Like Water for Chocolate

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Rosaura is Tita’s older sister. She is Pedro’s wife, and the mother of Roberto and Esperanza. As a child, she is a “picky eater” who is afraid of the kitchen. She agrees to marry Pedro, Tita’s sweetheart, even though she knows he doesn’t love her and that it will hurt Tita. Rosaura is deeply attached to traditional family values and obsessed with social status, and will do anything to “keep up appearances.” She has moments of genuinely loving her children and her sisters, but she struggles to authentically connect with them. She dies towards the end of the novel from acute indigestion.

Rosaura Quotes in Like Water for Chocolate

The Like Water for Chocolate quotes below are all either spoken by Rosaura or refer to Rosaura . For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
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). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Anchor Books edition of Like Water for Chocolate published in 1995.
Chapter 4: April Quotes

The baby’s cries filled all the empty space in Tita’s heart. She realized that she was feeling a new love; for life, for this child, for Pedro, even for the sister she had despised for so long. She took the child in her hands, carried him to Rosaura, and they wept together for a long while, holding the child.

Related Characters: The Narrator (speaker), Tita de la Garza, Rosaura , Roberto
Related Symbols: Crying/ Tears
Page Number: 73
Explanation and Analysis:

Tita has just delivered Rosaura’s first child, Roberto. Before his birth, Tita had no interest in the child. Now, Tita’s emotions surprise her. Her instant affection for her nephew, whom she could easily have hated as the product of Rosaura and Pedro’s marriage, provides a testimony to Tita’s deeply loving and nurturing character.

It also reveals the novel’s emphasis on birth, babies, and fertility as symbols of new beginnings and hope. For a long time, Rosaura and Tita have both been insecure and miserable, each nurturing a sense of resentment. Now, even Rosaura, who is usually so focused on outward appearances, can’t help but feel genuine emotion and connection. Tita, whose emotions and desire for connection are always so powerful, allows Roberto to penetrate her heart and prevent her from drowning in her loneliness. Even if for just a moment, their shared love of Roberto washes the slate clean for them both and provides them hope for the future.

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Chapter 8: August Quotes

Tita was literally “like water for chocolate” – she was on the verge of boiling over. How irritable she was!

Related Characters: The Narrator (speaker), Tita de la Garza, Rosaura , Pedro Musquiz
Page Number: 151
Explanation and Analysis:

At this point in the novel, Tita is living alone with Pedro, Rosaura, and Esperanza after the death of Mama Elena. Tita is preparing dinner for John, who is coming over to officially propose marriage. Rosaura has recently made it clear that with Esperanza, she plans to continue the family tradition of forcing the youngest daughter to stay at home forever with her mother. Filled with jealousy over John, Pedro has been annoying Tita with his pleas for her not to marry and his frequent fits of anger. Tita is angry with Pedro for his sense of entitlement and unwillingness to see how he could have prevented this by not marrying Rosaura. Further, she is furious with Rosaura for continuing the very same tradition that has been the source of so much of Tita’s suffering.

The expression “like water for chocolate” means to be at the height of anger. It refers to water when it reaches the boiling stage. In Mexican recipes for hot chocolate, sometimes water is used in place of milk to create a different flavor and texture. With this titular phrase, then, Tita’s emotions are once again linked to food and cooking, as well as to a sense of extreme heat or coldness.

Chapter 10: October Quotes

The truth! The truth! Look, Tita, the simple truth is that the truth does not exist; it all depends on a person’s point of view. For example, in your case, the truth could be that Rosaura married Pedro, showing no loyalty, not caring a damn that you really loved him, that’s the truth, isn’t it?

Related Characters: Gertrudis (speaker), Tita de la Garza, Rosaura , Pedro Musquiz
Page Number: 190
Explanation and Analysis:

Gertrudis is nearing the end of her visit to the ranch. During their week of catching up, Tita has hesitated to tell her sister about her pregnancy because she fears her judgment. Now, she breaks the news to Gertrudis and explains her intense fear about how Rosaura might react if she learns “the truth.”

Gertrudis’ response is contrary to Tita’s expectations. Rather than judging or blaming her, Gertrudis encourages Tita to reconsider the sources of her guilt. By questioning Tita’s concept of “the truth,” Gertrudis asks Tita to reconsider her narrative of reality. Until now, Tita hasn’t questioned the standards of moral propriety, responsibility, and sacrifice that Mama Elena taught her and that polite society reinforced. Gertrudis, who has lived outside the boundaries of that same polite society, doesn’t buy into its moral standards anymore. For Gertrudis, the only way Tita can clear her conscience and move forward is by shedding the entire system of traditional moral views in order to find her own definition of truth.

By suggesting that truth “depends on a person’s point of view,” Gertrudis asks Tita to step outside traditional views of morality to consider a morally relativist point of view. The morally relativist view that she presents is then mirrored in the novel’s own fundamental position on right and wrong—a worldview in which true love is a much stronger and more sacred bond than more socially constructed roles like marriage.

Chapter 11: November Quotes

I, I have some self-respect left! Let him go to a loose woman like you for his filthy needs, but here’s the thing; in this house, I intend to go on being his wife. And in the eyes of everybody else too. Because the day someone sees you two, and I end up looking ridiculous again, I swear that you’re going to be very sorry.

Related Characters: Rosaura (speaker), Tita de la Garza, Pedro Musquiz
Page Number: 214
Explanation and Analysis:

Gertrudis is furious at Tita and Pedro for publically showing their affection when Tita ran to Pedro after he was caught on fire. Until this point, Gertrudis has been in denial about the continued relationship between Tita and Pedro. As long as she saw no clear signs, and as long as Tita was clearly going to marry John, Rosaura could choose to ignore subtle signs of romance between her husband and sister. Now, after they have revealed their true feelings in front of several party guests, Rosaura feels the shock of facing the truth. Even more, however, her anger stems from her deep desire to maintain the social appearances of a perfect marriage and perfect family.

Rosaura punishes Pedro by refusing to sleep with him any more, out of “self-respect.” By calling Tita a “loose woman,” she also emphasizes the social shame of Tita’s actions rather than the personal hurt they have caused her. Rosaura makes herself invulnerable, focusing on her anger about losing social status rather than her sense of emotional betrayal. Her words also reinforce the importance that outward appearances hold to her. She plans to stay Pedro’s wife, refusing to give up a title that she feels gives importance and therefore meaning to her life.

Chapter 12: December Quotes

Little by little her vision began to brighten until the tunnel again appeared before her eyes. There at its entrance was the luminous figure of Pedro waiting for her. Tita did not hesitate. She let herself go to the encounter, and they wrapped each other in a long embrace; again experiencing an amorous climax, they left together for the lost Eden. Never again would they be apart.

Related Characters: The Narrator (speaker), Tita de la Garza, Rosaura , Pedro Musquiz , Esperanza
Related Symbols: Heat and Fire
Page Number: 245
Explanation and Analysis:

In this scene, Tita and Pedro make love after Esperanza and Alex’s wedding. For years, they have continued their affair in secret, busy with managing Rosaura’s feelings and demands, as well as navigating the task of raising Esperanza. Until now, they have never been able to fully express their love without other anxieties or concerns. Now, they have the opportunity to pursue a life together without shame.

This scene validates the theory of Morning Light, which held that when love finds its perfect expression, all of one’s “inner flames” will be lit. Earlier in the passage, Tita resisted the tunnel’s first appearance, feeling she wasn’t ready to die yet. Now, however, she doesn’t “hesitate” when she sees Pedro waiting for her. They climax again together, meaning that they continue sexual intimacy even after death.

What awaits them is described as the “lost Eden,” which is a symbolic choice for numerous reasons. It is the Biblical first home of humankind, and therefore the place of creation. Pedro and Tita’s death is not the end, but the return to the beginning. Further, Eden was the home of Adam and Eve during a time of innocence before the fall of mankind. Through death, Pedro and Tita seem to achieve a clean slate. Even as they continue to have sex in the afterlife, they are without sin because they return to a state of being that predates the Christian concept of sin.

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Rosaura Character Timeline in Like Water for Chocolate

The timeline below shows where the character Rosaura appears in Like Water for Chocolate. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1: January – “Christmas Rolls.”
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Though Tita sees the kitchen as “her world,” her sisters, Gertrudis and Rosaura, see cooking as dangerous. Once when they are kids, Tita convinces them to play a... (full context)
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...Mama Elena says Tita isn’t available. She offers to let him marry her oldest daughter, Rosaura instead. Chencha, the maid, goes into the kitchen and angrily tells Tita and Nacha about... (full context)
Chapter 2: February – “Chabela Wedding Cake.”
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...recipe for the Chabela wedding cake, which Tita and Nacha are baking in preparation for Rosaura and Pedro’s wedding. Tita shakes with nausea, as each of the 170 eggs she breaks... (full context)
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...because, as the narrator remarks, she is “on her side.” Nacha doesn’t get along with Rosaura, a “picky eater” who has often secretly fed Nacha’s cooking to the dog. In contrast,... (full context)
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...exposed legs, and she dropped the fruits. He tried to explain why he was marrying Rosaura, but she refused to listen. She ran away, into the room where Gertrudis and Chencha... (full context)
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Remembering the day she saw Rosaura’s sheets, Tita begins to see white everywhere again and her tears return. She is crying... (full context)
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...did what they failed to do. In the reception line at the wedding, Tita congratulates Rosaura and Pedro. Pedro pulls her near, telling her he has only married Rosaura so that... (full context)
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...without experiencing any of its effects. Vomit and tears fill the wedding hall floor, covering Rosaura’s wedding dress. Even Rosaura get sick, and that night, she and Pedro agree not to... (full context)
Chapter 3: March – “Quail in Rose Petal Sauce”
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...were beyond Mama Elena’s iron command.” A year after the wedding, Pedro brings Tita roses. Rosaura, pregnant with their first child, cries when she realizes the roses are for Tita. At... (full context)
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The novel flashes back to the one occasion when Rosaura tried cooking to compete with Tita, resulting in sick stomachs for the whole family. Now,... (full context)
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...… wonderful!” Pedro is thinking about Gertrudis’ naked body, as he has never even seen Rosaura naked. He imagines Tita might look similar when naked. Pedro thinks of asking Tita to... (full context)
Chapter 4: April - “Turkey Mole with Almonds and Sesame Seeds”
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...to celebrate the baptism of her new nephew, Roberto. Tita’s immense love for Pedro and Rosaura’s baby surprises her. When Pedro hears the sounds and smells the aroma of Tita’s cooking... (full context)
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...from complimenting her cooking, Tita had begun to worry that he’d stopped loving her during Rosaura’s pregnancy. Without Nacha or Gertrudis, Tita had become very lonely. Pedro’s pleasure at her food... (full context)
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Rosaura goes into labor, and Pedro goes to get Dr. Brown. Mama Elena and Chencha travel... (full context)
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Dr. John Brown arrives the next day and examines Rosaura, revealing that Roberto’s birth was very high risk and Rosaura and Roberto could have died.... (full context)
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...and determines to interfere. Tita hears Mama Elena tell the priest, Father Ignacio, that after Rosaura recovers, she will send her and Pedro to live with a cousin in San Antonio.... (full context)
Chapter 5: May – “Northern Style Chorizo”
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...occupied only with feeding worms to a baby pigeon ever since Mama Elena sent Pedro, Rosaura, and Roberto to San Antonio. They must use every part of the pig, as supplies... (full context)
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...Elena call for Tita. The next day, Mama Elena speeds up her plans for Pedro, Rosaura, and Roberto to go to San Antonio, and they leave a few days later. (full context)
Chapter 7: July – “Ox-Tail Soup”
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...John Brown. At that moment, Tita is surprised to see Pedro and a fully pregnant Rosaura approaching from a distance. Rosaura hugs Tita, crying profusely. Pedro hugs her too, and his... (full context)
Chapter 8: August – “Champandongo”
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...upstairs for her baby niece to smell. Esperanza was born three months before, premature from Rosaura’s grief. John performed the dangerous delivery, which required an operation removing Rosaura’s uterus. Pedro wanted... (full context)
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...Tita is annoyed at Pedro’s audacity, calling him a coward for having agreed to marry Rosaura in the first place. She is also angry because on a recent visit from John,... (full context)
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...agrees. The glimmer from the engagement ring reminds Tita of Pedro’s eyes, and she cries. Rosaura mistakes Tita’s tears for joy, and she feels happy, the burden of her own guilt... (full context)
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...her on the bed, “causing her to lose her virginity and learn of true love.” Rosaura, in her room trying to put Esperanza to sleep, sees an explosion of colors coming... (full context)
Chapter 9: September – “Chocolate and Three Kings’ Day Bread”
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...past. She mourns the simplicity of childhood, missing Nacha, Gertrudis, and her good relationship with Rosaura. Lately, she has been making a special diet for Rosaura, who has suffered with extra... (full context)
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...to John and find a place far away where she can have the baby without Rosaura’s knowledge. (full context)
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...eager for her mother to see her success. Later Juan plays music while Gertrudis dances. Rosaura remarks that Gertrudis’ rhythm has always baffled her, as nobody else in her family shares... (full context)
Chapter 10: October – “Cream Fritters”
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...revealing that she is pregnant and that she is afraid that “the truth” will destroy Rosaura. Gertrudis is unfazed, and replies that “The simple truth is that the truth does not... (full context)
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...news, Pedro happily suggests they run away together. Tita tells Pedro they must think about Rosaura and Esperanza, whom Pedro had momentarily forgotten about. They decide to think it over and... (full context)
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...drunkenly singing to her from outside, accompanied by Juan on the guitar. Tita panics, worried Rosaura will hear. The ghost of Mama Elena appears, shaming Tita and telling her to run... (full context)
Chapter 11: November – “Beans with Chile Tezcucana Style”
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After Tita sits to eat breakfast, Rosaura comes downstairs. Following a week in her room without eating, Rosaura has lost all her... (full context)
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Tita is furious about Rosaura’s threats to keep her away from Esperanza. She wishes the earth would swallow Rosaura up.... (full context)
Chapter 12: December: “Chiles in Walnut Sauce.”
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As Tita finishes shelling the last nuts, she thinks of how much Rosaura would have liked this wedding. The narrator reveals that Rosaura has been dead for a... (full context)
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...Alex and Esperanza, using an old family recipe and the wedding ink left over from Rosaura and Pedro’s wedding. (full context)
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...of public scrutiny and the belief that Esperanza should grow up in a traditional household, Rosaura insisted they “maintain the appearance” of a happy marriage. Tita and Pedro agreed to keep... (full context)
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...hearing this, Tita knew they would be “bound together forever.” Tita and Pedro pleaded with Rosaura to change her mind about continuing the family tradition regarding the youngest daughter, but Rosaura... (full context)
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The narrator describes a previous argument that Pedro and Tita had with Rosaura year before, when Rosaura refused to let her daughter go to school. She argued that... (full context)
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When Alex proposed to Esperanza, the narrator explains that Rosaura “fought like a lioness to defend what according to tradition was her right – a... (full context)