Julius Caesar

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One of the conspirators. Casca is a cynic—a personality type Shakespeare contrasts with the stoicism of Brutus and the Epicureanism of Cassius—and is therefore sarcastic and rude. He seems to want to kill Caesar not out of jealousy like Cassius, or out of concern for Rome like Brutus, but because he thinks Caesar is a phony. Casca is the first one to stab Caesar.

Casca Quotes in Julius Caesar

The Julius Caesar quotes below are all either spoken by Casca or refer to Casca. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Manhood and Honor Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the The Folger Shakespeare Library edition of Julius Caesar published in 1992.
Act 1, scene 2 Quotes
But those that understood him smil'd at one another, and shook their heads; but for mine own part, it was Greek to me.
Related Characters: Casca (speaker), Julius Caesar
Related Symbols: Rome
Page Number: 1.2.294-295
Explanation and Analysis:

This line is the origin of the common idiom 'it's all Greek to me.' Caesar and his train have left the stage, leaving only Brutus, Cassius, and Casca, the speaker of this quote. Casca is relating to Brutus and Cassius what happened during the public event while the two were plotting. He explains that the cheers they heard were caused by Antony offering Caesar a crown (three times). A cynic, Casca suggests that it was harder for Caesar to reject the crown each time it was offered. He then describes Caesar's epileptic fit, another infirmity ironically paired with power.

The quote specifically refers to the public speech made in Greek by Cicero, a famous orator. Casca cannot summarize the speech because he doesn't speak Greek. Note that in this scene, Casca speaks in prose, while Brutus and Cassius continue to speak in verse (iambic pentameter), a sign that Casca is less educated and less skilled with Language. The cheering people, the language barrier, and Cicero's public speech in Greek emphasize the growing divide in Rome, and the importance of controlling the public opinion. Public oration and persuading the common people to see a certain viewpoint will become extremely important when Brutus and Antony speak after Caesar's assassination.

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Casca Character Timeline in Julius Caesar

The timeline below shows where the character Casca appears in Julius Caesar. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Act 1, scene 2
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
Caesar enters with Antony, Calpurnia, Portia, Decius, Cicero, Brutus, Cassius, and Casca, followed by a Soothsayer and many Plebeians, and Murellus and Flavius. Caesar instructs his friend... (full context)
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
Cassius is glad his "weak words" (1.2.177) were effective, and suggests they ask Casca what they missed, as Caesar's procession returns. Brutus says Caesar looks angry, and the others... (full context)
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
...him to speak into his good right ear. The procession exits, leaving Cassius, Brutus, and Casca. (full context)
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
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Once Caesar is gone, Casca tells Brutus and Cassius that Antony offered Caesar a crown three times, and that Caesar... (full context)
Manhood and Honor Theme Icon
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
Casca goes on to say that the famous orator Cicero addressed the crowd in Greek, which... (full context)
Fate Theme Icon
Cassius makes arrangements to meet with both Casca and Brutus the next day, and the others exit. Alone, Cassius says that though Brutus... (full context)
Act 1, scene 3
Fate Theme Icon
In the street that night, Cicero encounters Casca, who says he has seen many strange sights, including fire dropping from the sky and... (full context)
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Fate Theme Icon
...Cassius says he's been walking in the storm unafraid, daring the lightning to strike him. Casca tells him he's unwise to tempt the Gods. Cassius says if Casca were a true,... (full context)
Manhood and Honor Theme Icon
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...be dead, with only those of women surviving, for things to have come to this. Casca says that the senators mean to make Caesar king the next day. Cassius says "I... (full context)
Manhood and Honor Theme Icon
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Casca agrees that those who are enslaved have the power to free themselves. Cassius says that... (full context)
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
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...other conspirators are assembled. Cassius gives him letters to plant where Brutus will find them. Casca and Cassius discuss how Brutus is essential to their plan, because he's so respected that... (full context)
Act 2, scene 1
Manhood and Honor Theme Icon
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Cassius is admitted, with Casca, Decius, Cinna, Metellus, and Trebonius. Cassius whispers with Brutus, and then suggests they all swear... (full context)
Act 2, scene 2
Manhood and Honor Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Caesar decides to go to the Capitol after all. Cassius, Brutus, Ligarius, Metellus, Casca, Trebonius, and Cinna enter to escort him. Antony enters a moment later, and Caesar teases... (full context)
Act 3, scene 1
Manhood and Honor Theme Icon
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
The conspirators stab Caesar—Casca first, Brutus last. Caesar's last words are "Et tu, Bruté?—Then fall Caesar" (3.1.76). The conspirators... (full context)