Love's Labor's Lost

Pdf fan Tap here to download this LitChart! (PDF)

Jacquenetta Character Analysis

Jacquenetta is seen with Costard as the play begins, leading to Costard’s punishment for violating the no-women oath of Ferdinand’s court. However, it is Armado who falls in love with her, and courts her. Armado is presumably successful in his wooing, as Costard announces at the end of the play that she is pregnant with Armado's child.

Jacquenetta Quotes in Love's Labor's Lost

The Love's Labor's Lost quotes below are all either spoken by Jacquenetta or refer to Jacquenetta. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Love Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Simon & Schuster edition of Love's Labor's Lost published in 2005.
Act 1, Scene 2 Quotes

I will hereupon confess I am in love; and as it is base for a soldier to love, so am I in love with a base wench. . . . I think scorn to sigh; methinks I should outswear Cupid. Comfort me, boy. What great men have been in love?

Related Characters: Armado (speaker), Jacquenetta
Related Symbols: The Nine Worthies
Page Number: 1.2.57-65
Explanation and Analysis:

Armado and his page Mote begin this scene with an exchange of wits, discussing the nature of melancholy and the predicament of studying with King Ferdinand for three years. Here, Armado confesses that he is in love with a woman named Jacquenetta. He describes this woman as "a base wench" whom he seems to wish he did not love in the first place. He believes it is "base" for him to be in love, and believes that love is dangerous since it takes away his self-control.

Armado also feels emasculated by his love, thinking it makes him weak and less of a man. Here, love is dangerous, unwieldy, womanly, and unwanted. Wishing to feel better, he asks his page to remind him of the "great men" of history who have previously been in love. He believes that thinking of these great men will help him, since it will signal that even masculine heroes feel love. The two then discuss these great men, a scene which seems to look forward to the play's exploration of the Nine Worthies in later acts. 

A+

Unlock explanations and citation info for this and every other Love's Labor's Lost quote.

Plus so much more...

Get LitCharts A+
Already a LitCharts A+ member? Sign in!

I do affect the very ground (which is base) where her shoe (which is baser) guided by her foot (which is basest) doth tread. I shall be forsworn (which is a great argument of falsehood) if I love. And how can that be true love which is falsely attempted? Love is a familiar; love is a devil. There is no evil angel but love, yet was Samson so tempted, and he had an excellent strength; yet was Solomon so seduced, and he had a very good wit. Cupid’s butt-shaft is too hard for Hercules’ club, and therefore too much odds for a Spaniard’s rapier. . . . Assist me, some extemporal god of rhyme, for I am sure I shall turn sonnet. Devise wit, write pen, for I am whole volumes in folio.

Related Characters: Armado (speaker), Jacquenetta
Page Number: 1.2.167-185
Explanation and Analysis:

Armado closes Act 1, Scene 2 with this soliloquy, in which he says he loves the very ground Jacquenetta steps on. He makes a play on base, saying that the ground is base, Jacquenetta's shoe is baser, and her foot is basest, using base both literally (low) and figuratively (inferior or bad). For Armado, love appears to be a negative experience. He says that if he really loves, he will be "forsworn" (a liar), and relates love to falsehood. Love, he says, is a devil.

He moves on, however, to remind himself of the strong men of history and and legend who have also loved, like Samson (who "had an excellent strength"), and King Solomon (who "had a very good wit"). Even the hero Hercules fell under Cupid's power. We can note that Armado must constantly reaffirm his manliness, his strength, and his intelligence, since he believes that love is a sign he is lacking in all three areas.

Moving from a devilish, false picture of love to masculine heroic love, Armado concludes with an apostrophe (a rhetorical call to someone who isn't present) to the gods of rhyme. Armado has been inspired by love to write poetry, saying that he will "turn sonnet." (A sonnet is an extremely popular form of love poem comprised of 14 lines—Shakespeare wrote and published many, and included some inside his plays). What's more, by the end of this speech, Armado himself has become a text: "I am whole volumes in folio." Armado takes many views on love, but ultimately concludes that love is rooted in language and poetry, and the possessive power of love is so great that he as a lover embodies whole volumes of poetry.

Get the entire Love's Labor's Lost LitChart as a printable PDF.
Love s labor s lost.pdf.medium

Jacquenetta Character Timeline in Love's Labor's Lost

The timeline below shows where the character Jacquenetta appears in Love's Labor's Lost. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Act 1, Scene 1
Men and Women Theme Icon
Language Theme Icon
Intelligence Theme Icon
...the king. Costard says the letter has to do with him and a woman named Jaquenetta. As Ferdinand reads the letter aloud, Costard interjects his own comments, attempting to defend himself.... (full context)
Men and Women Theme Icon
Language Theme Icon
Intelligence Theme Icon
...he was with a damsel. The king says that damsels count, too, and Costard says Jaquenetta was actually a virgin. This makes no difference, so Costard changes his mind and calls... (full context)
Act 1, Scene 2
Love Theme Icon
Men and Women Theme Icon
...with some kind of a precedent. He finally identifies the object of his love as Jaquenetta, whom he saw with Costard. Armado tells Mote to sing to cheer him up, but... (full context)
Love Theme Icon
Men and Women Theme Icon
...Armado that he is to oversee the punishment of Costard, and that he is escorting Jaquenetta back to the park, where she is allowed to be a “deymaid” (dairy maid). Armado... (full context)
Love Theme Icon
Men and Women Theme Icon
Intelligence Theme Icon
Dull leaves with Jaquenetta. Costard says he hopes he can begin fasting on a full stomach, and asks Armado... (full context)
Act 3, Scene 1
Love Theme Icon
Language Theme Icon
Intelligence Theme Icon
Work, Pleasure, and Comedy Theme Icon
...Costard and bring him so that Armado can have him take a love letter to Jacquenetta for him. Mote asks if Armado is going to try to woo Jacquenetta with song... (full context)
Love Theme Icon
Language Theme Icon
Intelligence Theme Icon
Mote says that Armado loves Jacquenetta “by, in, and without” his heart: his heart cannot come by her, his heart is... (full context)
Act 4, Scene 1
Language Theme Icon
Intelligence Theme Icon
...from Berowne for Rosaline. Boyet takes the letter and sees that it is addressed to Jacquenetta. (full context)
Love Theme Icon
Language Theme Icon
Intelligence Theme Icon
Nonetheless, Boyet reads out the letter, written by Armado. In over-wrought language, the letter describes Jacquenetta’s beauty and (in a very roundabout way) confesses Armado’s love for Jacquenetta. Armado compares himself... (full context)
Love Theme Icon
Language Theme Icon
Intelligence Theme Icon
...upon everyone’s “sweet jests, most incony vulgar wit.” He then laughs at Armado’s love for Jacquenetta, calling him “a most pathetical nit.” (full context)
Act 4, Scene 2
Love Theme Icon
Language Theme Icon
Intelligence Theme Icon
Jacquenetta and Costard enter. She gives Nathaniel a letter that Costard gave her, that is supposedly... (full context)
Language Theme Icon
Intelligence Theme Icon
...of the letter and sees that it is addressed to Rosaline, from Berowne. He tells Jacquenetta to bring the letter to Ferdinand, and she and Costard exit to do this. (full context)
Act 4, Scene 3
Love Theme Icon
Language Theme Icon
Intelligence Theme Icon
Berowne says that he feels betrayed and calls the others inconstant. Then, Jacquenetta and Costard enter, carrying Berowne’s letter. Berowne tries to leave, but Ferdinand stops him. Costard... (full context)
Love Theme Icon
...and all his men “are pickpurses in love, and we deserve to die.” Berowne shoos Jacquenetta and Costard away. They exit. (full context)
Act 5, Scene 2
Work, Pleasure, and Comedy Theme Icon
...tries to make his speech. Costard suddenly goes out of character and tells Armado that Jacquenetta is pregnant with Armado’s child. Dumaine, Boyet, and Berowne all laugh at this development and... (full context)
Love Theme Icon
Work, Pleasure, and Comedy Theme Icon
...a comedy. Armado now enters and announces that he has vowed himself in love to Jacquenetta. He says that there was supposed to be a song at the end of the... (full context)