Julius Caesar

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Julius Caesar Character Analysis

A famous general, and husband to Calpurnia. His followers wish to make him king, causing Brutus, Cassius, and the other conspirators to kill him before that can happen. Though Caesar's ambition is supposedly the reason he is killed (according to both his murderers and to the rules of tragedy), we don't see much of this ambition in the play. The Caesar we see is certainly vain, even to the point of self-delusion, but also displays firm adherence to his principles and proves himself a perceptive judge of character. Caesar's greatness is evident not so much in himself as in the love he inspires in Antony and the bitter jealousy he inspires in Cassius. At times, Caesar seems to suspect his own imminent murder, but goes toward it anyway, almost as if he seeks martyrdom.

Julius Caesar Quotes in Julius Caesar

The Julius Caesar quotes below are all either spoken by Julius Caesar or refer to Julius Caesar. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
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). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the The Folger Shakespeare Library edition of Julius Caesar published in 1992.
Act 1, scene 2 Quotes
Beware the ides of March.
Related Characters: Soothsayer (speaker), Julius Caesar
Related Symbols: Omens
Page Number: 1.2.20
Explanation and Analysis:

The Soothsayer interrupts Antony's running of the course, a public demonstration, by shouting "Caesar!" The Soothsayer then delivers this famous prophesy, before he is ignored by Caesar and sent on his way. At first Caesar does not hear the prophesy, but Brutus (his eventual killer) and the Soothsayer both repeat the line. "The ides of March" refers to the middle of the month, March 15.

This quote is the first of many omens, and it introduces the question about Fate that will continue to develop over the course of the play: does human reason and decision-making cause events, or are they governed only by predetermined fate? The Soothsayer's ability to accurately predict Caesar's demise suggests the murder was fated, but since Brutus heard the prediction, it could also be said that his actions and decisions were what made the prophesy come true.

The exchange surrounding this quote also gives a glimpse into one of Caesar's infirmities (deafness), placing it in contrast with his image of invulnerability. Privately, Caesar is superstitious, as is revealed moments before this scene, when he asks Antony to touch Calpurnia for luck. But in public, Caesar projects invulnerable manliness, and dismisses the Soothsayer without a second thought.

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Men at some time are masters of their fates:
The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars,
But in ourselves, that we are underlings.
Related Characters: Caius Cassius (speaker), Julius Caesar, Marcus Brutus
Page Number: 1.2.140-142
Explanation and Analysis:

Talking in private away from the spectacle of "the order of the course," Cassius is carefully convincing Brutus to conspire against Caesar. Displaying skillful use of language, Cassius appeals to Brutus's sense of honor, morality, and love of Rome while belittling Caesar and ironizing his immortality and greatness. In this quote Cassius suggests that he and Brutus are subservient to Caesar not because of fate or any particular excellence in Caesar, but because of their lack of action.

This quote brings up the question of fate and reinforces the ambiguity that comes with attempting to answer it. Cassius does not say definitively that fate is meaningless. Instead he says that "Men at some time are masters of their fates." In this particular case, he argues, reason, action, and free will determine the outcome instead of fate and the stars. Cassius pairs this suggestion with an appeal to Brutus's sense of honor and duty to Rome in order to persuade Brutus to act and join the conspiracy.

Let me have men about me that are fat;
Sleek-headed men, and such as sleep o' nights.
Yond Cassius has a lean and hungry look;
He thinks too much: such men are dangerous.
Related Characters: Julius Caesar (speaker), Caius Cassius
Page Number: 1.2.193-196
Explanation and Analysis:

The public event has ended, and Caesar and his train have re-entered the stage. While Cassius and Brutus plan to pull aside Casca and get details on "what the matter is," Antony and Caesar speak privately. Caesar notices a suspicious look on Cassius's face, saying that he is "lean and hungry." Here lean is proverbially related to envy, and hungry and fat are meant figuratively. Caesar wishes that he was surrounded instead by "fat," lazy, well-groomed, predictable men who can sleep at night, because he wouldn't have to fear that such men might be plotting against him. The reference to men who can sleep at night also foreshadows Brutus's sleeplessness as he contemplates assassinating Caesar.

Caesar characterizes Cassius as "dangerous," but Antony quickly responds "fear him not." This moment shows Caesar's political insight, since Cassius is dangerous to him, and Antony's lack of experience and optimism.

Also note the distinction that Caesar makes between what is rhetorically and politically dangerous and what Caesar says he actually fears (nothing). Perpetually idealized and manly, Caesar clearly indicates that he is not afraid of Cassius. Rather, Caesar tells Antony what should be feared rather than what he does fear, explaining that "for always I am Caesar." While Caesar's bravery gives him an appearance of profound nobility, the play also shows how Caesar's public persona as an invulnerable, fearless leader has crossed over into his private life and his opinion of himself, making him blind to the danger actually facing him. He has, in a sense, become trapped inside his public persona, which forces him to continually reject his fears, superstitions, and the warnings and omens he sees and to behave in ways (like going to the Senate on that fateful day) that lead to his death.

But those that understood him smil'd at one another, and shook their heads; but for mine own part, it was Greek to me.
Related Characters: Casca (speaker), Julius Caesar
Related Symbols: Rome
Page Number: 1.2.294-295
Explanation and Analysis:

This line is the origin of the common idiom 'it's all Greek to me.' Caesar and his train have left the stage, leaving only Brutus, Cassius, and Casca, the speaker of this quote. Casca is relating to Brutus and Cassius what happened during the public event while the two were plotting. He explains that the cheers they heard were caused by Antony offering Caesar a crown (three times). A cynic, Casca suggests that it was harder for Caesar to reject the crown each time it was offered. He then describes Caesar's epileptic fit, another infirmity ironically paired with power.

The quote specifically refers to the public speech made in Greek by Cicero, a famous orator. Casca cannot summarize the speech because he doesn't speak Greek. Note that in this scene, Casca speaks in prose, while Brutus and Cassius continue to speak in verse (iambic pentameter), a sign that Casca is less educated and less skilled with Language. The cheering people, the language barrier, and Cicero's public speech in Greek emphasize the growing divide in Rome, and the importance of controlling the public opinion. Public oration and persuading the common people to see a certain viewpoint will become extremely important when Brutus and Antony speak after Caesar's assassination.

Act 2, scene 2 Quotes
Cowards die many times before their deaths;
The valiant never taste of death but once.
Of all the wonders that I yet have heard,
It seems to me most strange that men should fear;
Seeing that death, a necessary end,
Will come when it will come.
Related Characters: Julius Caesar (speaker)
Related Symbols: Omens, Body, Blood, & Pain
Page Number: 2.2.34-39
Explanation and Analysis:

In this scene we see the marriage of Caesar and Calpurnia in contrast with the marriage of Brutus and Portia. Opposing Brutus's secrecy, there is an open dialogue between Caesar and Calpurnia. Calpurnia tries to convince Caesar not to leave the house that day, listing the many omens that have been seen throughout Rome. To that list she adds her own prophetic nightmares in which she foresaw Caesar's death, linking her to the supernatural elements of the play.

In this quote, Caesar says it is far better to die valiantly and honorably than to be a coward, as cowards suffer and "die" constantly. Caesar is trapped by his public persona. He is privately superstitious, and since he believes himself so important, he assumes that the omens are for him—but he cannot act cowardly without bringing about the "death" of the public Caesar and of his self image.

Caesar also reveals his opinion on Fate: death is "a necessary end" that comes to everyone; there is nothing you can do to stop it. For this reason, he argues, death is nothing to be feared. Again, this opinion is paradoxical, because by accepting his death as Fated and refusing to act to prevent it (by staying at home, for example), Caesar allows his 'fated' death to occur. Ultimately, Caesar ignores Calpurnia's warning to save his public image and his self image as fearless and infallible.

Act 3, scene 1 Quotes
Caesar: The ides of March are come.
Soothsayer: Aye, Caesar, but not gone.
Related Characters: Julius Caesar (speaker), Soothsayer (speaker)
Related Symbols: Omens
Page Number: 3.1.1-2
Explanation and Analysis:

The conspiracy is under way. Caesar is now at the Capitol surrounded by conspirators, and will die in this scene. Caesar opens Act 3 by challenging the Soothsayer, suggesting that since it is now March 15 (the ides) and nothing bad has happened, the prophesy must have been wrong. The Soothsayer's cryptic response is to remind Caesar that the ides of March are not over yet—there is still time for Caesar to meet his fate.

This exchange reinforces Caesar's superstition. Despite his public dismissal of the Soothsayer's prophesy, Caesar remembers and has clearly been thinking about the omen. As the play moves towards his climactic death, it seems more and more Fated. At the same time, we still wonder at how Caesar seems to know his death is coming and yet does nothing to stop it. This exchange is the final moment where the living Caesar is tied to the supernatural, foreshadowing his return as a ghost.

Et tu, Bruté? — Then fall, Caesar!
Related Characters: Julius Caesar (speaker), Marcus Brutus
Related Symbols: Body, Blood, & Pain, Rome
Page Number: 3.1.85
Explanation and Analysis:

The conspirators have surrounded Caesar, each kneeling before him, pretending to plea for the reversal of Publius's banishment. Despite their pleas, Caesar refuses to change his mind, remaining "constant as the Northern Star." Beginning with Casca and ending with Brutus, the conspirators then rise one by one and stab Caesar. Supposedly, Caesar stopped defending himself when he realized that Brutus was in on the plot. Caesar then utters the beginning of this line in Latin, shocked at the betrayal of his dear friend Brutus. The Latin translates to "and you, Brutus?" or "You too, Brutus?" Caesar's final living sentence is the dramatic proclamation of his fall. He dies after speaking this line.

Though Antony will ultimately defend Brutus at the end of the play, this deep betrayal of Caesar is the reason that Dante puts Brutus in the deepest circle of hell in his famous poem Inferno. The conspirators justify the murder by reason and logic, seeing it as political necessity for the public good, but Caesar's last line suggests that he felt it instead as a private betrayal. This "rational" murder is also extremely bloody. After the conspirators stab Caesar in excess, they literally bathe in his blood, smearing it all over their arms and their swords to take ownership of the assassination.

The scene is also extremely meta-theatrical, meaning that it shows awareness of itself as theatre. The quote, Caesar's final line, is dramatized by the use of Latin and the climatic final sentence. While the conspirators are bathing in Caesar's blood, Cassius says "How many ages hence shall this our lofty scene be acted over in states unborn and accents yet unknown!" The line calls out attention to the fact that it is being spoken in a scene in a play. At the same time, it also shows how the characters felt during the historical events, reinforcing the idea they lived in the public stage of Rome, and that their actions would be recorded and remembered as history.

Finally, note that even though the play is named for Caesar, he dies at around the halfway point. The remainder of the play must work out tragic deaths for the conspirators.

Act 3, scene 2 Quotes
Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;
I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.
The evil that men do lives after them;
The good is oft interred with their bones;
So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus
Hath told you Caesar was ambitious:
If it were so, it was a grievous fault;
And grievously hath Caesar answer'd it.
Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest, —
For Brutus is an honorable man;
So are they all, all honorable men, —
Come I to speak in Caesar's funeral.
He was my friend, faithful and just to me:
But Brutus says he was ambitious;
And Brutus is an honorable man.
Related Characters: Mark Antony (speaker), Julius Caesar, Marcus Brutus
Related Symbols: Body, Blood, & Pain, Rome
Page Number: 3.2.82-96
Explanation and Analysis:

This quote is excerpted from one of the most famous speeches in Shakespeare. Brutus has already spoken to the public, beginning with "Romans, countrymen, and lovers." Brutus says that he loved and honored Caesar, but killed him because he loved Rome more. The public responds well, even to the point of wanting to crown Brutus. But Brutus makes the crucial mistake of leaving before Antony speaks. Antony, a powerful orator, makes an incredibly skillful speech in which he appeals to emotion, and turns the public against Brutus and the conspirators.

He begins by referring to the public as his friends, stressing immediately his difference from Brutus. Antony then goes on to "bury Caesar," seeming to respect the wishes of the conspirators but actually reminding the public of their love for Caesar while simultaneously casting doubt on "Brutus and the rest." Antony repeats Brutus's name many times, and ironically suggests that Brutus is "honorable." By using his skill with language and making public displays of his private emotions—at one point he pauses in his speech theatrically because he is overcome with emotion and tears—Antony is able to refute Brutus and turn the populace against him, beginning the civil war he predicted in his soliloquy. He carefully reveals Caesar's will and describes the murder with gruesome detail, even displaying Caesar's bloodied body, until the people are so riled up that they begin to riot. All the while, Antony maintains a show of innocence, claiming that he is a bad speaker and doesn't want to cause a commotion.

Act 5, scene 5 Quotes
This was the noblest Roman of all
All the conspirators, save only he,
Did that they did in envy of great Caesar;
He only, in a general honest thought,
And common good to all, made one of them.
His life was gentle; and the elements
So mix'd in him that Nature might stand up
And say to all the world, "This was a man."
Related Characters: Mark Antony (speaker), Julius Caesar, Marcus Brutus
Related Symbols: Body, Blood, & Pain, Rome
Page Number: 5.5.74-81
Explanation and Analysis:

Cassius is dead, and the conspirators' armies are defeated. Believing that he deserves to die, Brutus runs on his sword and commits suicide. He justifies his death saying that it is not to avoid capture, but is rather honorable and a just punishment for his crimes. In the quote, Antony speaks having discovered Brutus's corpse. Antony claims that Brutus was the only conspirator who truly believed he was acting with honor and for the good of Rome, saying that the others only envied Caesar.

While he previously referred to Brutus as honorable ironically, here Antony is being genuine, and Brutus is given an honorable death rite. These lines make a good case that this play can be seen not as the tragedy of Julius Caesar, but rather as the tragedy of Brutus, as his death and failure are in ironic contrast to his virtuous character. Antony praises Brutus, saying that the elements were mixed in him especially well. By elements, Antony refers to the Renaissance belief in bodily "humors"—substances that governed one's temperament and character. His final sentence, attributed to nature, is enigmatic: "This is a man." Brutus is not a great man, or a much beloved one like Caesar, but nor is he described as evil. In the end, Brutus is characterized as simply a man. Recalling his desire to be a dog over a dishonorable Roman, Antony's characterization of Brutus as an honest man leaves Brutus's virtue and philosophy in tact, though his army has fallen and his life over.

Act 4, scene 3 Quotes
Remember March, the ides of March remember:
Did not great Julius bleed for justice' sake?
What villain touch'd his body, that did stab,
And not for justice? What, shall one of us
That struck the foremost man of all this world
But for supporting robbers, shall we now
Contaminate our fingers with base bribes,
And sell the mighty space of our large honours
For so much trash as may be grasped thus?
I had rather be a dog, and bay the moon,
Than such a Roman.
Related Characters: Marcus Brutus (speaker), Julius Caesar
Related Symbols: Omens, Body, Blood, & Pain, Rome
Page Number: 4.3.19-29
Explanation and Analysis:

The two sides are preparing their armies, Octavius and Antony against Brutus and Cassius. But Cassius and Brutus are losing trust and getting frustrated with each other. In this quote, Brutus and Cassius are speaking in private: Cassius is mad at Brutus for punishing one of their officers for a small offense, and Brutus is accusing Cassius of taking bribes. Here he evokes the prophesy of the ideas of March and the ideals for which they murdered Caesar: justice, honor, and the good of Rome. Brutus claims that they assassinated Caesar for being corrupt, and that it would be extremely hypocritical for them to be corrupt in turn. A man of honor and principles, especially Roman principles, Brutus claims he would rather be a dog than a hypocritical man.

Like Caesar, who died in part because of his unwillingness to change his principles or sacrifice his self image of invulnerability, Brutus begins to hurt himself by sticking so firmly to his principles. His insistence on being honorable and his firm belief that the killing was purely logical and justifiable is the reason that Antony was allowed to live, despite Cassius's objections. Now Antony has turned the people against the conspirators, and Brutus and Cassius are fighting amongst themselves because of Brutus's stubborn honor.

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Julius Caesar Character Timeline in Julius Caesar

The timeline below shows where the character Julius Caesar appears in Julius Caesar. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Act 1, scene 1
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...instead of at work. The plebeians say they have come to cheer the great general Caesar's triumph over the sons of his rival Pompey. (full context)
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...decide to split up and disperse more crowds, and to remove the laurel crowns from Caesar's statues. (full context)
Act 1, scene 2
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Caesar enters with Antony, Calpurnia, Portia, Decius, Cicero, Brutus, Cassius, and Casca, followed by a Soothsayer... (full context)
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The Soothsayer warns Caesar to "Beware the ides of March" (1.2.19), but Caesar ignores his warning. (full context)
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Cassius says that Brutus is greatly admired by all of Rome, and that everyone—"except immortal Caesar" (1.2.62)—wishes Brutus knew this. Brutus wonders why Cassius is trying to make him proud, since... (full context)
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They hear cheering, and Brutus says he fears that Caesar is being crowned king. Cassius says that this possibility must displease Brutus, if he fears... (full context)
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Brutus admits he is against the idea, although he loves Caesar, and asks Cassius to get to the point, saying that if it involves honor and... (full context)
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Cassius says that he would rather be dead than bow to Caesar, since Caesar is no better than they. He tells Brutus about the time he saved... (full context)
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...our stars, / But in ourselves, that we are underlings" (1.2.141-2). He then asks why Caesar should be more honored than Brutus, and brings up Brutus's famous ancestor who drove the... (full context)
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...his "weak words" (1.2.177) were effective, and suggests they ask Casca what they missed, as Caesar's procession returns. Brutus says Caesar looks angry, and the others look like they've been scolded. (full context)
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As he passes in the procession, Caesar tells Antony that Cassius looks too "lean and hungry" (1.2.195) to be trusted, saying it's... (full context)
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Once Caesar is gone, Casca tells Brutus and Cassius that Antony offered Caesar a crown three times,... (full context)
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...Flavius have been removed from their offices as tribunes because they took the wreaths from Caesar's statues. (full context)
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...he plans to throw messages through Brutus's windows that night, praising Brutus's honor and impugning Caesar's ambition, and that afterwards it will be easier to move Brutus against Caesar. (full context)
Act 1, scene 3
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...and a lion in the Capitol, which he interprets as bad omens. Cicero asks if Caesar is coming to the Capitol the next day, and Casca says yes. (full context)
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...imposing, need not be feared because he's no mightier than they. Casca guesses he means Caesar. (full context)
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...for things to have come to this. Casca says that the senators mean to make Caesar king the next day. Cassius says "I know where I will wear this dagger then:... (full context)
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...agrees that those who are enslaved have the power to free themselves. Cassius says that Caesar could never have risen so high if other Romans were not so weak, and that... (full context)
Act 2, scene 1
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...his study. Alone, Brutus admits that the only possible course of action is to kill Caesar. He adds that, while Caesar's behavior so far gives no excuse for murder, it seems... (full context)
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...he says that he hasn't slept since Cassius brought up the idea of moving against Caesar, and that the time leading up to a horrible deed feels like a rebellion within... (full context)
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After Decius asks whether only Caesar will be killed, Cassius suggests they kill Antony as well, since he may oppose them... (full context)
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Cassius says that Caesar's superstitions may keep him away from the Capitol, and Decius offers to go to Caesar... (full context)
Act 2, scene 2
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In Caesar's house, Caesar is awakened by both the storm and by his wife Calpurnia's talking in... (full context)
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Calpurnia enters, telling Caesar he must not leave the house that day, but he insists that he will, since... (full context)
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The servant enters and says that the priests advise Caesar not to go to the Capitol, since they found no heart in the sacrificial animal.... (full context)
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When Calpurnia begs on her knees for Caesar to stay, he consents to send the message that he is sick, and remain at... (full context)
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Decius entreats Caesar for an explanation, and Caesar admits that Calpurnia was frightened by a dream where a... (full context)
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Caesar decides to go to the Capitol after all. Cassius, Brutus, Ligarius, Metellus, Casca, Trebonius, and... (full context)
Act 2, scene 3
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Artemidorus reads a letter he's written warning Caesar against each of the conspirators. He plans to stand by the Capitol and hand it... (full context)
Act 2, scene 4
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...asks if he is going to the Capitol. He says that he is, to warn Caesar. Portia asks if he knows of any specific threat against Caesar; he says he doesn't... (full context)
Act 3, scene 1
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Caesar approaches the Capitol with the conspirators, followed by Antony, Lepidus, Publius, Popillius, and other Senators.... (full context)
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In the Capitol, Trebonius talks with Antony, to draw him away. Metellus kneels before Caesar to beg for the repeal of his brother's banishment. The other conspirators join him, in... (full context)
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The conspirators stab Caesar—Casca first, Brutus last. Caesar's last words are "Et tu, Bruté?—Then fall Caesar" (3.1.76). The conspirators... (full context)
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...will support Brutus if he may safely approach and be given a satisfactory explanation for Caesar's death. Brutus praises Antony and grants the request. Cassius remarks that he still doesn't think... (full context)
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Antony enters, and is moved by the sight of Caesar's body. He says that if the conspirators intend to kill him, they should do it... (full context)
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Alone, Antony predicts that a terrible war will engulf Rome as a result of Caesar's murder. A servant of Octavius enters to tell Antony that Octavius has almost arrived in... (full context)
Act 3, scene 2
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Outside, assembled Plebeians demand an explanation for Caesar's death. Cassius leads half of them away while Brutus stays to address the others. Brutus... (full context)
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Antony has entered with Caesar's body in a coffin. Brutus departs, turning the pulpit over to Antony. The crowd denounces... (full context)
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Antony says that he has "come to bury Caesar, not to praise him" (3.2.71). He says that the conspirators who claimed Caesar was ambitious... (full context)
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...honorable Brutus and Cassius, or inciting the mob to riot. He mentions that he's found Caesar's will, which would make the people venerate Caesar if they knew its contents, but that... (full context)
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Antony describes Caesar's murder in graphic terms, and then uncovers Caesar's body. The crowd is ready to hunt... (full context)
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Antony finally reads Caesar's will, which promises a sum of money to every citizen, and announces the conversion of... (full context)
Act 4, scene 1
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...those who should be executed for their part in the conspiracy. Antony suggests they amend Caesar's will so it pays out less money, and sends Lepidus to get it. Antony then... (full context)
Act 4, scene 2
Act 5, scene 3
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...Pindarus to kill him. Pindarus kills Cassius with the same sword Cassius used to stab Caesar. Pindarus then flees Rome forever. (full context)
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...Young Cato, Strato, Volumnius, Lucillius, Labio and Flavius. On seeing the bodies, Brutus remarks that Caesar's Ghost is hunting them all down. He gives orders for Cassius's body to be taken... (full context)
Act 5, scene 5
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...Antony's men closing in. Knowing that he is beaten, and revealing that he has seen Caesar's Ghost a second time, Brutus asks Clitus, Dardanius, and Volumnius in turn if they will... (full context)
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...Antony says that Brutus was "the noblest Roman of them all" (5.5.67), because he killed Caesar out of genuine concern for the future of Rome, while the other conspirators were merely... (full context)
Act 4, scene 3
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...habitually getting people out of trouble in exchange for bribes, adding that since they murdered Caesar for his corruption, it would be hypocritical of them to be corrupt now. (full context)
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...than Brutus. Brutus disagrees, saying he is not afraid of Cassius. Cassius says that even Caesar never insulted him this way, and Brutus says that Cassius was too afraid of Caesar... (full context)
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...send a message to Cassius. Varrus, Claudio, and Lucius all fall asleep. The Ghost of Caesar appears, identifying himself as "Thy evil spirit, Brutus" (4.2.333) when, and saying he will appear... (full context)