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Chapter 1 Quotes

You have no business to take our books; you are a dependant, mama says; you have no money; your father left you none; you ought to beg, and not to live here with gentlemen's children like us.
Location: Chapter 1
Speaker: John Reed
Mentioned or related: Jane Eyre
 

Chapter 2 Quotes

Returning, I had to cross before the looking-glass; my fascinated glance involuntarily explored the depth it revealed. All looked colder and darker in that visionary hollow than in reality: … the strange little figure there gazing at me, with a white face and arms specking the gloom, and glittering eyes of fear moving where all else was still, had the effect of a real spirit.
Location: Chapter 2
Speaker: Jane Eyre
 

Chapter 3 Quotes

I shook my head: I could not see how poor people had the means of being kind; and then to learn to speak like them, to adopt their manners, to be uneducated, to grow up like one of the poor women I saw sometimes nursing their children or washing their clothes at the cottage doors of the village of Gateshead: no, I was not heroic enough to purchase liberty at the price of caste.
Location: Chapter 3
Speaker: Jane Eyre
 

Chapter 4 Quotes

Ere I had finished this reply, my soul began to expand, to exult, with the strangest sense of freedom, of triumph, I ever felt. It seemed as if an invisible bond had burst, and that I had struggled out into unhoped-for liberty.
Location: Chapter 4
Speaker: Jane Eyre
 

Chapter 6 Quotes

I hold another creed: … it makes Eternity a rest—a mighty home, not a terror and an abyss. … with this creed revenge never worries my heart, degradation never too deeply disgusts me, injustice never crushes me too low: I live in calm, looking to the end.
Location: Chapter 6
Speaker: Helen Burns
 

Chapter 8 Quotes

I resolved, in the depth of my heart, that I would be most moderate … I told her all the story of my sad childhood. Exhausted by emotion, my language was more subdued than it generally was when it developed that sad theme; and mindful of Helen's warnings against the indulgence of resentment, I infused into the narrative far less of gall and wormwood than ordinary. Thus restrained and simplified, it sounded more credible: I felt as I went on that Miss Temple fully believed me.
Location: Chapter 8
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Maria Temple, Helen Burns
 
The refreshing meal, the brilliant fire, the presence and kindness of her beloved instructress, or, perhaps, more than all these, something in her own unique mind, had roused her powers within her … [Helen] suddenly acquired a beauty more singular than that of Miss Temple's—a beauty neither of fine color nor long eyelash, nor pencilled brow, but of meaning, of movement, of radiance.
Location: Chapter 8
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Maria Temple, Helen Burns
 

Chapter 10 Quotes

I tired of the routine of eight years in one afternoon. I desired liberty; for liberty I gasped; for liberty I uttered a prayer; it seemed scattered on the wind then faintly blowing. I abandoned it and framed a humbler supplication; for change, stimulus: that petition, too, seemed swept off into vague space: "Then," I cried, half desperate, "grant me at least a new servitude!"
Location: Chapter 10
Speaker: Jane Eyre
 

Chapter 11 Quotes

While I paced softly on, the last sound I expected to hear in so still a region, a laugh, struck my ear. It was a curious laugh; distinct, formal, mirthless. I stopped: the sound ceased, only for an instant; it began again, louder: for at first, though distinct, it was very low. It passed off in a clamorous peal that seemed to wake an echo in every lonely chamber; though it originated but in one, and I could have pointed out the door whence the accents issued.
Location: Chapter 11
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Bertha Mason
 

Chapter 12 Quotes

I climbed the three staircases, raised the trap-door of the attic, and having reached the leads, looked out afar over sequestered field and hill, and along dim sky-line—that then I longed for a power of vision which might overpass that limit; which might reach the busy world, towns, regions full of life I had heard of but never seen—that then I desired more of practical experience than I possessed; more of intercourse with my kind, of acquaintance with variety of character, than was here within my reach.
Location: Chapter 12
Speaker: Jane Eyre
 
It is in vain to say human beings ought to be satisfied with tranquillity: they must have action; and they will make it if they cannot find it. Millions are condemned to a stiller doom than mine, and millions are in silent revolt against their lot. Nobody knows how many rebellions besides political rebellions ferment in the masses of life which people earth. Women are supposed to be very calm generally: but women feel just as men feel; they need exercise for their faculties, and a field for their efforts, as much as their brothers do … It is thoughtless to condemn them, or laugh at them, if they seek to do more or learn more than custom has pronounced necessary for their sex.
Location: Chapter 12
Speaker: Jane Eyre
 

Chapter 13 Quotes

I knew my traveller with his broad and jetty eyebrows; his square forehead, made squarer by the horizontal sweep of his black hair. I recognized his decisive nose, more remarkable for character than beauty; his full nostrils, denoting, I thought, choler; his grim mouth, chin, and jaw—yes, all three were very grim, and no mistake.
Location: Chapter 13
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
 

Chapter 14 Quotes

I don't think, sir, you have a right to command me, merely because you are older than I, or because you have seen more of the world than I have; your claim to superiority depends on the use you have made of your time and experience.
Location: Chapter 14
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
 

Chapter 17 Quotes

"He is not to them what he is to me," I thought: "he is not of their kind. I believe he is of mine;—I am sure he is—I feel akin to him—I understand the language of his countenance and movements: though rank and wealth sever us widely, I have something in my brain and heart, in my blood and nerves, that assimilates me mentally to him … I must, then, repeat continually that we are for ever sundered:—and yet, while I breathe and think, I must love him."
Location: Chapter 17
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
 

Chapter 18 Quotes

I saw he was going to marry her, for family, perhaps political reasons, because her rank and connections suited him; I felt he had not given her his love, and that her qualifications were ill adapted to win from him that treasure. This was the point—this was where the nerve was touched and teased—this was where the fever was sustained and fed: she could not charm him.
Location: Chapter 18
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester, Blanche Ingram
 

Chapter 20 Quotes

What crime was this that lived incarnate in this sequestered mansion, and could neither be expelled nor subdued by the owner?—what mystery, that broke out now in fire and now in blood, at the deadest hours of night? What creature was it, that, masked in an ordinary woman's face and shape, uttered the voice, now of a mocking demon, and anon of a carrion-seeking bird of prey?
Location: Chapter 20
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Bertha Mason
 

Chapter 21 Quotes

Presentiments are strange things! and so are sympathies; and so are signs; and the three combined make one mystery to which humanity has not yet found the key.
Location: Chapter 21
Speaker: Jane Eyre
 

Chapter 22 Quotes

I am strangely glad to get back again to you: and wherever you are is my home—my only home.
Location: Chapter 22
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
 

Chapter 23 Quotes

I sometimes have a queer feeling with regard to you—especially when you are near me, as now: it is as if I had a string somewhere under my left ribs, tightly and inextricably knotted to a similar string situated in the corresponding quarter of your little frame.
Location: Chapter 23
Mentioned or related: Jane Eyre
 

Chapter 24 Quotes

He stood between me and every thought of religion, as an eclipse intervenes between man and the broad sun. I could not, in those days, see God for His creature: of whom I had made an idol.
Location: Chapter 24
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
 

Chapter 25 Quotes

I faced the wreck of the chestnut-tree; it stood up black and riven: the trunk, split down the centre, gaped ghastly … their great boughs on each side were dead, and next winter's tempests would be sure to fell one or both to earth: as yet, however, they might be said to form one tree—a ruin, but an entire ruin.
Location: Chapter 25
Speaker: Jane Eyre
 

Chapter 26 Quotes

What it was, whether beast or human being, one could not, at first sight, tell: it grovelled, seemingly, on all fours; it snatched and growled like some strange wild animal: but it was covered with clothing, and a quantity of dark, grizzled hair, wild as a mane, hid its head and face.
Location: Chapter 26
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Bertha Mason
 

Chapter 27 Quotes

"Who in the world cares for you? Or who will be injured by what you do?" Still indomitable was the reply—"I care for myself. The more solitary, the more friendless, the more unsustained I am, the more I will respect myself. I will keep the law given by God; sanctioned by man.
Location: Chapter 27
Speaker: Jane Eyre
 

Chapter 28 Quotes

This was the climax. A pang of exquisite suffering—a throe of true despair—rent and heaved my heart. Worn out, indeed, I was; not another step could I stir. I sank on the wet doorstep: I groaned—I wrung my hands—I wept in utter anguish. Oh, this spectre of death! Oh, this last hour, approaching in such horror! Alas, this isolation—this banishment from my kind!
Location: Chapter 28
Speaker: Jane Eyre
 

Chapter 30 Quotes

There was a reviving pleasure in this intercourse, of a kind now tasted by me for the first time—the pleasure arising from perfect congeniality of tastes, sentiments, and principles.
Location: Chapter 30
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Diana and Mary Rivers
 

Chapter 32 Quotes

St. John, no doubt, would have given the world to follow, recall, retain her, when she thus left him; but he would not give one chance of heaven, nor relinquish, for the elysium of her love, one hope of the true, eternal Paradise.
Location: Chapter 32
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: St. John Rivers, Rosamond Oliver
 
Again the surprised expression crossed his face. He had not imagined that a woman would dare to speak so to a man. For me, I felt at home in this sort of discourse. I could never rest in communication with strong, discreet, and refined minds, whether male or female, till I had passed the outworks of conventional reserve, and crossed the threshold of confidence, and won a place by their heart's very hearthstone.
Location: Chapter 32
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: St. John Rivers
 

Chapter 33 Quotes

I looked at the blank wall: it seemed a sky thick with ascending stars,—every one lit me to a purpose or delight. Those who had saved my life, whom, till this hour, I had loved barrenly, I could now benefit. They were under a yoke,—I could free them: they were scattered,—I could reunite them: the independence, the affluence which was mine, might be theirs too.
Location: Chapter 33
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: St. John Rivers, Diana and Mary Rivers
 

Chapter 34 Quotes

I found him a very patient, very forbearing, and yet an exacting master … By degrees, he acquired a certain influence over me that took away my liberty of mind … But I did not love my servitude: I wished, many a time, he had continued to neglect me.
Location: Chapter 34
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: St. John Rivers
 

Chapter 35 Quotes

I broke from St. John, who had followed, and would have detained me. It was my time to assume ascendency. My powers were in play and in force … I mounted to my chamber; locked myself in; fell on my knees; and prayed in my way—a different way to St. John's, but effective in its own fashion.
Location: Chapter 35
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: St. John Rivers
 

Chapter 37 Quotes

I will be your neighbor, your nurse, your housekeeper. I find you lonely: I will be your companion—to read to you, to walk with you, to sit with you, to wait on you, to be eyes and hands to you. Cease to look so melancholy, my dear master; you shall not be left desolate, so long as I live.
Location: Chapter 37
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
 
Then he stretched his hand out to be led. I took that dear hand, held it a moment to my lips, then let it pass round my shoulder: being so much lower of stature than he, I served both for his prop and guide.
Location: Chapter 37
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
 

Chapter 38 Quotes

Reader, I married him.
Location: Chapter 38
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
 

Jane Eyre Quotes

You have no business to take our books; you are a dependant, mama says; you have no money; your father left you none; you ought to beg, and not to live here with gentlemen's children like us.
Location: Chapter 1
Speaker: John Reed
Mentioned or related: Jane Eyre
 
Returning, I had to cross before the looking-glass; my fascinated glance involuntarily explored the depth it revealed. All looked colder and darker in that visionary hollow than in reality: … the strange little figure there gazing at me, with a white face and arms specking the gloom, and glittering eyes of fear moving where all else was still, had the effect of a real spirit.
Location: Chapter 2
Speaker: Jane Eyre
 
I shook my head: I could not see how poor people had the means of being kind; and then to learn to speak like them, to adopt their manners, to be uneducated, to grow up like one of the poor women I saw sometimes nursing their children or washing their clothes at the cottage doors of the village of Gateshead: no, I was not heroic enough to purchase liberty at the price of caste.
Location: Chapter 3
Speaker: Jane Eyre
 
Ere I had finished this reply, my soul began to expand, to exult, with the strangest sense of freedom, of triumph, I ever felt. It seemed as if an invisible bond had burst, and that I had struggled out into unhoped-for liberty.
Location: Chapter 4
Speaker: Jane Eyre
 
The refreshing meal, the brilliant fire, the presence and kindness of her beloved instructress, or, perhaps, more than all these, something in her own unique mind, had roused her powers within her … [Helen] suddenly acquired a beauty more singular than that of Miss Temple's—a beauty neither of fine color nor long eyelash, nor pencilled brow, but of meaning, of movement, of radiance.
Location: Chapter 8
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Maria Temple, Helen Burns
 
I resolved, in the depth of my heart, that I would be most moderate … I told her all the story of my sad childhood. Exhausted by emotion, my language was more subdued than it generally was when it developed that sad theme; and mindful of Helen's warnings against the indulgence of resentment, I infused into the narrative far less of gall and wormwood than ordinary. Thus restrained and simplified, it sounded more credible: I felt as I went on that Miss Temple fully believed me.
Location: Chapter 8
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Maria Temple, Helen Burns
 
I tired of the routine of eight years in one afternoon. I desired liberty; for liberty I gasped; for liberty I uttered a prayer; it seemed scattered on the wind then faintly blowing. I abandoned it and framed a humbler supplication; for change, stimulus: that petition, too, seemed swept off into vague space: "Then," I cried, half desperate, "grant me at least a new servitude!"
Location: Chapter 10
Speaker: Jane Eyre
 
While I paced softly on, the last sound I expected to hear in so still a region, a laugh, struck my ear. It was a curious laugh; distinct, formal, mirthless. I stopped: the sound ceased, only for an instant; it began again, louder: for at first, though distinct, it was very low. It passed off in a clamorous peal that seemed to wake an echo in every lonely chamber; though it originated but in one, and I could have pointed out the door whence the accents issued.
Location: Chapter 11
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Bertha Mason
 
It is in vain to say human beings ought to be satisfied with tranquillity: they must have action; and they will make it if they cannot find it. Millions are condemned to a stiller doom than mine, and millions are in silent revolt against their lot. Nobody knows how many rebellions besides political rebellions ferment in the masses of life which people earth. Women are supposed to be very calm generally: but women feel just as men feel; they need exercise for their faculties, and a field for their efforts, as much as their brothers do … It is thoughtless to condemn them, or laugh at them, if they seek to do more or learn more than custom has pronounced necessary for their sex.
Location: Chapter 12
Speaker: Jane Eyre
 
I climbed the three staircases, raised the trap-door of the attic, and having reached the leads, looked out afar over sequestered field and hill, and along dim sky-line—that then I longed for a power of vision which might overpass that limit; which might reach the busy world, towns, regions full of life I had heard of but never seen—that then I desired more of practical experience than I possessed; more of intercourse with my kind, of acquaintance with variety of character, than was here within my reach.
Location: Chapter 12
Speaker: Jane Eyre
 
I knew my traveller with his broad and jetty eyebrows; his square forehead, made squarer by the horizontal sweep of his black hair. I recognized his decisive nose, more remarkable for character than beauty; his full nostrils, denoting, I thought, choler; his grim mouth, chin, and jaw—yes, all three were very grim, and no mistake.
Location: Chapter 13
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
 
I don't think, sir, you have a right to command me, merely because you are older than I, or because you have seen more of the world than I have; your claim to superiority depends on the use you have made of your time and experience.
Location: Chapter 14
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
 
"He is not to them what he is to me," I thought: "he is not of their kind. I believe he is of mine;—I am sure he is—I feel akin to him—I understand the language of his countenance and movements: though rank and wealth sever us widely, I have something in my brain and heart, in my blood and nerves, that assimilates me mentally to him … I must, then, repeat continually that we are for ever sundered:—and yet, while I breathe and think, I must love him."
Location: Chapter 17
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
 
I saw he was going to marry her, for family, perhaps political reasons, because her rank and connections suited him; I felt he had not given her his love, and that her qualifications were ill adapted to win from him that treasure. This was the point—this was where the nerve was touched and teased—this was where the fever was sustained and fed: she could not charm him.
Location: Chapter 18
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester, Blanche Ingram
 
What crime was this that lived incarnate in this sequestered mansion, and could neither be expelled nor subdued by the owner?—what mystery, that broke out now in fire and now in blood, at the deadest hours of night? What creature was it, that, masked in an ordinary woman's face and shape, uttered the voice, now of a mocking demon, and anon of a carrion-seeking bird of prey?
Location: Chapter 20
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Bertha Mason
 
Presentiments are strange things! and so are sympathies; and so are signs; and the three combined make one mystery to which humanity has not yet found the key.
Location: Chapter 21
Speaker: Jane Eyre
 
I am strangely glad to get back again to you: and wherever you are is my home—my only home.
Location: Chapter 22
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
 
I sometimes have a queer feeling with regard to you—especially when you are near me, as now: it is as if I had a string somewhere under my left ribs, tightly and inextricably knotted to a similar string situated in the corresponding quarter of your little frame.
Location: Chapter 23
Mentioned or related: Jane Eyre
 
He stood between me and every thought of religion, as an eclipse intervenes between man and the broad sun. I could not, in those days, see God for His creature: of whom I had made an idol.
Location: Chapter 24
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
 
I faced the wreck of the chestnut-tree; it stood up black and riven: the trunk, split down the centre, gaped ghastly … their great boughs on each side were dead, and next winter's tempests would be sure to fell one or both to earth: as yet, however, they might be said to form one tree—a ruin, but an entire ruin.
Location: Chapter 25
Speaker: Jane Eyre
 
What it was, whether beast or human being, one could not, at first sight, tell: it grovelled, seemingly, on all fours; it snatched and growled like some strange wild animal: but it was covered with clothing, and a quantity of dark, grizzled hair, wild as a mane, hid its head and face.
Location: Chapter 26
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Bertha Mason
 
"Who in the world cares for you? Or who will be injured by what you do?" Still indomitable was the reply—"I care for myself. The more solitary, the more friendless, the more unsustained I am, the more I will respect myself. I will keep the law given by God; sanctioned by man.
Location: Chapter 27
Speaker: Jane Eyre
 
This was the climax. A pang of exquisite suffering—a throe of true despair—rent and heaved my heart. Worn out, indeed, I was; not another step could I stir. I sank on the wet doorstep: I groaned—I wrung my hands—I wept in utter anguish. Oh, this spectre of death! Oh, this last hour, approaching in such horror! Alas, this isolation—this banishment from my kind!
Location: Chapter 28
Speaker: Jane Eyre
 
There was a reviving pleasure in this intercourse, of a kind now tasted by me for the first time—the pleasure arising from perfect congeniality of tastes, sentiments, and principles.
Location: Chapter 30
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Diana and Mary Rivers
 
Again the surprised expression crossed his face. He had not imagined that a woman would dare to speak so to a man. For me, I felt at home in this sort of discourse. I could never rest in communication with strong, discreet, and refined minds, whether male or female, till I had passed the outworks of conventional reserve, and crossed the threshold of confidence, and won a place by their heart's very hearthstone.
Location: Chapter 32
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: St. John Rivers
 
St. John, no doubt, would have given the world to follow, recall, retain her, when she thus left him; but he would not give one chance of heaven, nor relinquish, for the elysium of her love, one hope of the true, eternal Paradise.
Location: Chapter 32
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: St. John Rivers, Rosamond Oliver
 
I looked at the blank wall: it seemed a sky thick with ascending stars,—every one lit me to a purpose or delight. Those who had saved my life, whom, till this hour, I had loved barrenly, I could now benefit. They were under a yoke,—I could free them: they were scattered,—I could reunite them: the independence, the affluence which was mine, might be theirs too.
Location: Chapter 33
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: St. John Rivers, Diana and Mary Rivers
 
I found him a very patient, very forbearing, and yet an exacting master … By degrees, he acquired a certain influence over me that took away my liberty of mind … But I did not love my servitude: I wished, many a time, he had continued to neglect me.
Location: Chapter 34
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: St. John Rivers
 
I broke from St. John, who had followed, and would have detained me. It was my time to assume ascendency. My powers were in play and in force … I mounted to my chamber; locked myself in; fell on my knees; and prayed in my way—a different way to St. John's, but effective in its own fashion.
Location: Chapter 35
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: St. John Rivers
 
Then he stretched his hand out to be led. I took that dear hand, held it a moment to my lips, then let it pass round my shoulder: being so much lower of stature than he, I served both for his prop and guide.
Location: Chapter 37
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
 
I will be your neighbor, your nurse, your housekeeper. I find you lonely: I will be your companion—to read to you, to walk with you, to sit with you, to wait on you, to be eyes and hands to you. Cease to look so melancholy, my dear master; you shall not be left desolate, so long as I live.
Location: Chapter 37
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
 
Reader, I married him.
Location: Chapter 38
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
 

Edward Fairfax Rochester Quotes

I knew my traveller with his broad and jetty eyebrows; his square forehead, made squarer by the horizontal sweep of his black hair. I recognized his decisive nose, more remarkable for character than beauty; his full nostrils, denoting, I thought, choler; his grim mouth, chin, and jaw—yes, all three were very grim, and no mistake.
Location: Chapter 13
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
 
I don't think, sir, you have a right to command me, merely because you are older than I, or because you have seen more of the world than I have; your claim to superiority depends on the use you have made of your time and experience.
Location: Chapter 14
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
 
"He is not to them what he is to me," I thought: "he is not of their kind. I believe he is of mine;—I am sure he is—I feel akin to him—I understand the language of his countenance and movements: though rank and wealth sever us widely, I have something in my brain and heart, in my blood and nerves, that assimilates me mentally to him … I must, then, repeat continually that we are for ever sundered:—and yet, while I breathe and think, I must love him."
Location: Chapter 17
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
 
I saw he was going to marry her, for family, perhaps political reasons, because her rank and connections suited him; I felt he had not given her his love, and that her qualifications were ill adapted to win from him that treasure. This was the point—this was where the nerve was touched and teased—this was where the fever was sustained and fed: she could not charm him.
Location: Chapter 18
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester, Blanche Ingram
 
I am strangely glad to get back again to you: and wherever you are is my home—my only home.
Location: Chapter 22
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
 
I sometimes have a queer feeling with regard to you—especially when you are near me, as now: it is as if I had a string somewhere under my left ribs, tightly and inextricably knotted to a similar string situated in the corresponding quarter of your little frame.
Location: Chapter 23
Mentioned or related: Jane Eyre
 
He stood between me and every thought of religion, as an eclipse intervenes between man and the broad sun. I could not, in those days, see God for His creature: of whom I had made an idol.
Location: Chapter 24
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
 
I will be your neighbor, your nurse, your housekeeper. I find you lonely: I will be your companion—to read to you, to walk with you, to sit with you, to wait on you, to be eyes and hands to you. Cease to look so melancholy, my dear master; you shall not be left desolate, so long as I live.
Location: Chapter 37
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
 
Then he stretched his hand out to be led. I took that dear hand, held it a moment to my lips, then let it pass round my shoulder: being so much lower of stature than he, I served both for his prop and guide.
Location: Chapter 37
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
 
Reader, I married him.
Location: Chapter 38
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
 

Blanche Ingram Quotes

I saw he was going to marry her, for family, perhaps political reasons, because her rank and connections suited him; I felt he had not given her his love, and that her qualifications were ill adapted to win from him that treasure. This was the point—this was where the nerve was touched and teased—this was where the fever was sustained and fed: she could not charm him.
Location: Chapter 18
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester, Blanche Ingram
 

St. John Rivers Quotes

St. John, no doubt, would have given the world to follow, recall, retain her, when she thus left him; but he would not give one chance of heaven, nor relinquish, for the elysium of her love, one hope of the true, eternal Paradise.
Location: Chapter 32
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: St. John Rivers, Rosamond Oliver
 
Again the surprised expression crossed his face. He had not imagined that a woman would dare to speak so to a man. For me, I felt at home in this sort of discourse. I could never rest in communication with strong, discreet, and refined minds, whether male or female, till I had passed the outworks of conventional reserve, and crossed the threshold of confidence, and won a place by their heart's very hearthstone.
Location: Chapter 32
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: St. John Rivers
 
I looked at the blank wall: it seemed a sky thick with ascending stars,—every one lit me to a purpose or delight. Those who had saved my life, whom, till this hour, I had loved barrenly, I could now benefit. They were under a yoke,—I could free them: they were scattered,—I could reunite them: the independence, the affluence which was mine, might be theirs too.
Location: Chapter 33
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: St. John Rivers, Diana and Mary Rivers
 
I found him a very patient, very forbearing, and yet an exacting master … By degrees, he acquired a certain influence over me that took away my liberty of mind … But I did not love my servitude: I wished, many a time, he had continued to neglect me.
Location: Chapter 34
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: St. John Rivers
 
I broke from St. John, who had followed, and would have detained me. It was my time to assume ascendency. My powers were in play and in force … I mounted to my chamber; locked myself in; fell on my knees; and prayed in my way—a different way to St. John's, but effective in its own fashion.
Location: Chapter 35
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: St. John Rivers
 

Rosamond Oliver Quotes

St. John, no doubt, would have given the world to follow, recall, retain her, when she thus left him; but he would not give one chance of heaven, nor relinquish, for the elysium of her love, one hope of the true, eternal Paradise.
Location: Chapter 32
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: St. John Rivers, Rosamond Oliver
 

Diana and Mary Rivers Quotes

There was a reviving pleasure in this intercourse, of a kind now tasted by me for the first time—the pleasure arising from perfect congeniality of tastes, sentiments, and principles.
Location: Chapter 30
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Diana and Mary Rivers
 
I looked at the blank wall: it seemed a sky thick with ascending stars,—every one lit me to a purpose or delight. Those who had saved my life, whom, till this hour, I had loved barrenly, I could now benefit. They were under a yoke,—I could free them: they were scattered,—I could reunite them: the independence, the affluence which was mine, might be theirs too.
Location: Chapter 33
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: St. John Rivers, Diana and Mary Rivers
 

Bertha Mason Quotes

While I paced softly on, the last sound I expected to hear in so still a region, a laugh, struck my ear. It was a curious laugh; distinct, formal, mirthless. I stopped: the sound ceased, only for an instant; it began again, louder: for at first, though distinct, it was very low. It passed off in a clamorous peal that seemed to wake an echo in every lonely chamber; though it originated but in one, and I could have pointed out the door whence the accents issued.
Location: Chapter 11
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Bertha Mason
 
What crime was this that lived incarnate in this sequestered mansion, and could neither be expelled nor subdued by the owner?—what mystery, that broke out now in fire and now in blood, at the deadest hours of night? What creature was it, that, masked in an ordinary woman's face and shape, uttered the voice, now of a mocking demon, and anon of a carrion-seeking bird of prey?
Location: Chapter 20
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Bertha Mason
 
What it was, whether beast or human being, one could not, at first sight, tell: it grovelled, seemingly, on all fours; it snatched and growled like some strange wild animal: but it was covered with clothing, and a quantity of dark, grizzled hair, wild as a mane, hid its head and face.
Location: Chapter 26
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Bertha Mason
 

John Reed Quotes

You have no business to take our books; you are a dependant, mama says; you have no money; your father left you none; you ought to beg, and not to live here with gentlemen's children like us.
Location: Chapter 1
Speaker: John Reed
Mentioned or related: Jane Eyre
 

Maria Temple Quotes

I resolved, in the depth of my heart, that I would be most moderate … I told her all the story of my sad childhood. Exhausted by emotion, my language was more subdued than it generally was when it developed that sad theme; and mindful of Helen's warnings against the indulgence of resentment, I infused into the narrative far less of gall and wormwood than ordinary. Thus restrained and simplified, it sounded more credible: I felt as I went on that Miss Temple fully believed me.
Location: Chapter 8
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Maria Temple, Helen Burns
 
The refreshing meal, the brilliant fire, the presence and kindness of her beloved instructress, or, perhaps, more than all these, something in her own unique mind, had roused her powers within her … [Helen] suddenly acquired a beauty more singular than that of Miss Temple's—a beauty neither of fine color nor long eyelash, nor pencilled brow, but of meaning, of movement, of radiance.
Location: Chapter 8
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Maria Temple, Helen Burns
 

Helen Burns Quotes

I hold another creed: … it makes Eternity a rest—a mighty home, not a terror and an abyss. … with this creed revenge never worries my heart, degradation never too deeply disgusts me, injustice never crushes me too low: I live in calm, looking to the end.
Location: Chapter 6
Speaker: Helen Burns
 
I resolved, in the depth of my heart, that I would be most moderate … I told her all the story of my sad childhood. Exhausted by emotion, my language was more subdued than it generally was when it developed that sad theme; and mindful of Helen's warnings against the indulgence of resentment, I infused into the narrative far less of gall and wormwood than ordinary. Thus restrained and simplified, it sounded more credible: I felt as I went on that Miss Temple fully believed me.
Location: Chapter 8
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Maria Temple, Helen Burns
 
The refreshing meal, the brilliant fire, the presence and kindness of her beloved instructress, or, perhaps, more than all these, something in her own unique mind, had roused her powers within her … [Helen] suddenly acquired a beauty more singular than that of Miss Temple's—a beauty neither of fine color nor long eyelash, nor pencilled brow, but of meaning, of movement, of radiance.
Location: Chapter 8
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Maria Temple, Helen Burns
 

Quotes for the "Love, Family, and Independence" Theme

You have no business to take our books; you are a dependant, mama says; you have no money; your father left you none; you ought to beg, and not to live here with gentlemen's children like us.
Location: Chapter 1
Speaker: John Reed
Mentioned or related: Jane Eyre
•Other themes related to this quote: Social Class and Social Rules

Returning, I had to cross before the looking-glass; my fascinated glance involuntarily explored the depth it revealed. All looked colder and darker in that visionary hollow than in reality: … the strange little figure there gazing at me, with a white face and arms specking the gloom, and glittering eyes of fear moving where all else was still, had the effect of a real spirit.
Location: Chapter 2
Speaker: Jane Eyre
•Other themes related to this quote: The Spiritual and the Supernatural

I shook my head: I could not see how poor people had the means of being kind; and then to learn to speak like them, to adopt their manners, to be uneducated, to grow up like one of the poor women I saw sometimes nursing their children or washing their clothes at the cottage doors of the village of Gateshead: no, I was not heroic enough to purchase liberty at the price of caste.
Location: Chapter 3
Speaker: Jane Eyre
•Other themes related to this quote: Social Class and Social Rules

Ere I had finished this reply, my soul began to expand, to exult, with the strangest sense of freedom, of triumph, I ever felt. It seemed as if an invisible bond had burst, and that I had struggled out into unhoped-for liberty.
Location: Chapter 4
Speaker: Jane Eyre

I hold another creed: … it makes Eternity a rest—a mighty home, not a terror and an abyss. … with this creed revenge never worries my heart, degradation never too deeply disgusts me, injustice never crushes me too low: I live in calm, looking to the end.
Location: Chapter 6
Speaker: Helen Burns
•Other themes related to this quote: Religion

I resolved, in the depth of my heart, that I would be most moderate … I told her all the story of my sad childhood. Exhausted by emotion, my language was more subdued than it generally was when it developed that sad theme; and mindful of Helen's warnings against the indulgence of resentment, I infused into the narrative far less of gall and wormwood than ordinary. Thus restrained and simplified, it sounded more credible: I felt as I went on that Miss Temple fully believed me.
Location: Chapter 8
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Maria Temple, Helen Burns
•Other themes related to this quote: Feeling vs. Judgment

The refreshing meal, the brilliant fire, the presence and kindness of her beloved instructress, or, perhaps, more than all these, something in her own unique mind, had roused her powers within her … [Helen] suddenly acquired a beauty more singular than that of Miss Temple's—a beauty neither of fine color nor long eyelash, nor pencilled brow, but of meaning, of movement, of radiance.
Location: Chapter 8
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Maria Temple, Helen Burns
•Other themes related to this quote: Religion, The Spiritual and the Supernatural

I tired of the routine of eight years in one afternoon. I desired liberty; for liberty I gasped; for liberty I uttered a prayer; it seemed scattered on the wind then faintly blowing. I abandoned it and framed a humbler supplication; for change, stimulus: that petition, too, seemed swept off into vague space: "Then," I cried, half desperate, "grant me at least a new servitude!"
Location: Chapter 10
Speaker: Jane Eyre
•Other themes related to this quote: Social Class and Social Rules, Gender Roles, Religion

I climbed the three staircases, raised the trap-door of the attic, and having reached the leads, looked out afar over sequestered field and hill, and along dim sky-line—that then I longed for a power of vision which might overpass that limit; which might reach the busy world, towns, regions full of life I had heard of but never seen—that then I desired more of practical experience than I possessed; more of intercourse with my kind, of acquaintance with variety of character, than was here within my reach.
Location: Chapter 12
Speaker: Jane Eyre
•Other themes related to this quote: Feeling vs. Judgment

It is in vain to say human beings ought to be satisfied with tranquillity: they must have action; and they will make it if they cannot find it. Millions are condemned to a stiller doom than mine, and millions are in silent revolt against their lot. Nobody knows how many rebellions besides political rebellions ferment in the masses of life which people earth. Women are supposed to be very calm generally: but women feel just as men feel; they need exercise for their faculties, and a field for their efforts, as much as their brothers do … It is thoughtless to condemn them, or laugh at them, if they seek to do more or learn more than custom has pronounced necessary for their sex.
Location: Chapter 12
Speaker: Jane Eyre
•Other themes related to this quote: Gender Roles, Feeling vs. Judgment

I knew my traveller with his broad and jetty eyebrows; his square forehead, made squarer by the horizontal sweep of his black hair. I recognized his decisive nose, more remarkable for character than beauty; his full nostrils, denoting, I thought, choler; his grim mouth, chin, and jaw—yes, all three were very grim, and no mistake.
Location: Chapter 13
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
•Other themes related to this quote: Gender Roles

I don't think, sir, you have a right to command me, merely because you are older than I, or because you have seen more of the world than I have; your claim to superiority depends on the use you have made of your time and experience.
Location: Chapter 14
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
•Other themes related to this quote: Social Class and Social Rules, Gender Roles

"He is not to them what he is to me," I thought: "he is not of their kind. I believe he is of mine;—I am sure he is—I feel akin to him—I understand the language of his countenance and movements: though rank and wealth sever us widely, I have something in my brain and heart, in my blood and nerves, that assimilates me mentally to him … I must, then, repeat continually that we are for ever sundered:—and yet, while I breathe and think, I must love him."
Location: Chapter 17
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
•Other themes related to this quote: Social Class and Social Rules, Feeling vs. Judgment

I saw he was going to marry her, for family, perhaps political reasons, because her rank and connections suited him; I felt he had not given her his love, and that her qualifications were ill adapted to win from him that treasure. This was the point—this was where the nerve was touched and teased—this was where the fever was sustained and fed: she could not charm him.
Location: Chapter 18
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester, Blanche Ingram
•Other themes related to this quote: Social Class and Social Rules

I am strangely glad to get back again to you: and wherever you are is my home—my only home.
Location: Chapter 22
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
•Other themes related to this quote: Gender Roles

I sometimes have a queer feeling with regard to you—especially when you are near me, as now: it is as if I had a string somewhere under my left ribs, tightly and inextricably knotted to a similar string situated in the corresponding quarter of your little frame.
Location: Chapter 23
Mentioned or related: Jane Eyre
•Other themes related to this quote: Gender Roles, The Spiritual and the Supernatural

He stood between me and every thought of religion, as an eclipse intervenes between man and the broad sun. I could not, in those days, see God for His creature: of whom I had made an idol.
Location: Chapter 24
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
•Other themes related to this quote: Gender Roles, Religion, Feeling vs. Judgment

I faced the wreck of the chestnut-tree; it stood up black and riven: the trunk, split down the centre, gaped ghastly … their great boughs on each side were dead, and next winter's tempests would be sure to fell one or both to earth: as yet, however, they might be said to form one tree—a ruin, but an entire ruin.
Location: Chapter 25
Speaker: Jane Eyre
•Other themes related to this quote: Gender Roles, The Spiritual and the Supernatural

"Who in the world cares for you? Or who will be injured by what you do?" Still indomitable was the reply—"I care for myself. The more solitary, the more friendless, the more unsustained I am, the more I will respect myself. I will keep the law given by God; sanctioned by man.
Location: Chapter 27
Speaker: Jane Eyre
•Other themes related to this quote: Religion

This was the climax. A pang of exquisite suffering—a throe of true despair—rent and heaved my heart. Worn out, indeed, I was; not another step could I stir. I sank on the wet doorstep: I groaned—I wrung my hands—I wept in utter anguish. Oh, this spectre of death! Oh, this last hour, approaching in such horror! Alas, this isolation—this banishment from my kind!
Location: Chapter 28
Speaker: Jane Eyre
•Other themes related to this quote: Feeling vs. Judgment

There was a reviving pleasure in this intercourse, of a kind now tasted by me for the first time—the pleasure arising from perfect congeniality of tastes, sentiments, and principles.
Location: Chapter 30
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Diana and Mary Rivers
•Other themes related to this quote: Feeling vs. Judgment

St. John, no doubt, would have given the world to follow, recall, retain her, when she thus left him; but he would not give one chance of heaven, nor relinquish, for the elysium of her love, one hope of the true, eternal Paradise.
Location: Chapter 32
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: St. John Rivers, Rosamond Oliver
•Other themes related to this quote: Gender Roles, Religion

I looked at the blank wall: it seemed a sky thick with ascending stars,—every one lit me to a purpose or delight. Those who had saved my life, whom, till this hour, I had loved barrenly, I could now benefit. They were under a yoke,—I could free them: they were scattered,—I could reunite them: the independence, the affluence which was mine, might be theirs too.
Location: Chapter 33
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: St. John Rivers, Diana and Mary Rivers

I found him a very patient, very forbearing, and yet an exacting master … By degrees, he acquired a certain influence over me that took away my liberty of mind … But I did not love my servitude: I wished, many a time, he had continued to neglect me.
Location: Chapter 34
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: St. John Rivers
•Other themes related to this quote: Gender Roles

I broke from St. John, who had followed, and would have detained me. It was my time to assume ascendency. My powers were in play and in force … I mounted to my chamber; locked myself in; fell on my knees; and prayed in my way—a different way to St. John's, but effective in its own fashion.
Location: Chapter 35
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: St. John Rivers
•Other themes related to this quote: Gender Roles, Feeling vs. Judgment

Then he stretched his hand out to be led. I took that dear hand, held it a moment to my lips, then let it pass round my shoulder: being so much lower of stature than he, I served both for his prop and guide.
Location: Chapter 37
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
•Other themes related to this quote: Gender Roles

I will be your neighbor, your nurse, your housekeeper. I find you lonely: I will be your companion—to read to you, to walk with you, to sit with you, to wait on you, to be eyes and hands to you. Cease to look so melancholy, my dear master; you shall not be left desolate, so long as I live.
Location: Chapter 37
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
•Other themes related to this quote: Gender Roles, Feeling vs. Judgment

Reader, I married him.
Location: Chapter 38
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester

Quotes for the "Social Class and Social Rules" Theme

You have no business to take our books; you are a dependant, mama says; you have no money; your father left you none; you ought to beg, and not to live here with gentlemen's children like us.
Location: Chapter 1
Speaker: John Reed
Mentioned or related: Jane Eyre
•Other themes related to this quote: Love, Family, and Independence

I shook my head: I could not see how poor people had the means of being kind; and then to learn to speak like them, to adopt their manners, to be uneducated, to grow up like one of the poor women I saw sometimes nursing their children or washing their clothes at the cottage doors of the village of Gateshead: no, I was not heroic enough to purchase liberty at the price of caste.
Location: Chapter 3
Speaker: Jane Eyre
•Other themes related to this quote: Love, Family, and Independence

I tired of the routine of eight years in one afternoon. I desired liberty; for liberty I gasped; for liberty I uttered a prayer; it seemed scattered on the wind then faintly blowing. I abandoned it and framed a humbler supplication; for change, stimulus: that petition, too, seemed swept off into vague space: "Then," I cried, half desperate, "grant me at least a new servitude!"
Location: Chapter 10
Speaker: Jane Eyre
•Other themes related to this quote: Love, Family, and Independence, Gender Roles, Religion

I don't think, sir, you have a right to command me, merely because you are older than I, or because you have seen more of the world than I have; your claim to superiority depends on the use you have made of your time and experience.
Location: Chapter 14
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
•Other themes related to this quote: Love, Family, and Independence, Gender Roles

"He is not to them what he is to me," I thought: "he is not of their kind. I believe he is of mine;—I am sure he is—I feel akin to him—I understand the language of his countenance and movements: though rank and wealth sever us widely, I have something in my brain and heart, in my blood and nerves, that assimilates me mentally to him … I must, then, repeat continually that we are for ever sundered:—and yet, while I breathe and think, I must love him."
Location: Chapter 17
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
•Other themes related to this quote: Love, Family, and Independence, Feeling vs. Judgment

I saw he was going to marry her, for family, perhaps political reasons, because her rank and connections suited him; I felt he had not given her his love, and that her qualifications were ill adapted to win from him that treasure. This was the point—this was where the nerve was touched and teased—this was where the fever was sustained and fed: she could not charm him.
Location: Chapter 18
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester, Blanche Ingram
•Other themes related to this quote: Love, Family, and Independence

What it was, whether beast or human being, one could not, at first sight, tell: it grovelled, seemingly, on all fours; it snatched and growled like some strange wild animal: but it was covered with clothing, and a quantity of dark, grizzled hair, wild as a mane, hid its head and face.
Location: Chapter 26
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Bertha Mason
•Other themes related to this quote: Gender Roles, Feeling vs. Judgment

Again the surprised expression crossed his face. He had not imagined that a woman would dare to speak so to a man. For me, I felt at home in this sort of discourse. I could never rest in communication with strong, discreet, and refined minds, whether male or female, till I had passed the outworks of conventional reserve, and crossed the threshold of confidence, and won a place by their heart's very hearthstone.
Location: Chapter 32
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: St. John Rivers
•Other themes related to this quote: Gender Roles

Quotes for the "Gender Roles" Theme

Ere I had finished this reply, my soul began to expand, to exult, with the strangest sense of freedom, of triumph, I ever felt. It seemed as if an invisible bond had burst, and that I had struggled out into unhoped-for liberty.
Location: Chapter 4
Speaker: Jane Eyre
I tired of the routine of eight years in one afternoon. I desired liberty; for liberty I gasped; for liberty I uttered a prayer; it seemed scattered on the wind then faintly blowing. I abandoned it and framed a humbler supplication; for change, stimulus: that petition, too, seemed swept off into vague space: "Then," I cried, half desperate, "grant me at least a new servitude!"
Location: Chapter 10
Speaker: Jane Eyre

It is in vain to say human beings ought to be satisfied with tranquillity: they must have action; and they will make it if they cannot find it. Millions are condemned to a stiller doom than mine, and millions are in silent revolt against their lot. Nobody knows how many rebellions besides political rebellions ferment in the masses of life which people earth. Women are supposed to be very calm generally: but women feel just as men feel; they need exercise for their faculties, and a field for their efforts, as much as their brothers do … It is thoughtless to condemn them, or laugh at them, if they seek to do more or learn more than custom has pronounced necessary for their sex.
Location: Chapter 12
Speaker: Jane Eyre
•Other themes related to this quote: Love, Family, and Independence, Feeling vs. Judgment

I knew my traveller with his broad and jetty eyebrows; his square forehead, made squarer by the horizontal sweep of his black hair. I recognized his decisive nose, more remarkable for character than beauty; his full nostrils, denoting, I thought, choler; his grim mouth, chin, and jaw—yes, all three were very grim, and no mistake.
Location: Chapter 13
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
•Other themes related to this quote: Love, Family, and Independence

I don't think, sir, you have a right to command me, merely because you are older than I, or because you have seen more of the world than I have; your claim to superiority depends on the use you have made of your time and experience.
Location: Chapter 14
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
•Other themes related to this quote: Love, Family, and Independence, Social Class and Social Rules

What crime was this that lived incarnate in this sequestered mansion, and could neither be expelled nor subdued by the owner?—what mystery, that broke out now in fire and now in blood, at the deadest hours of night? What creature was it, that, masked in an ordinary woman's face and shape, uttered the voice, now of a mocking demon, and anon of a carrion-seeking bird of prey?
Location: Chapter 20
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Bertha Mason
•Other themes related to this quote: Feeling vs. Judgment, The Spiritual and the Supernatural

I am strangely glad to get back again to you: and wherever you are is my home—my only home.
Location: Chapter 22
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
•Other themes related to this quote: Love, Family, and Independence

I sometimes have a queer feeling with regard to you—especially when you are near me, as now: it is as if I had a string somewhere under my left ribs, tightly and inextricably knotted to a similar string situated in the corresponding quarter of your little frame.
Location: Chapter 23
Mentioned or related: Jane Eyre

He stood between me and every thought of religion, as an eclipse intervenes between man and the broad sun. I could not, in those days, see God for His creature: of whom I had made an idol.
Location: Chapter 24
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
•Other themes related to this quote: Love, Family, and Independence, Religion, Feeling vs. Judgment

I faced the wreck of the chestnut-tree; it stood up black and riven: the trunk, split down the centre, gaped ghastly … their great boughs on each side were dead, and next winter's tempests would be sure to fell one or both to earth: as yet, however, they might be said to form one tree—a ruin, but an entire ruin.
Location: Chapter 25
Speaker: Jane Eyre

What it was, whether beast or human being, one could not, at first sight, tell: it grovelled, seemingly, on all fours; it snatched and growled like some strange wild animal: but it was covered with clothing, and a quantity of dark, grizzled hair, wild as a mane, hid its head and face.
Location: Chapter 26
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Bertha Mason
•Other themes related to this quote: Social Class and Social Rules, Feeling vs. Judgment

St. John, no doubt, would have given the world to follow, recall, retain her, when she thus left him; but he would not give one chance of heaven, nor relinquish, for the elysium of her love, one hope of the true, eternal Paradise.
Location: Chapter 32
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: St. John Rivers, Rosamond Oliver
•Other themes related to this quote: Love, Family, and Independence, Religion

Again the surprised expression crossed his face. He had not imagined that a woman would dare to speak so to a man. For me, I felt at home in this sort of discourse. I could never rest in communication with strong, discreet, and refined minds, whether male or female, till I had passed the outworks of conventional reserve, and crossed the threshold of confidence, and won a place by their heart's very hearthstone.
Location: Chapter 32
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: St. John Rivers
•Other themes related to this quote: Social Class and Social Rules

I found him a very patient, very forbearing, and yet an exacting master … By degrees, he acquired a certain influence over me that took away my liberty of mind … But I did not love my servitude: I wished, many a time, he had continued to neglect me.
Location: Chapter 34
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: St. John Rivers
•Other themes related to this quote: Love, Family, and Independence

I broke from St. John, who had followed, and would have detained me. It was my time to assume ascendency. My powers were in play and in force … I mounted to my chamber; locked myself in; fell on my knees; and prayed in my way—a different way to St. John's, but effective in its own fashion.
Location: Chapter 35
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: St. John Rivers
•Other themes related to this quote: Love, Family, and Independence, Feeling vs. Judgment

I will be your neighbor, your nurse, your housekeeper. I find you lonely: I will be your companion—to read to you, to walk with you, to sit with you, to wait on you, to be eyes and hands to you. Cease to look so melancholy, my dear master; you shall not be left desolate, so long as I live.
Location: Chapter 37
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
•Other themes related to this quote: Love, Family, and Independence, Feeling vs. Judgment

Then he stretched his hand out to be led. I took that dear hand, held it a moment to my lips, then let it pass round my shoulder: being so much lower of stature than he, I served both for his prop and guide.
Location: Chapter 37
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
•Other themes related to this quote: Love, Family, and Independence

Quotes for the "Religion" Theme

I hold another creed: … it makes Eternity a rest—a mighty home, not a terror and an abyss. … with this creed revenge never worries my heart, degradation never too deeply disgusts me, injustice never crushes me too low: I live in calm, looking to the end.
Location: Chapter 6
Speaker: Helen Burns
•Other themes related to this quote: Love, Family, and Independence

The refreshing meal, the brilliant fire, the presence and kindness of her beloved instructress, or, perhaps, more than all these, something in her own unique mind, had roused her powers within her … [Helen] suddenly acquired a beauty more singular than that of Miss Temple's—a beauty neither of fine color nor long eyelash, nor pencilled brow, but of meaning, of movement, of radiance.
Location: Chapter 8
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Maria Temple, Helen Burns

I tired of the routine of eight years in one afternoon. I desired liberty; for liberty I gasped; for liberty I uttered a prayer; it seemed scattered on the wind then faintly blowing. I abandoned it and framed a humbler supplication; for change, stimulus: that petition, too, seemed swept off into vague space: "Then," I cried, half desperate, "grant me at least a new servitude!"
Location: Chapter 10
Speaker: Jane Eyre
He stood between me and every thought of religion, as an eclipse intervenes between man and the broad sun. I could not, in those days, see God for His creature: of whom I had made an idol.
Location: Chapter 24
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
•Other themes related to this quote: Love, Family, and Independence, Gender Roles, Feeling vs. Judgment

"Who in the world cares for you? Or who will be injured by what you do?" Still indomitable was the reply—"I care for myself. The more solitary, the more friendless, the more unsustained I am, the more I will respect myself. I will keep the law given by God; sanctioned by man.
Location: Chapter 27
Speaker: Jane Eyre
•Other themes related to this quote: Love, Family, and Independence

St. John, no doubt, would have given the world to follow, recall, retain her, when she thus left him; but he would not give one chance of heaven, nor relinquish, for the elysium of her love, one hope of the true, eternal Paradise.
Location: Chapter 32
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: St. John Rivers, Rosamond Oliver
•Other themes related to this quote: Love, Family, and Independence, Gender Roles

Quotes for the "Feeling vs. Judgment" Theme

Ere I had finished this reply, my soul began to expand, to exult, with the strangest sense of freedom, of triumph, I ever felt. It seemed as if an invisible bond had burst, and that I had struggled out into unhoped-for liberty.
Location: Chapter 4
Speaker: Jane Eyre
I resolved, in the depth of my heart, that I would be most moderate … I told her all the story of my sad childhood. Exhausted by emotion, my language was more subdued than it generally was when it developed that sad theme; and mindful of Helen's warnings against the indulgence of resentment, I infused into the narrative far less of gall and wormwood than ordinary. Thus restrained and simplified, it sounded more credible: I felt as I went on that Miss Temple fully believed me.
Location: Chapter 8
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Maria Temple, Helen Burns
•Other themes related to this quote: Love, Family, and Independence

While I paced softly on, the last sound I expected to hear in so still a region, a laugh, struck my ear. It was a curious laugh; distinct, formal, mirthless. I stopped: the sound ceased, only for an instant; it began again, louder: for at first, though distinct, it was very low. It passed off in a clamorous peal that seemed to wake an echo in every lonely chamber; though it originated but in one, and I could have pointed out the door whence the accents issued.
Location: Chapter 11
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Bertha Mason
•Other themes related to this quote: The Spiritual and the Supernatural

It is in vain to say human beings ought to be satisfied with tranquillity: they must have action; and they will make it if they cannot find it. Millions are condemned to a stiller doom than mine, and millions are in silent revolt against their lot. Nobody knows how many rebellions besides political rebellions ferment in the masses of life which people earth. Women are supposed to be very calm generally: but women feel just as men feel; they need exercise for their faculties, and a field for their efforts, as much as their brothers do … It is thoughtless to condemn them, or laugh at them, if they seek to do more or learn more than custom has pronounced necessary for their sex.
Location: Chapter 12
Speaker: Jane Eyre
•Other themes related to this quote: Love, Family, and Independence, Gender Roles

I climbed the three staircases, raised the trap-door of the attic, and having reached the leads, looked out afar over sequestered field and hill, and along dim sky-line—that then I longed for a power of vision which might overpass that limit; which might reach the busy world, towns, regions full of life I had heard of but never seen—that then I desired more of practical experience than I possessed; more of intercourse with my kind, of acquaintance with variety of character, than was here within my reach.
Location: Chapter 12
Speaker: Jane Eyre
•Other themes related to this quote: Love, Family, and Independence

"He is not to them what he is to me," I thought: "he is not of their kind. I believe he is of mine;—I am sure he is—I feel akin to him—I understand the language of his countenance and movements: though rank and wealth sever us widely, I have something in my brain and heart, in my blood and nerves, that assimilates me mentally to him … I must, then, repeat continually that we are for ever sundered:—and yet, while I breathe and think, I must love him."
Location: Chapter 17
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
•Other themes related to this quote: Love, Family, and Independence, Social Class and Social Rules

What crime was this that lived incarnate in this sequestered mansion, and could neither be expelled nor subdued by the owner?—what mystery, that broke out now in fire and now in blood, at the deadest hours of night? What creature was it, that, masked in an ordinary woman's face and shape, uttered the voice, now of a mocking demon, and anon of a carrion-seeking bird of prey?
Location: Chapter 20
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Bertha Mason
•Other themes related to this quote: Gender Roles, The Spiritual and the Supernatural

Presentiments are strange things! and so are sympathies; and so are signs; and the three combined make one mystery to which humanity has not yet found the key.
Location: Chapter 21
Speaker: Jane Eyre
•Other themes related to this quote: The Spiritual and the Supernatural

He stood between me and every thought of religion, as an eclipse intervenes between man and the broad sun. I could not, in those days, see God for His creature: of whom I had made an idol.
Location: Chapter 24
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
•Other themes related to this quote: Love, Family, and Independence, Gender Roles, Religion

What it was, whether beast or human being, one could not, at first sight, tell: it grovelled, seemingly, on all fours; it snatched and growled like some strange wild animal: but it was covered with clothing, and a quantity of dark, grizzled hair, wild as a mane, hid its head and face.
Location: Chapter 26
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Bertha Mason
•Other themes related to this quote: Social Class and Social Rules, Gender Roles

This was the climax. A pang of exquisite suffering—a throe of true despair—rent and heaved my heart. Worn out, indeed, I was; not another step could I stir. I sank on the wet doorstep: I groaned—I wrung my hands—I wept in utter anguish. Oh, this spectre of death! Oh, this last hour, approaching in such horror! Alas, this isolation—this banishment from my kind!
Location: Chapter 28
Speaker: Jane Eyre
•Other themes related to this quote: Love, Family, and Independence

There was a reviving pleasure in this intercourse, of a kind now tasted by me for the first time—the pleasure arising from perfect congeniality of tastes, sentiments, and principles.
Location: Chapter 30
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Diana and Mary Rivers
•Other themes related to this quote: Love, Family, and Independence

I broke from St. John, who had followed, and would have detained me. It was my time to assume ascendency. My powers were in play and in force … I mounted to my chamber; locked myself in; fell on my knees; and prayed in my way—a different way to St. John's, but effective in its own fashion.
Location: Chapter 35
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: St. John Rivers
•Other themes related to this quote: Love, Family, and Independence, Gender Roles

I will be your neighbor, your nurse, your housekeeper. I find you lonely: I will be your companion—to read to you, to walk with you, to sit with you, to wait on you, to be eyes and hands to you. Cease to look so melancholy, my dear master; you shall not be left desolate, so long as I live.
Location: Chapter 37
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Edward Fairfax Rochester
•Other themes related to this quote: Love, Family, and Independence, Gender Roles

Quotes for the "The Spiritual and the Supernatural" Theme

Returning, I had to cross before the looking-glass; my fascinated glance involuntarily explored the depth it revealed. All looked colder and darker in that visionary hollow than in reality: … the strange little figure there gazing at me, with a white face and arms specking the gloom, and glittering eyes of fear moving where all else was still, had the effect of a real spirit.
Location: Chapter 2
Speaker: Jane Eyre
•Other themes related to this quote: Love, Family, and Independence

Ere I had finished this reply, my soul began to expand, to exult, with the strangest sense of freedom, of triumph, I ever felt. It seemed as if an invisible bond had burst, and that I had struggled out into unhoped-for liberty.
Location: Chapter 4
Speaker: Jane Eyre
•Other themes related to this quote: Love, Family, and Independence, Gender Roles, Feeling vs. Judgment

The refreshing meal, the brilliant fire, the presence and kindness of her beloved instructress, or, perhaps, more than all these, something in her own unique mind, had roused her powers within her … [Helen] suddenly acquired a beauty more singular than that of Miss Temple's—a beauty neither of fine color nor long eyelash, nor pencilled brow, but of meaning, of movement, of radiance.
Location: Chapter 8
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Maria Temple, Helen Burns
•Other themes related to this quote: Love, Family, and Independence, Religion

While I paced softly on, the last sound I expected to hear in so still a region, a laugh, struck my ear. It was a curious laugh; distinct, formal, mirthless. I stopped: the sound ceased, only for an instant; it began again, louder: for at first, though distinct, it was very low. It passed off in a clamorous peal that seemed to wake an echo in every lonely chamber; though it originated but in one, and I could have pointed out the door whence the accents issued.
Location: Chapter 11
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Bertha Mason
•Other themes related to this quote: Feeling vs. Judgment

What crime was this that lived incarnate in this sequestered mansion, and could neither be expelled nor subdued by the owner?—what mystery, that broke out now in fire and now in blood, at the deadest hours of night? What creature was it, that, masked in an ordinary woman's face and shape, uttered the voice, now of a mocking demon, and anon of a carrion-seeking bird of prey?
Location: Chapter 20
Speaker: Jane Eyre
Mentioned or related: Bertha Mason
•Other themes related to this quote: Gender Roles, Feeling vs. Judgment

Presentiments are strange things! and so are sympathies; and so are signs; and the three combined make one mystery to which humanity has not yet found the key.
Location: Chapter 21
Speaker: Jane Eyre
•Other themes related to this quote: Feeling vs. Judgment

I sometimes have a queer feeling with regard to you—especially when you are near me, as now: it is as if I had a string somewhere under my left ribs, tightly and inextricably knotted to a similar string situated in the corresponding quarter of your little frame.
Location: Chapter 23
Mentioned or related: Jane Eyre
•Other themes related to this quote: Love, Family, and Independence, Gender Roles

I faced the wreck of the chestnut-tree; it stood up black and riven: the trunk, split down the centre, gaped ghastly … their great boughs on each side were dead, and next winter's tempests would be sure to fell one or both to earth: as yet, however, they might be said to form one tree—a ruin, but an entire ruin.
Location: Chapter 25
Speaker: Jane Eyre
•Other themes related to this quote: Love, Family, and Independence, Gender Roles