Great Expectations

Great Expectations

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Great Expectations Book 3, Chapter 44 Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
Pip goes to Satis House and explains to Miss Havisham and Estella that he has met his patron but doesn't say who it is. He asks Miss Havisham to confirm four things. 1. When Pip first began visiting her, she considered him a servant and had no larger designs for him. 2. It was simply a coincidence that Mr. Jaggers worked both for her and for Pip's patron. 3. When Pip assumed Miss Havisham was his patron, she led him on. 4. When Sarah Pocket, Georgiana, Camilla, and Raymond likewise assumed she was Pip's patron and resented Pip for it, she led them on in order to torment them. Miss Havisham confirms everything.
Though Pip was deluded in assuming Miss Havisham was his patron, she helped nurture his delusions by acting dishonestly and refusing to correct Pip's mistakes in order to get revenge on her own relatives' and their prying, jealous behavior. Pip is finally escaping from his own delusions, learning the truth of his past and, therefore, learning more about himself.
Themes
Integrity and Reputation Theme Icon
Justice Theme Icon
Pip tells Miss Havisham that Matthew and Herbert Pocket, unlike her other relations, are upright and kind. Pip asks her to believe in them. He also asks her to carry on the anonymous investments in Herbert's career that Pip can no longer afford to make. Miss Havisham does not respond.
Pip acts nobly and generously, defending Matthew and Herbert and requesting help for Herbert without hope of personal gain.
Themes
Integrity and Reputation Theme Icon
Generosity Theme Icon
Pip professes his love for Estella and explains he has long refrained from courting her directly because he assumed they were secretly betrothed. Estella replies that she is incapable of love, that warning Pip against loving her was the most she could do for him.
Since she is unable to love, the most generous and honest thing Estella could do was to warn Pip not to love her.
Themes
Integrity and Reputation Theme Icon
Generosity Theme Icon
When Pip confronts Estella about Drummle, she tells Pip she is going to marry Drummle. In despair, Pip begs her to marry someone worthier, someone who actually loves her—even though that person will not be himself, Pip says he would bear it for her sake. Estella is bewildered by Pip's plea, but calmly insists she will marry Drummle and assures Pip he'll get over her. Pip cries that he will never get over her, that she has always been and will always be a part of his very "existence." Miss Havisham watches Pip's outburst with her hand over her heart and a "ghastly stare of pity and remorse."
Pip's love for Estella is sincere. Estella's happiness is more important to him than his own. Miss Havisham has finally gotten the revenge she craved—she has seen a man as heartbroken for Estella as she was for Compeyson. But in finally achieving her goal, she feels only terrible sadness.
Themes
Justice Theme Icon
Generosity Theme Icon
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Utterly dejected, Pip walks all the way back to London to be alone. At the gate to his home, the porter gives him a note written in Wemmick's hand that tells him not to go home.
Wemmick's note implies that Pip is in danger.
Themes
Justice Theme Icon