now than before her marriage, but her loneliness is different. A strange... (full context)
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...saying hesitatingly that Mary-ann has heard a rumor: that there’s two people in the coffin. Bathsheba trembles and says that’s not written on the cover. Others don’t believe it either, Liddy... (full context)
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Bathsheba wearily gazes into the fire for hours. She can imagine a connection between herself and... (full context)
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Bathsheba walks to Gabriel’s cottage, where he now lives alone. There’s a light on: Gabriel is... (full context)
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Bathsheba pauses in the hall and wishes aloud that Fanny could tell her her secret. After... (full context)
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Then Bathsheba returns to reality, and begins to weep. This is the one act that transformed Fanny’s... (full context)
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Recalling Gabriel’s figure, Bathsheba too kneels to pray. In a kind of atonement, she takes flowers from a vase... (full context)
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At that sight, Bathsheba springs towards him, embracing him and begging him to kiss her too. Troy looks at... (full context)
Chapter 43
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Bathsheba pays no attention to where she’s going. She passes a thicket with Gabriel and beech... (full context)
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...memorize a prayer by repeating it over and over: a small bit of amusement amid Bathsheba’s tragedy. Now she is anxious, hungry and thirsty. But suddenly she sees Liddy come along... (full context)
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Bathsheba first wonders if she might never go home again. Then, though, she tells Liddy that... (full context)
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Bathsheba watches, at six in the evening, the young village men gather for a game of... (full context)
Chapter 44
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After Bathsheba ran out, Troy had thrown himself on the bed and waited, miserable, for the morning.... (full context)
Chapter 45
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Meanwhile Bathsheba remains in the attic with Liddy, and sleeps restlessly. At eight a.m. Liddy knocks and... (full context)
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After breakfast Bathsheba leaves to walk towards church. Across the churchyard she sees Gabriel, who is looking at... (full context)
Chapter 46
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...long it will be: six months. He decides to accept, thinking grimly that he’s doing Bathsheba a favor. As night falls, the boat rides towards the port. (full context)
Chapter 47
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Bathsheba feels slightly surprised, then relieved, though mostly indifferent, at Troy’s absence. Her youthful pride has... (full context)
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...she hears one man ask another for help finding Mrs. Troy: her husband has drowned. Bathsheba gasps, then faints. Boldwood, who’s been watching, caches her. As they hear that a coast... (full context)
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Boldwood gathers his senses, still thinking of the feeling of Bathsheba in his arms. He offers to get her a driver, but she declines, and once... (full context)
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On Monday, though, Bathsheba’s conviction begins to be shaken: the newspaper contains the testimony of a young man from... (full context)
Chapter 48
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As winter goes on, Bathsheba reaches a mood of calm, though not peace: she feels pain that Troy is not... (full context)
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...for Gabriel and suggests he take over supervision of his farm as well. At first Bathsheba objects, though languidly, that it’s too much, but Boldwood insists. Gabriel grows wealthier and more... (full context)
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Boldwood, meanwhile, has begun to nourish a renewed hope regarding Bathsheba, who has now been persuaded to wear mourning clothes. He hopes she might be chastened... (full context)
Chapter 49
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...the Greenhill Fair takes place, the annual sheep fair that draws crowds from far away. Bathsheba’s and Boldwood’s flocks require a great deal of attention to make it there, though Weatherbury... (full context)
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...going home because of the unpleasantness that would await him—not to mention his responsibility for Bathsheba should the farm fail. (full context)
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Now Bathsheba too is curious to see Turpin, the grandest show in the fair. As she waits... (full context)
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...He realizes she’s bound to recognize his voice, and feels entirely unprepared, especially now that Bathsheba looks so charming and powerful. He also now feels a new shame at her finding... (full context)
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Troy dips into the refreshment tent, where he cannot see Pennyways, though he can see Bathsheba at the other end. He goes around the back and listens: she’s talking to a... (full context)
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Bathsheba thanks Boldwood for her cup of tea, and she insists on paying for it herself.... (full context)
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Boldwood offers to destroy the note, but Bathsheba says carelessly that it would be unjust not to read it, though it can’t be... (full context)
Chapter 50
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Since Poorgrass is now suffering from his ‘multiplying eye,’ and Gabriel is busy, Bathsheba accepts Boldwood’s offer to ride aside her as she drives home herself. She’d rather have... (full context)
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Suddenly, Boldwood asks if Bathsheba will marry again some day. She says she hasn’t thought of it, and indeed she’s... (full context)
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Boldwood asks if Bathsheba likes or respects him. She says it’s difficult to define her feelings in a language... (full context)
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...She finally is persuaded to think about it until Christmas, and give her answer then. Bathsheba feels coerced by a force stronger than her own will. (full context)
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One day Bathsheba is working with Gabriel and mentions Boldwood: Gabriel says he’ll never forget her. Suddenly Bathsheba... (full context)
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Bathsheba says the scheme is absurd, and asks if it wouldn’t be immoral. What stops it... (full context)
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Gabriel says it depends whether Bathsheba really thinks, like everyone else, that Troy is dead: she says she’s long ceased to... (full context)
Chapter 51
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Bathsheba is dressing in her room, and asks Liddy to stay with her: she feels agitated,... (full context)
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...cynical recently. Boldwood hopes that he might be able to expect a positive answer from Bathsheba, and that they might be married, now in five years and nine months. Gabriel reminds... (full context)
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Pennyways also hasn’t been able to learn whether there’s anything really between Bathsheba and Boldwood. She’s not fond of him, though, he thinks. Troy says she’s a handsome... (full context)
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Bathsheba asks Liddy how she looks, and Liddy flatters her: Bathsheba worries that people will think... (full context)
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...wants to increase the proportion, so that he can retire altogether eventually. If he marries Bathsheba, he adds—but Gabriel interrupts him and says not to speak of it yet. Boldwood says... (full context)
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...go to the party. Pennyways asks why he doesn’t bide his time and write to Bathsheba, but Troy says he shouldn’t have to wait to reclaim what’s his. The bailiff thinks... (full context)
Chapter 52
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...arrives, and says they should keep quiet, as if it’s false it will unnecessarily worry Bathsheba, and if it’s true it won’t do any good to tell her in advance. She’s... (full context)
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...they can hear him speaking softly to himself, hoping to God that she’ll come. Suddenly Bathsheba does arrive, and he welcomes her as she apologizes for being late. As they go... (full context)
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...in, listening to Gabriel and the maltster talking about Boldwood’s party and his love of Bathsheba. The men withdraw back to the house, and decide someone should alert Bathsheba. It’s decided... (full context)
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Inside, Bathsheba has resolved not to dance or sing, though it would have been unkind not to... (full context)
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...promise marriage after six years: he deserves it, for loving her more than anyone. Sobbing, Bathsheba asks him not to press her more if she agrees: he says yes, he’ll leave... (full context)
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...asks what’s wrong, and orders Samway to tell him. Samway tells Tall he should alert Bathsheba now. Boldwood asks Bathsheba if she knows what they mean: she doesn’t. Then, a man... (full context)
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...face: he begins to laugh mechanically, and Boldwood finally does recognize him. Troy turns to Bathsheba, who has sunk to the lowest stair, her eyes fixed vacantly on him, and says... (full context)
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At first Bathsheba doesn’t move; when Troy repeats his order, Boldwood tells her to go with her husband.... (full context)
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...into the ceiling. Boldwood gasps that there’s another way for him to die. He kisses Bathsheba’s hand, then opens the door and leaves. (full context)
Chapter 53
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...house, where all the women are huddled against the walls like sheep in a storm. Bathsheba is sitting beside Troy’s body, his head in her lap, clasping one of his hands:... (full context)
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The surgeon, Mr. Granthead, meets Liddy as he reaches the house. She tells him that Bathsheba locked herself in the room with Troy, wanting to know only when Gabriel or Mr.... (full context)
Chapter 54
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All knew that Boldwood was in strange moods that fall, but few other than Bathsheba and Troy suspected his full mental state. In his closet had been discovered several expensive... (full context)
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Bathsheba is at home, and keeps asking for news, but Gabriel decides not to bother her... (full context)
Chapter 55
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With the spring, Bathsheba begins to recover, though she continues to prefer solitude. She does spend more time outside... (full context)
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Bathsheba listens to the hymn from inside, where the choir is practicing. It’s a somber one,... (full context)
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Gabriel doesn’t want to drive Bathsheba away: he thinks he won’t go in tonight. They stand, embarrassed, and finally he says... (full context)
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Bathsheba cries that she can’t do without Gabriel, who has been with her for so long:... (full context)
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The next day Bathsheba receives a formal letter from Gabriel saying he will be gone by Lady Day. She... (full context)
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After dinner, Bathsheba goes down to Gabriel’s house and asks to speak with him. Awkwardly, he says he... (full context)
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Gabriel adds that he would continue to watch over Bathsheba’s farm, were it not for what’s being said about them. Bathsheba says he must tell... (full context)
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Gabriel looks into Bathsheba’s face, with tender surprise, and says if he only knew whether he might marry her... (full context)
Chapter 56
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Bathsheba tells Gabriel that she wants only a private, secret, plain wedding. A few nights later,... (full context)
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Bathsheba, meanwhile, can’t sleep past four, and finally fetches Liddy at six to give her hair... (full context)
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That evening the couple sits down to tea in Bathsheba’s parlor, where they’ve decided to live. Just then they hear a cannon and trumpets: they... (full context)