Half of a Yellow Sun

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The novel’s first protagonist, a young Igbo boy from the small bush village of Opi. Ugwu becomes Odenigbo’s houseboy and initially marvels at all his possessions and education. Ugwu possesses a natural brilliance, and quickly excels at school and becomes an excellent cook. He goes through puberty and lusts after girls (and Olanna), but is usually frustrated in love. Ugwu is forcefully conscripted into the army and almost killed. While in the army he also kills enemy soldiers and participates in a gang rape of another Igbo women, an act he deeply regrets. He ends up writing The World Was Silent When We Died, the story of the Biafran conflict.

Ugwu Quotes in Half of a Yellow Sun

The Half of a Yellow Sun quotes below are all either spoken by Ugwu or refer to Ugwu. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Colonialism and Nigerian Politics Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Anchor Books edition of Half of a Yellow Sun published in 2006.
Part 1, Chapter 1 Quotes

“There are two answers to the things they will teach you about our land: the real answer and the answer you give in school to pass. You must read books and learn both answers. I will give you books, excellent books.” Master stopped to sip his tea. “They will teach you that a white man called Mungo Park discovered River Niger. That is rubbish. Our people fished in the Niger long before Mungo Park’s grandfather was born. But in your exam, write that it was Mungo Park.”

Related Characters: Odenigbo (speaker), Ugwu
Page Number: 13
Explanation and Analysis:

Ugwu, a thirteen-year-old boy from the village Opi, has been brought to Odenigbo's house to serve as his houseboy. In exchange, he is provided with room, board, and an education at the campus primary school.

In this quote, Odenigbo expresses his discontent with the colonial history that he knows Ugwu will be taught in school. He advises Ugwu as to what he must write to do well in school, but also wants to make sure that he passes on the true history of Nigeria, not the history that British colonialism has written into the textbooks. This quote epitomizes Odenigbo's frustration with postcolonial Nigeria: the true answers for an independent nation are very clear, but obscured by the shadow that remains of the imperial British empire. In order to succeed and maintain social mobility, one must pander to colonial enterprises; but to preserve any sort of native identity, one must also defy them.

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Part 1, Chapter 4 Quotes

Ugwu suddenly wished that Master would not touch his mother because her clothes smelled of age and must, and because Master did not know that her back ached and her cocoyam patch always yielded a poor harvest and her chest was indeed on fire when she coughed. What did Master know about anything anyway, since all he did was shout with his friends and drink brandy at night?

Related Characters: Ugwu (speaker), Odenigbo, Ugwu’s Mother
Page Number: 113-114
Explanation and Analysis:

Ugwu's aunt comes to Odenigbo's house to tell him that Ugwu's mother is very sick, and that he must go to see her immediately before she dies. Odenigbo tells Ugwu and his aunt to get in his car, and that he will bring Ugwu's mother from her village so that she can be treated by a doctor.

In this quote, Odenigbo insists on carrying Ugwu's mother to his car, and Ugwu suddenly feels both embarrassed and angry. Though he previously idolized Odenigbo for all of his worldly knowledge, he suddenly comes to realize Odenigbo's shortcomings: as an educated academic, Odenigbo assumes that he must know how most village Nigerians live. Ugwo feels that Odenigbo's kindness in ensuring that his mother receives modern medical help is a kind of pity, and not entirely altruistic. Ugwu does not know that Odenigbo himself comes from a village similar to Opi. This lack of transparency between Odenigbo about his past and Ugwu about his present reinforces the problems with class in postcolonial Nigeria, where social mobility is available to some and not others, and there is a severe disparity in the ways in which the poor and the rich live. Even though Ugwu and Odenigbo eventually become as good as family, they will always remain a Master and his servant. 

Part 3, Chapter 19 Quotes

Ugwu moved closer to the door to listen; he was fascinated by Rhodesia, by what was happening in the south of Africa. He could not comprehend people that looked like Mr. Richard taking away the things that belonged to people that looked like him, Ugwu, for no reason at all.

Related Characters: Ugwu (speaker), Richard Churchill
Page Number: 266
Explanation and Analysis:

Ugwu eavesdrops on Richard and Odenigbo in the living room in Nsukka, where Odenigbo is criticizing the British Empire for the atrocities that they commit in Rhodesia (South Africa). In this quote, Ugwu thinks to himself that it makes no sense that white people feel that they can simply take things away from black people. 

Ugwu's heartbreaking confusion at the racist roots of colonialism, that white people are superior to black people, underscores the nonsensical logic of racism and colonialism itself. Oppression and exploitation have occurred throughout human history, but nothing as systematic and large-scale as the European conquest of the African continent (not to mention Asia and the Americas). To Ugwu, the theft of property and freedom only comes as a punishment if people commit a crime; therefore, he is fascinated by the idea that one can rule over another simply due to differences in the color of their skin. His logic, of course, is absolutely correct: there is no reason that this should ever occur, except for the fact that centuries of racism and colonialism have put structures in place that allow for the systematic exploitation of black Africans by white Europeans. Ugwu's passing confusion underscores why Biafra's cause is so important, even in its failure: that Biafrans sought to create their own nation, free of colonial influence, exerting the innate human independence they deserved and were stripped of by the British. 

Part 4, Chapter 29 Quotes

The skinny soldiers – with no boots, no uniforms, no half of a yellow sun on their sleeves – kicked and slapped and mocked Ugwu during physical training… the casual cruelty of this new world in which he had no say grew a hard clot of fear inside him.

Related Characters: Ugwu (speaker)
Related Symbols: The Biafran Flag
Page Number: 450
Explanation and Analysis:

Like Olanna feared, Ugwu is forcibly conscripted into the Biafran army. In the army compound, Ugwu notes the "casual cruelty" he encounters during basic training, receiving brutal treatment from soldiers who don't seem to champion (or even acknowledge) any of the principles of Biafra that citizens hear over the radio. 

Ugwu is shocked to see that the soldiers who are supposedly fighting for their freedom are just as crude and uncivilized as the Northern "vandals" who systematically slaughter Biafrans. The lack of the half of the yellow sun on their shoulders, so unlike the smart-fitting uniform that Okeoma wears, is a symbolism of this lack of adherence to patriotism or ideals. As is often the case in war, idealism is sacrificed to violence, and brutal men assume power, taking advantage of strife and fear. The sun is a symbol of a hopeful future, and in its absence, there is seemingly no hope left. Ugwu has been treated well thus far in his life--save a few mean cries of "Ignoramus!" from Odenigbo--and he is surprised at how casually he is treated cruelly by his fellow soldiers. The unorganized, internally crude nature of the army does not bode well for the war effort, and it places Ugwu's kindness and innocence on dangerous grounds. 

Part 4, Chapter 32 Quotes

Ugwu thanked him and shook his head and realized that he would never be able to capture that child on paper, never be able to describe well enough the fear that dulled the eyes of mothers in the refugee camp when the bomber planes charged out of the sky. He would never be able to depict the very bleakness of bombing hungry people. But he tried, and the more he wrote the less he dreamed.

Related Characters: Ugwu (speaker)
Page Number: 498
Explanation and Analysis:

While Ugwu is healing from his battle wounds and trauma, he helps out in the refugee camp, where he encounters more suffering than ever before. Haunted by nightmares, he begins to write of the atrocities he has seen, which lessens his night terrors. 

Like Richard, Ugwu realizes the solace that writing can bring by easing things stuck into the mind onto the page. Ugwu knows that there are no words to truly describe what he has seen and experienced, but he continues to try, and the more he writes the more his pain is lessened. Here, Adichie parallels her own writing, and accounts of the war included in the novel, to show that writing of the Biafran war is perhaps more important to its writers than it is to its readers--memoirs are a way to lessen suffering by putting them down on the page, a way to share the burden of the pain, to make sure that there is always a memory of what happened, even when everyone who was involved has passed away. Ugwu's reasons for writing are in direct contrast to Richard's however: Ugwu writes for himself, whereas Richard's novel is meant for a wider audience. The irony is, however, that the story we get snippets of throughout the novel is actually written by Ugwu, not Richard--as Richard eventually concedes to Ugwu, it was never his story to tell. 

When they listened to Radio Biafra, Ugwu would get up and walk away. The shabby theatrics of the war reports, the voice that forced morsels of invented hope down people’s throats, did not interest him. One afternoon, Harrison came up to the flame tree carrying the radio turned up high to Radio Biafra.
“Please turn that thing off,” Ugwu said. He was watching some little boys playing on the nearby patch of grass. “I want to hear the birds.”
“There are no birds singing,” Harrison said.
“Turn it off.”
“His Excellency is about to give a speech… It will be a great speech.”
“There is no such thing as greatness,” Ugwu said.

Related Characters: Ugwu (speaker), Harrison (speaker), Colonel Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu
Page Number: 500
Explanation and Analysis:

After Ugwu returns from the war, he usually walks away when Harrison insists on listening to the propaganda and platitudes broadcasted over the radio. In this quote, he insists, instead, that Harrison turn it off, saying that there is "no such thing as greatness." This is a brutally, tragically poignant statement, and in the context of Ugwu's experiences, one of the most powerful of the novel.

The war leaves Ugwu shell-shocked, and it is likely that he has PTSD, as evidenced by his nightmares. After seeing the cruelty of the armies on both sides of the war, and performing cruel acts himself (notably the rape of the bar girl), he no longer believes as fervently in the Biafran cause, or in any kind of ideal, as he had before he was placed on its front lines. He has been hardened by the "casual cruelty" and gang rapes he experienced, and is angered by the lies he hears over the radio. Ugwu no longer believes that "His Excellency" is so excellent if he continues to let the atrocities carry on with no end in sight. Ugwu, previously the voice of youth and innocence, has now lost much of his faith in humanity, or in any kind of meaning in life itself.

Part 4, Chapter 34 Quotes

Ugwu was writing as she spoke, and his writing, the earnestness of his interest, suddenly made her story important, made it serve a larger purpose that even she was not sure of, and so she told him all she remembered about the train full of people who had cried and shouted and urinated on themselves.

Related Characters: Olanna Ozobia (speaker), Ugwu
Page Number: 512
Explanation and Analysis:

One day, while gently brushing Baby's hair, which is falling out from malnutrition, Olanna tells Ugwu that she cannot stop thinking of the little girl's head that she saw in the calabash on the way back from Kano. Ugwu asks her to say more, and writes down everything Olanna tells him. 

Like Ugwu's decreased nightmares after he began writing, Olanna begins to feel a sense of relief as she tells Ugwu all she saw that day in Kano and on the train back to Nsukka. The reader begins to suspect that perhaps the writer of "The World Was Silent When We Died" is not Richard, but in fact Ugwu. Ugwu's determination to record the atrocities Olanna has experienced, and the sense of release and understanding she feels, underscores the importance of recording these events for posterity, and of ensuring that events like these never happen again. It also emphasizes the tragedy of the neglect that Biafra felt from the world at large throughout the war--like Olanna's wish to be heard, Biafra wants to be heard and helped as people starve to death behind enemy lines, cut off from all food supplies. Here, Adichie shows the importance of narratives and memoir to give humanity to even the most gruesome of genocides. 

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Ugwu Character Timeline in Half of a Yellow Sun

The timeline below shows where the character Ugwu appears in Half of a Yellow Sun. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 1, Chapter 1
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Ugwu, a thirteen-year-old Igbo boy from the bush village of Opi, comes to the university town... (full context)
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Ugwu and his Aunty come to Odenigbo’s house, which is large and filled with books. Odenigbo... (full context)
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Odenigbo goes out and Ugwu explores the house, marveling at everything. He imagines what would be happening at his village,... (full context)
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Odenigbo wakes Ugwu up and says that the room smells like chicken. Ugwu sheepishly takes the meat out... (full context)
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Odenigbo says that Ugwu will be the oldest in his class, so he will have to prove himself the... (full context)
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Ugwu says that he can cook, and so Odenigbo has him write down ingredients he needs.... (full context)
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Ugwu is horrified, and convinced that “evil spirits” made him iron the socks. He worries that... (full context)
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Ugwu starts to realize that he has a much better situation with Odenigbo than most houseboys... (full context)
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Ugwu eavesdrops on them arguing one night as they discuss pan-Africanism and tribalism, and the fact... (full context)
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...four months Odenigbo says that a “special woman” is coming to visit from London, so Ugwu should clean the house. Ugwu is apprehensive about a new woman, but when she arrives... (full context)
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Ugwu learns that Olanna will be moving to Nsukka to live with Odenigbo soon. He is... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 2
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...at the house and adjust while Odenigbo is away. She changes some things that disturb Ugwu, like switching the fake flowers at the table for real ones from the yard. She... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 4
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The narrative returns to Ugwu. Ugwu clears up after Odenigbo and his guests have lunch, and he sucks on the... (full context)
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Ugwu has been amused by Richard lately, as Richard has been asking him questions about his... (full context)
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Odenigbo scoffs at Aunty’s description of Ugwu’s mother’s illness, and he offers to drive both Aunty and Ugwu to the village, pick... (full context)
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Odenigbo follows Ugwu into his hut to see his mother. Ugwu is suddenly reluctant to have Odenigbo touch... (full context)
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After a while Olanna comes into the kitchen and tells Ugwu that his mother had an infection, but she should be fine now. The next day... (full context)
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On the day Odenigbo’s mother will arrive Ugwu is cooking peppery rice. Jomo compliments the smell and then complains about Harrison. Ugwu always... (full context)
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Ugwu is very irritated but he decides to just agree with Odenigbo’s mother to make her... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 5
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When Odenigbo’s mother leaves, Olanna moves back into his house. Ugwu is concerned, as he saw a black cat near the house, and he warns Olanna... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 7
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The narrative follows Ugwu now, and a few years have passed. Ugwu is visiting his family at their village... (full context)
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Ugwu hasn’t seen Nnesinachi in four years, but he recognizes her immediately. She hugs him and... (full context)
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Ugwu returns to Nsukka. Odenigbo and Olanna are there, and they have a baby they call... (full context)
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...people proud to call themselves Nigerians. After the announcement Baby calls for “Mummy Ola” and Ugwu tickles her. (full context)
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...a “vision,” even though another (American) guest accuses the Major of being a communist. Meanwhile Ugwu remembers a quarrel from months before, some vague turmoil that resulted in Richard not coming... (full context)
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Olanna is the only one not excited about the deaths of the politicians, and Ugwu thinks about how “politicians” are like a lower form of life. That night Chinyere knocks... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 10
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The narrative now follows Ugwu, and a few weeks have passed since the second coup. Odenigbo and his guests no... (full context)
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Meanwhile Baby laughs and tells Ugwu that she saw baby chickens in her dreams, and she asks about “Mummy Ola.” Then... (full context)
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...people should bring whatever food they have to spare to the railway stations. Odenigbo sends Ugwu to the station with some tea and bread. (full context)
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Ugwu arrives at the railway station and sees people covered in dirt and blood. He hands... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 13
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Later Ugwu brings Olanna some food, and Odenigbo brings her a petition to sign – the university... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 15
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The story returns to Ugwu, who is with Odenigbo delivering food for refugees. The man at the office says that... (full context)
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Ugwu then hears Okeoma reciting one of his poems, “If the sun refuses to rise, we... (full context)
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...but the men are not allowed to leave so as not to start a panic. Ugwu’s Aunty arrives and says that Anulika will be married soon. She wants to do it... (full context)
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One day Olanna and Ugwu are cooking, and Olanna talks about how there have been “reprisal killings” of Northern soldiers... (full context)
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Olanna, Odenigbo, and Ugwu hurriedly gather up their precious possessions and leave with Baby. Biafran soldiers at the town... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 18
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...arriving in Abba, and Odenigbo decides to move the family to Umuahia ahead of schedule. Ugwu wonders why Odenigbo and Olanna are being so distant with each other. As they are... (full context)
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...house in Umuahia will be “perfectly normal,” but it seems like a dirty shack to Ugwu. Olanna says they should be grateful, as most refugees have far less. She tells Ugwu... (full context)
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Ugwu hears reports of the glorious Biafran army defeating the enemy, and he longs to be... (full context)
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Ugwu goes outside and sees some little boys in the Biafran Boys Brigade pretending to be... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 19
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The narrative returns to where it left off in Part One. Ugwu is talking with Harrison and trying to butter him up to ask about getting tear... (full context)
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Jomo laughs at Ugwu when he hears what the tear gas is for. Jomo says to just wait until... (full context)
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Ugwu and Richard drive back to Nsukka, and Ugwu is surprised to find Odenigbo’s mother and... (full context)
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Ugwu watches Mama (Odenigbo’s mother) put a packet of spices into Odenigbo’s soup, and he grows... (full context)
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The next evening Ugwu finds a mass of flies in the sink, which he knows is the sign of... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 20
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Olanna returns to Nsukka and Ugwu greets her. Odenigbo’s mother is still there, but is about to leave. Olanna notices something... (full context)
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Olanna returns to Odenigbo’s house and packs all her things up. Ugwu tries to portray Odenigbo sympathetically, but Olanna feels that Ugwu has betrayed her as well... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 22
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Ugwu gets diarrhea because he is so stressed about Odenigbo and Olanna’s relationship. Mama returns with... (full context)
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The next day Ugwu finds Amala in the garden, eating all the hot peppers. She is crying, and she... (full context)
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...she gets angry when Odenigbo again tries to put all the blame on his mother. Ugwu is so anxious about their argument that he gets sick again, and when he returns... (full context)
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Ugwu goes inside and eavesdrops. He hears shouting, but then he hears Odenigbo and Olanna having... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 23
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Olanna brings the baby home, and tells Odenigbo about Ugwu’s belief in Mama’s medicine. Odenigbo says it is no more irrational than Christianity. Olanna affirms... (full context)
Part 4, Chapter 25
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Olanna makes Ugwu guard Baby all the time, as she heard a story about soldiers kidnapping children to... (full context)
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...Olanna fears she will die soon. Mrs. Muokelu brings her some dried egg yolk, which Ugwu and Olanna think looks repulsive, but Baby eats all of it. (full context)
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...feels paranoid, and she wants the family to spend the whole day in the bunker. Ugwu tells her that Baby has lice, and Olanna angrily says it is from playing with... (full context)
Part 4, Chapter 26
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Ugwu hates the relief food, and he misses his old kitchen in Nsukka. Olanna is grateful... (full context)
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...West. Special Julius says the “vandals” have looted everything there and raped the women, and Ugwu shudders at the thought of Anulika or Nnesinachi beneath a “dirty sun-blackened Hausa soldier.” He... (full context)
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...camp. Olanna says she will start holding classes in her yard, and she asks if Ugwu will teach a class too. Ugwu asks if she thinks the vandals are in Opi,... (full context)
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...Olanna are home, so Ezeka leaves a note and goes. Eberechi, the neighbor girl whom Ugwu has been admiring, asks him about Ezeka and seems impressed that a “Big Man” was... (full context)
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Ugwu is nervous talking to Eberechi, and he agrees to work on the school roof with... (full context)
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...arm wanders about. Eberechi says that her brother is in the army. Then she and Ugwu part ways. (full context)
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Days later Ugwu sets up benches for the class he is supposed to teach. Olanna tells him he... (full context)
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...there are no real markets on the Biafran side. Many people have been doing this. Ugwu takes over her class while she is away. Sometimes Eberechi watches him teach, and Ugwu... (full context)
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Ugwu is angry that this happened, and he imagines having sex with Eberechi, and how he... (full context)
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...countries want to do so as well, but “America is the stumbling block” stopping them. Ugwu finds Eberechi and tells her the good news, and she pinches his neck, as is... (full context)
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...Nwogu is calling for her, and Eberechi excitedly goes to get ready. The soldier accuses Ugwu of idleness, but Ugwu says he is a teacher and is sponsored by the Director... (full context)
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Ugwu is heartbroken and depressed, and when Eberechi comes to see him that night his jealousy... (full context)
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Ugwu starts ignoring Eberechi, and he gets angry when she asks him what’s wrong. Eventually they... (full context)
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Odenigbo comes home and goes into his room with Olanna. Ugwu cooks Baby’s food, and then Olanna comes out and yells at him for using the... (full context)
Part 4, Chapter 28
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Odenigbo, Olanna, Ugwu, and Baby move into a single room, which is still lucky considering the refugee-filled town.... (full context)
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...home Olanna sees a boy being conscripted by soldiers, and then she gets angry at Ugwu for being outside. Olanna goes to their room and finds Odenigbo crying about his mother.... (full context)
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A few hours later Professor Ezeka’s driver arrives with supplies for Olanna and Odenigbo. Ugwu is overjoyed at all the food, but Olanna immediately puts some salt aside for Alice.... (full context)
Part 4, Chapter 29
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Ugwu is bored one afternoon and he ignores Olanna’s warnings and sets out on the road.... (full context)
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Ugwu’s hands are tied and he is made to walk down the road. He sees Mrs.... (full context)
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Olanna acts chilly towards Ugwu for a few days, until one morning Baby is crying because Olanna won’t buy her... (full context)
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While Olanna is away visiting Kainene, Ugwu overhears Odenigbo talking and laughing with Alice. The next day Odenigbo and Alice sit together... (full context)
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Ugwu thinks about the words “blown up” and then resolves to talk to Eberechi. He goes... (full context)
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Eberechi starts to come around more, and one day Ugwu finally kisses her. She kisses him back and lets him take off her underwear for... (full context)
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The soldiers throw Ugwu into a van with a teenager and a man in his sixties. The elderly man... (full context)
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...to find out the location of the enemy, and then they set up their “operation.” Ugwu corrects High-Tech’s pronunciation of “reconnaissance,” which seems to win his respect. (full context)
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When they reach the training camp – a former primary school – Ugwu’s head is roughly shaved and he is put through a “training” of beating and mockery.... (full context)
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Ugwu is told that the next operation will be soon, and he is both scared and... (full context)
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One day Ugwu finds the book Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave: Written by... (full context)
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High-Tech tells Ugwu that the Nigerians and Biafrans stopped fighting to celebrate Easter, and the two sides even... (full context)
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Ugwu’s first battle is at night, and he huddles in a wet trench. He buried his... (full context)
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Ugwu’s unit returns to camp and they all congratulate him, nicknaming him “Target Destroyer.” For a... (full context)
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...The bar girl says that they have no beer, so they drink the local gin. Ugwu is annoyed by his loud, boastful fellow soldiers. High-Tech starts to roll a cigarette and... (full context)
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Ugwu goes out to urinate and pretends he is back in the yard in Nsukka. He... (full context)
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The war continues, and Ugwu has more “operations” in the trenches. Sometimes his fear overcomes him, and he can only... (full context)
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...be visiting. A convoy of cars and officers drive past, and the soldiers all salute. Ugwu has no interest in Ojukwo or in any of the corrupt, arrogant commanders. There is... (full context)
Part 4, Chapter 31
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Olanna becomes desperate with worry about Ugwu, and is always fearing to see his body somewhere. She gets an old package from... (full context)
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...When she gets home there is an army jeep outside, and Kainene tells her that Ugwu has died. Olanna can only say “no” and shake her head. Kainene says that Madu... (full context)
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...immediately goes to the bar, pours Odenigbo’s drink onto the floor, and tells him that Ugwu has died. She yells and runs away when the bar owner comes to hug her.... (full context)
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The people in the building sing for Ugwu in the yard, and Alice brings out her piano. Olanna is repulsed by Odenigbo’s presence,... (full context)
Part 4, Chapter 32
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The narrative returns to Ugwu, who is badly wounded but alive. Some soldiers carry him to a hospital, and he... (full context)
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A few days later Richard comes for Ugwu and takes him away in his car. Ugwu’s wounds are exacerbated by the bumpy car,... (full context)
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Richard asks if Ugwu was afraid in the war. Ugwu answers that he found the Frederick Douglass book, and... (full context)
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When Ugwu comes home Olanna and Odenigbo hug him, which they have never done before. Ugwu starts... (full context)
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Ugwu relives his battle experiences over and over, along with the face of the bar girl.... (full context)
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As Ugwu heals he starts working at the refugee camp during the day and writing at night.... (full context)
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...the refugees before giving them food. Kainene throws him out, growing “magnificent in her rage.” Ugwu is ashamed and thinks that Kainene, Olanna, and Eberechi would all hate him if they... (full context)
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At night Ugwu listens to Olanna and Kainene talk, creating “their own world” that Odenigbo and Richard can... (full context)
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One day Ojukwu is about to give a speech, but Ugwu tells Harrison to turn the radio off – he would rather hear the birds. Harrison... (full context)
Part 4, Chapter 33
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...farming.” Richard plays with Baby for a while, but Kainene still doesn’t return. Richard asks Ugwu about his writing, but Ugwu is shy about it. (full context)
Part 4, Chapter 34
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...didn’t leave in search of peace, but instead ran away. Olanna refuses to believe this. Ugwu comes in and Olanna tells him that she keeps thinking about the braided hair of... (full context)
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...into Nsukka and are stopped by a belligerent Nigerian officer. The officer makes Odenigbo and Ugwu get out of the car and carry wood, and he slaps Odenigbo for resisting. Then... (full context)
Part 4, Chapter 35
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Ugwu finds a pile of burned books in the yard of Odenigbo’s old house. Olanna and... (full context)
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Ugwu goes home to Opi and is greeted by his father’s second wife, and then the... (full context)
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Later Ugwu sits with Anulika, but she seems to have no wit or energy left. Ugwu wonders... (full context)
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Ugwu returns to Nsukka but doesn’t tell Olanna about Anulika. Olanna is still preoccupied with finding... (full context)
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Ugwu hears banging on the door and thinks that soldiers have come for Odenigbo, but it... (full context)
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One day Ugwu thinks Miss Adebayo is banging on the door, but then two soldiers burst in. They... (full context)
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Ugwu comes back to the kitchen and finds Richard reading his notes. Richard says that Ugwu's... (full context)
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Ugwu asks if Richard will ask about Eberechi when he is in Umuahia, and Richard says... (full context)
Part 4, Chapter 36
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...inside and tells him that Eberechi was killed by shelling. Richard decides not to tell Ugwu this, but to let him keep his dream until he finds out the truth on... (full context)
Part 4, Chapter 37
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...sister. The book ends with the dedication of The World Was Silent When We Died. Ugwu, the author, dedicates it to “Master, my good man.” (full context)