Hedda Gabler

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Mademoiselle Diana Character Analysis

Named for a Greek goddess of hunting and (ironically) chastity, Mademoiselle Diana is a redheaded singer and the madam, or procuress, of a brothel in town. She never appears onstage. During his wild drunken debauched days, Ejlert Lövborg was an ardent champion of hers. During the action of the play, however, after accusing Mademoiselle or one of her prostitutes of robbing him of his manuscript, Lövborg causes a fight to break out in her salon. Hedda seems to be vaguely jealous of Mademoiselle Diana’s prominence in Lövborg’s sex life.
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Mademoiselle Diana Character Timeline in Hedda Gabler

The timeline below shows where the character Mademoiselle Diana appears in Hedda Gabler. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Act 1
Power and Influence Theme Icon
Marriage, Love, Sexuality, and Jealousy Theme Icon
...parted. She thinks it must be a red-haired singer here in town (later identified as Mademoiselle Diana ). (full context)
Act 3
Power and Influence Theme Icon
Marriage, Love, Sexuality, and Jealousy Theme Icon
...reveals that a few of his guests, including the madly drunk Lövborg, went to one Mademoiselle Diana ’s salon last night—that is, the brothel run by the red-haired Mademoiselle Diana. Lövborg was... (full context)
Power and Influence Theme Icon
Provincialism and Patriarchy Theme Icon
Modern Society v. the Individual Theme Icon
Marriage, Love, Sexuality, and Jealousy Theme Icon
Beauty, Tragedy, and Farce Theme Icon
Things went badly at Mademoiselle Diana ’s last night, however. Lövborg accused either the madam herself or one of the prostitutes... (full context)
Act 4
Provincialism and Patriarchy Theme Icon
Modern Society v. the Individual Theme Icon
Beauty, Tragedy, and Farce Theme Icon
...Lövborg is already dead. Moreover, Lövborg shot himself not at his lodgings, but rather at Mademoiselle Diana ’s salon, while attempting to recover “a child that had been lost.” Brack assumed this... (full context)
Power and Influence Theme Icon
Marriage, Love, Sexuality, and Jealousy Theme Icon
Beauty, Tragedy, and Farce Theme Icon
...afraid of. Furthermore, the great Hedda Gabler will have to share the witness box with Mademoiselle Diana . (full context)