Great Expectations

Great Expectations

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Great Expectations Book 2, Chapter 26 Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
That morning, Mr. Jaggers invites Pip along with Drummle, Startop, and Herbert to dinner the next day. Mr. Jaggers house is dark and serious. Throughout the visit, Mr. Jaggers is most interested in Drummle, whom he calls "one of the true sort," although he advises Pip to steer clear of him. During the lavish dinner, Pip notices that Mr. Jaggers "wrenched the weakest parts of our dispositions out of us," inspiring the boys to bicker competitively about rowing and money. Pip notes that Drummle leaves Mr. Pocket's for good a month after this dinner.
Mr. Jaggers is fascinated by human traits that are the opposite of integrity and uprightness. Though he does not advise Pip to associate with the people who possess those negative traits, he is delighted to watch those people in action. This could explain his affinity for working with criminals.
Themes
Integrity and Reputation Theme Icon
Justice Theme Icon
Mr. Jaggers only servant is his housekeeper, Molly, whom Wemmick has urged Pip to take note of. She is a quiet, witch-like woman with streaming hair, completely submissive to Mr. Jaggers. Pip imagines her face above a cauldron. The adult Pip narrator alludes to a vision he will have of her face years later by fire in a dark room. When the boys bicker about who is strongest, Mr. Jaggers forces her to show the boys her wrists, which are scarred and disfigured and, Mr. Jaggers claims, the strongest he's ever seen.
Each boy wants to win the reputation for being strongest, but Molly wins it instead. Her scarred and disfigured wrists are evidence of some struggle in her past.
Themes
Integrity and Reputation Theme Icon