Mansfield Park

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Edmund Bertram Character Analysis

Edmund is Sir Thomas’s younger son and Fanny’s cousin and later husband. Edmund is a kind, handsome, contentious young man who trains to become a minister and is ordained during the course of the book. He and Fanny are close confidants, and for most of the book he is unaware that Fanny harbors a secret romantic love for him. Edmund is bewitched by Mary Crawford’s charm and beauty, and they begin a romantic courtship. Edmund’s career choice and lack of fortune gets in the way, however. Finally, after Henry and Maria’s affair, Edmund breaks with Mary. He comes to love Fanny, and in the end the two are happily married.

Edmund Bertram Quotes in Mansfield Park

The Mansfield Park quotes below are all either spoken by Edmund Bertram or refer to Edmund Bertram. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Dover Publications edition of Mansfield Park published in 2001.
Chapter 5 Quotes

Manners as well as appearance are…so totally different…A girl not out has always the same sort of dress: a close bonnet, for instance; looks very demure, and never says a word… The most objectionable part is, that the alteration of manners on being introduced into company is frequently too sudden. They sometimes pass in such very little time from reserve to quite the opposite— to confidence!

Related Characters: Mary Crawford (speaker), Fanny Price, Edmund Bertram, Tom Bertram
Page Number: 33
Explanation and Analysis:

Mary speaks this quote during a conversation with Tom and Edmund about debutantes, sparked by Mary asking if Fanny is “out” yet. Mary is confused by Fanny’s lack of interest in Henry, and thinks it might be because she is not yet looking for a husband.

According to Mary, the difference in behavior and manners between a girl who is out and a girl who is not out is significant, with girls who are out (having “debuted” into society) being much more talkative, flirtatious, and confident. Mary sees this distinction as important, but thinks it is tacky when the transition is too abrupt.

This quote shows how Mary favors proper appearances and manners over consistency of character, and thinks that women must alter themselves depending on the social situation and their romantic availability. Her objection to transitions that are too stark, however, might be due to the fact that a marked change in behavior shows the adjustment in manners to be unnatural, revealing the behavior’s artifice. To Mary, the art of manners is to be strategic without appearing so. Fanny’s consistency of character, then, regardless of who is around, and her lack of affection confuses Mary, because her behavior and manners do not fit into the stylized social codes of courtship and debuting.

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Chapter 6 Quotes

Guess my surprise, when I found that I had…offended all the farmers, all the labourers, all the hay in the parish…coming down with the true London maxim, that every thing is to be got with money, I was a little embarrassed at first by the sturdy independence of your country customs.

Related Characters: Mary Crawford (speaker), Edmund Bertram
Page Number: 51
Explanation and Analysis:

In this quote, Mary tells Edmund about her debacle trying to get her harp to the Parsonage. She had not realized that it is unreasonable to ask farmers to use their cart during harvest season, and accidentally offended many of them due to her ignorance.

Mary’s confusion when she could not rent a cart, despite the fact that she was offering money, shows how Mary believes that her wealth can accomplish anything. Moreover, it’s Mary’s city upbringing that has left her ignorant of the ways of the rural working class, which is to say most of the country. Her ignorance comes across as snobbish and rude, since it suggests that she does not understand how hard the farmers must work during harvest time to make their living.

Chapter 9 Quotes

“How can two sermons a week… do all that you speak of? govern the conduct and fashion the manners of a large congregation for the rest of the week? One scarcely sees a clergyman out of his pulpit.”
“You are speaking of London, I am speaking of the nation at large.”
“The metropolis, I imagine, is a pretty fair sample of the rest.”
“Not, I should hope, of the proportion of virtue to vice throughout the kingdom. We do not look in great cities for our best morality.”

Related Characters: Edmund Bertram (speaker), Mary Crawford (speaker)
Page Number: 63
Explanation and Analysis:

In this quote, Mary and Edmund debate their views of ministers and the role they can play in their communities. Mary says that she is skeptical of the idea of ministers making their parishioners better people, since they only give two sermons a week. Edmund argues that she is speaking of London, and that in the rest of the country, clergymen are very present role models in their communities.

When Edmund suggests that Mary’s negative view of absentee clergymen is because of her experience in London, he suggests that London is a place that is less morally sound than the rest of the country. In doing so, Edmund adds to the comments throughout the book that code London, and cities in general, as a place where morality is threatened. When Mary suggests that London is a representative sample, she reveals how little she understands the rest of the country, which thinks of itself as, and indeed is, highly different from the metropolis. Edmund and Mary’s conversation shows that their views on religion and the role of the clergy are highly different, as well as their understandings of the city as a moral landscape.

Chapter 15 Quotes

“I am quite ashamed of you, Fanny, to make such a difficulty of obliging your cousins in a trifle of this sort— so kind as they are to you! Take the part with a good grace, and let us hear no more of the matter, I entreat.”
“Do not urge her, madam,” said Edmund…
“I am not going to urge her,” replied Mrs. Norris sharply; “but I shall think her a very obstinate, ungrateful girl, if she does not do what her aunt and cousins wish her— very ungrateful, indeed, considering who and what she is.”

Related Characters: Mrs. Norris (speaker), Edmund Bertram (speaker), Fanny Price
Page Number: 100
Explanation and Analysis:

This exchange takes place after Fanny refuses to take part in the play, because she does not like to act and because she objects to the morals presented in the script. Mrs. Norris criticizes Fanny for being selfish, and Edmund tries to defend his cousin. Mrs. Norris accuses Fanny of being “obstinate” and “ungrateful.”

Throughout the book, Mrs. Norris terrorizes Fanny and manipulates her into doing what she wants by reminding her of her debt to the Bertrams. Mrs. Norris frequently uses Fanny’s lower class status and financial dependence to try to manipulate her into doing as Mrs. Norris wishes, and even acting against her morals. When Mrs. Norris tells Fanny to take the part “in good grace,” she suggests that by refusing the part, Fanny is showing bad manners. This quote shows how Mrs. Norris pits good manners against morals, using the idea of good manners as a way to encourage Fanny to do something she finds unsavory. While the reader and many of the characters might think that good manners and good morals ought to go hand in hand, Mrs. Norris shows how, by following her sense of right and wrong, Fanny risks social reprove and accusations of selfishness and rudeness.

Chapter 22 Quotes

“I am so glad your eldest cousin is gone that he may be Mr. Bertram again. There is something in the sound of Mr. Edmund Bertram so formal, so pitiful, so younger-brother-like, that I detest it.”
“How differently we feel!” cried Fanny. “To me, the sound of Mr. Bertram is so cold and nothing-meaning–so entirely without warmth or character!–It just stands for a gentleman, and that’s all.”

Related Characters: Fanny Price (speaker), Mary Crawford (speaker), Edmund Bertram
Page Number: 142
Explanation and Analysis:

In this quote, Mary and Fanny are sitting in the garden together, having recently started up a friendship. Mary talks about how she likes that Tom is gone from Mansfield, since while Tom is gone, she is allowed to call Edmund “Mr. Bertram” instead of “Mr. Edmund Bertram” (according to the rules of etiquette, the latter is used to distinguish that Edmund is the younger brother).

Mary and Fanny’s disagreement shows the difference in their love for Edmund. Fanny finds the title stiff and cold, as it removes Edmund’s first name, thus removing his individuality. Mary, meanwhile, is caught up in the glamour and status of a more stately name, showing her desire to marry into wealth and power.

The women’s different reactions reflect the fact that, while Mary continues to wish that Edmund were the older brother, and so the heir to Sir Thomas’s estate and fortune, Fanny loves Edmund for who he is.

Chapter 27 Quotes

Two lines more prized had never fallen from the pen of the most distinguished author— never more completely blessed the researches of the fondest biographer. The enthusiasm of a woman’s love is even beyond the biographer’s. To her, the handwriting itself, independent of anything it may convey, is a blessedness. Never were such characters cut by any other human being as Edmund’s commonest handwriting gave! This specimen, written in haste as it was, had not a fault; and there was a felicity in the flow of the first four words, in the arrangement of “My very dear Fanny,” which she could have looked at for ever.

Related Characters: Fanny Price, Edmund Bertram
Related Symbols: Gold Chains
Page Number: 179
Explanation and Analysis:

Fanny, having walked into the East Room, encounters Edmund writing her a note to leave along with the gold chain he bought for her. After Fanny explains how Mary has also given her a chain, they discuss the matter and then Edmund leaves. Fanny, once he is gone, admires the letter he was writing her.

This quote clearly displays the intensity of Fanny’s love for Edmund, as she obsesses over Edmund’s handwriting. When Fanny says that the two lines Edmund wrote are more prized than the work of the “most distinguished author,” her focus on authorship speaks to her preoccupation with the writer rather than what has been written. Edmund’s note is not exactly poetry, just a message to indicate that the chain is for her, with the affectionate opening “my very dear Fanny.” Still, for Fanny, the authorship of the letter is the important part. This quote shows how authorship can overshadow content or style in letters and perhaps even writing in general.

To Fanny, the letter, even more so than the actual gift of the gold chain, is proof that Edmund cares about her. She refers to the note as a “specimen,” as if her study is a search for scientific truth. This instance is one of many examples in the book of letters being viewed as evidentiary material.

Yes, that uncle and aunt! They have injured the finest mind; for sometimes, Fanny, I own to you, it does appear more than manner: it appears as if the mind itself was tainted.

Related Characters: Fanny Price (speaker), Edmund Bertram (speaker), Mary Crawford, The Admiral
Page Number: 182
Explanation and Analysis:

Edmund speaks this quote as he and Fanny discuss some of Mary’s character flaws just before the ball. Edmund has just come from the Parsonage, where Mary told him she would dance with him for the last time that night, since he will soon be ordained as a clergyman.

Edmund suggests that he believes that Mary’s upbringing has ruined her character, one of many times throughout the book that the characters bring up questions of nature versus nurture. Though Mary is born a gentlewoman, Edmund believes she has been corrupted by the bad influence of the Admiral, and so has gone against her better nature.

Here, Edmund acknowledges the difference between manner and morals. Though he implies that he originally thought some of Mary’s more controversial comments were only “manner,” which is to say affectation or light-hearted frivolity, Edmund has come to see that they may in fact indicate a bad moral core.

Chapter 34 Quotes

His reading was capital, and her pleasure in good reading extreme. To good reading, however, she had been long used; her uncle read well— her cousins all—Edmund very well; but in Mr. Crawford’s reading there was a variety of excellence beyond what she had ever met with…His acting had first taught Fanny what pleasure a play might give, and his reading brought all his acting before her again.

Related Characters: Fanny Price, Edmund Bertram, Henry Crawford
Page Number: 228
Explanation and Analysis:

This quote occurs after Henry has already declared his love for Fanny several days before, and Fanny has swiftly and thoroughly rejected him. Still, Henry continues to pursue her. Here, Henry is reading aloud from the Shakespeare book that Fanny was perusing.

Though Fanny is totally certain of her lack of interest in Henry, his reading greatly appeals to her, and she is spellbound by his performance, as he has a great talent for reading and acting. Previously, he showcased this gift during their ill-fated play.

Henry’s gift for acting seems to be a metaphor for, or actually genuinely related to, his charisma. He often says charming things that make him instantly likeable and attractive. However, like the acting, Henry’s lines are just that: lines, without genuine feeling or intention underneath. Henry’s silver tongue is rarely backed up by corresponding action, as evidenced by previous incidences, such as when he promised his love to Maria and then never asked her to marry him.

Chapter 35 Quotes

I should have thought…that every woman must have felt the possibility of a man’s not being approved, not being loved by some one of her sex, at least, let him be every so generally agreeable. Let him have all the perfections in the world, I think it ought not be set down as certain, that a man must be acceptable to every woman he may happen to like himself.

Related Characters: Fanny Price (speaker), Edmund Bertram, Henry Crawford
Page Number: 239
Explanation and Analysis:

Fanny speaks this quote during a conversation with Edmund about why she will not marry Henry. Edmund professes to not support marriage for money. However, he continues to push Fanny on her reluctance, and tells her that Mary does not understand why Fanny will not marry Henry.

Fanny responds in this quote, where she says that she imagines every woman understands that a woman can have no specific objections to a man and still not want to marry him. Moreover, when Fanny says that “it ought not be set down as certain, that a man must be acceptable to every woman he may like himself,” she points out a massive gender inequality in the marriage process.

Fanny shows Edmund how, although men may choose whomever they like as a partner, women are expected to accept any man without obvious flaws who offers to marry them. Fanny, in resisting this expectation, asserts the importance of her own choice and her own desire in marriage, radically undermining the monetized system of marriage in which women are exchanged as objects.

Chapter 48 Quotes

I purposefully abstain from dates on this occasion, that every one may be at liberty to fix their own, aware that the cure of unconquerable passions, and the transfer of unchanging attachments, must vary much as to time in different people. I only entreat everybody to believe that exactly at the time when it was quite natural that it should be so, and not a week earlier, Edmund did cease to care about Miss Crawford, and became as anxious to marry Fanny as Fanny herself could desire.

Related Characters: Fanny Price, Edmund Bertram, Mary Crawford
Page Number: 319-321
Explanation and Analysis:

In this quote, which occurs after most of the plot has concluded, the narrator is telling the reader how Edmund and Fanny ended up together in the end. The narrator’s manner of articulating the culmination of Edmund and Fanny’s romance, which the reader has ostensibly been hoping for the entire book, is somewhat surprising. There is no grand romantic love scene, no beautiful declaration, no sense of how or why Edmund finally came to love Fanny. Rather than giving the reader what they want, Austen robs them of the scene of Fanny’s “victory.”

Moreover, the narrator, who refers to herself self-reflexively in this passage, states that she will not give an exact date of the beginning of Edmund and Fanny’s romance, saying instead that it was “exactly at the time it was quite natural,” for fear that the reader will think not enough time has passed since Edmund’s love for Mary died out. By saying that the reader will have to decide an appropriate amount of time for themselves, the narrator seems to acknowledge that Edmund’s love is unconvincing, and also renders her own narration somewhat unreliable. Moreover, the narrator’s focus on the appearance that Edmund’s love is genuine undermines the idea that Fanny and Edmund’s love is beyond superficiality.

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Edmund Bertram Character Timeline in Mansfield Park

The timeline below shows where the character Edmund Bertram appears in Mansfield Park. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 2
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Fanny meets the Bertram children: two teenaged sons, Edmund and Tom, aged sixteen and seventeen, and two daughters, Maria and Julia, three and two... (full context)
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Letters and Character Theme Icon
After one week of Fanny’s severe discomfort, her cousin Edmund finds her crying on the stairs. Edmund consoles Fanny, and then, changing tactics, asks Fanny... (full context)
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...in her new home and with her new companions. She plays with Maria and Julia. Edmund continues to be extra kind to her, while Tom, the oldest, teases her jovially and... (full context)
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...now a sailor, sets out on a journey. William’s new career path worries Fanny, but Edmund sets her mind at ease by telling stories of sailing adventures. (full context)
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Edmund continues to be especially kind to Fanny. He gives her attention and books that she... (full context)
Chapter 3
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Edmund is supposed to be entitled to inherit his uncle’s wealth upon his death. However, Tom,... (full context)
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...Sir Thomas’s musings, tells Fanny. Fanny finds the idea very distressing, and discusses it with Edmund, who soothes her. (full context)
Chapter 4
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Without Sir Thomas, the family gets along fine. Edmund takes care of the logistics of managing Mansfield Park to Lady Bertram’s satisfaction. (full context)
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When Edmund returns to Mansfield and sees that Fanny has no opportunities to ride, he insists that... (full context)
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Edmund rejects all of these arguments. Lady Bertram sides with her son, but thinks they should... (full context)
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Edmund is the only family member who is skeptical of the arrangement, as he is concerned... (full context)
Chapter 5
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...is puzzled by Fanny’s reserve and lack of interest in Henry, commenting to Tom and Edmund that she does not understand whether Fanny has debuted in society yet or not (which... (full context)
Chapter 6
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Tom leaves Mansfield. Mary anticipates that, with Edmund as the head of the household, their social events with the Bertrams will be much... (full context)
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...at Sotherton, comparing them to other estates in the area. As they talk, Fanny tells Edmund she wishes she could see Sotherton before Mr. Rushworth makes the improvements. Edmund, surprised she... (full context)
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Mary asks what style of building Sotherton is, and Edmund describes the house. Mary is impressed by his genteel manner in replying. They discuss improving... (full context)
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...her harp, which she is having sent to the Parsonage and arrives the next day. Edmund expresses his desire to hear her play. Mary discusses the difficulty she had in transporting... (full context)
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Edmund says that the harp is his favorite instrument, and Fanny says that she has never... (full context)
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Edmund tells Mary has no plans to write to Tom soon. Mary then launches into a... (full context)
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Mary asks questions about William, making Fanny uncomfortable. Mary and Edmund discuss the navy men they know. Mary, having lived with her uncle the Admiral, is... (full context)
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...at Mansfield Park afterward, and Fanny will stay home with Lady Bertram. Everyone agrees except Edmund, who is quiet. (full context)
Chapter 7
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The next day, Edmund asks Fanny what she thinks of Mary. Fanny says she enjoys Mary’s engaging way of... (full context)
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Edmund goes to the Parsonage daily once Mary’s harp arrives to listen to her play, and... (full context)
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Edmund’s attention towards Mary becomes especially hurtful when he starts using the mare he acquired for... (full context)
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As everyone goes to bed that night, Edmund asks Fanny if she plans on riding tomorrow, because he would like to take Mary... (full context)
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On the fourth day of these long rides, Edmund and Julia are invited to dinner at the Parsonage, but Maria is not because Mr.... (full context)
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When Edmund and Julia return from dinner, the atmosphere of the drawing room, clouded by Maria’s bad... (full context)
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...she walked to Mrs. Norris’s house twice that day to drop off the roses. When Edmund hears that Fanny has been overexerting herself, he is very angry and argues that someone... (full context)
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Mrs. Norris defends herself, saying she makes the same walk all the time. Edmund responds by pointing out that, unlike Fanny, Mrs. Norris is in good health. Mrs. Norris... (full context)
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Edmund does not respond to these comments, and instead brings Fanny a glass of wine. Fanny... (full context)
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...has been feeling very sad and her head hurts, she is suddenly incredibly happy about Edmund’s concern for her and his kindness towards her. (full context)
Chapter 8
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...her that Lady Bertram will stay home and that Fanny will keep her company, while Edmund will join them at Sotherton. Mrs. Rushworth concedes Lady Bertram’s absence, but expresses her disappointment... (full context)
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...returns with the news that Henry can come on the date they agreed upon, and Edmund returns home, where he is informed of the plans. (full context)
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Edmund goes into the breakfast room, where Mrs. Norris worries about if there is enough space... (full context)
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Edmund offers to stay at home in Fanny’s place, prompting an outcry from the others. Mrs.... (full context)
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Ultimately, Edmund does not have to stay home, because Mrs. Grant offers to keep Lady Bertram company... (full context)
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...the carriage ride, Fanny admires the scenery and looks forward to talking about it with Edmund, who is riding his horse behind them. Mary, meanwhile, pays no attention to the environs.... (full context)
Chapter 9
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...their servants to go to prayer while coming up with excuses to avoid going themselves. Edmund defends Fanny’s viewpoint. (full context)
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...the Rushworth daughters bored at church, with an unattractive chaplain, and thinking only of men. Edmund and Fanny do not respond to her right away. Fanny is extremely angry, but Edmund... (full context)
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Julia states that she wishes Edmund were already a clergyman so that he could marry them right then. Mary, who did... (full context)
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...the woods, with Henry heading to the terrace first, then Maria, and Mr. Rushworth following. Edmund, Mary, and Fanny show up close to the gate, sticking together in a group. Lastly,... (full context)
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Mary, Edmund, and Fanny go into the woods, where the temperature will be cooler. Mary brings up... (full context)
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Edmund says that is not his case, and asks if she thinks no one ever chooses... (full context)
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...describes clergymen who give only one or two sermons a week and do little else. Edmund says that Mary is thinking of clergymen in London, not the rest of England. In... (full context)
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...Fanny breaks the silence by saying she would like to sit down for a while. Edmund feels bad for not thinking of her strength earlier, and he takes her arm and... (full context)
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The trio arrives at a bench and they all sit down. Edmund observes that Fanny is very tired. Fanny says she will soon be rested, but Mary... (full context)
Chapter 10
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...so long. Maria, Mr. Rushworth, and Henry stumble upon her. Fanny explains her exhaustion and Edmund and Mary’s abandonment. Maria, Mr. Rushworth, and Henry sit down on the bench as well.... (full context)
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...is annoyed that Henry and Maria would do something so bold. She thinks sadly of Edmund and Mary, who seem to have forgotten her. Suddenly, Fanny hears footsteps, and Julia approaches,... (full context)
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Fanny turns her thoughts back to Mary and Edmund, and decides to go look for them. She finds them mid-laughter, having just crossed back... (full context)
Chapter 11
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Mary, Edmund, and Fanny engage in a long discussion of Edmund’s choice to be a clergyman, after... (full context)
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Maria and Julia then invite Mary to play instruments with them, and so she leaves Edmund and Fanny. As she walks away, Edmund articulates lots of admiring thoughts about Mary’s good... (full context)
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Fanny looks out the window, and says to Edmund that she thinks people would be happier and better if they spent more time contemplating... (full context)
Chapter 12
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...enjoy hearing his stories of gambling and parties, realizes upon his return that she prefers Edmund. She is disappointed by this, but gives up trying to attract Tom, and it quickly... (full context)
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Fanny, however, continues to dislike Henry. She tries to hint at her feelings to Edmund, but he does not catch on. Edmund mentions that Mrs. Grant believes Henry prefers Julia,... (full context)
Chapter 13
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Edmund, who does not like the idea of the play, sarcastically says they should throw an... (full context)
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Later that night, Edmund determines to stop the production from happening. Edmund confronts Tom with his reservations about the... (full context)
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As Tom speaks of Lady Bertram, he and Edmund look over to see that she is exceptionally relaxed, and even about to fall asleep.... (full context)
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Fanny, who overheard the quibble, tries to comfort Edmund by suggesting that they may not find a suitable play. Edmund brushes off this idea,... (full context)
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The next morning Edmund speaks to Maria and Julia, who are just as unwilling to listen to him as... (full context)
Chapter 14
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...and Agatha, which she thinks are unfit to be played by gentlewomen. She hopes that Edmund’s chastisements will sink in and they will change their minds. (full context)
Chapter 15
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When Edmund enters the drawing room, he stumbles upon the group mid-discussion. Mr. Rushworth tells him that... (full context)
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Edmund asks what roles the women are playing, and Maria tells him she is Agatha and... (full context)
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...room to answer a question posed by the carpenter, and Mr. Yates follows him out. Edmund tells Maria that he cannot condone the play they have chosen, saying it is inappropriate,... (full context)
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...care very much, tells Maria to be proper and tells Fanny to order her dinner. Edmund tells Lady Bertram that Sir Thomas would not like Maria playing Agatha. Maria says that... (full context)
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...making for the play and some irrelevant interaction with a servant. No one answers her. Edmund gives up his objections to the play as a lost cause. (full context)
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...story about the servant. They don’t discuss the play much, because of the tension between Edmund and Tom, Julia’s sourness about her part, and the fact that Mr. Rushworth’s repeated attempts... (full context)
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...that Lady Bertram is tired of all their discussion, along with Mrs. Norris, Fanny, and Edmund. Lady Bertram says something pleasant in response, but Edmund says nothing. (full context)
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...been cast. Mr. Rushworth brags about the number of his speeches. Mr. Yates suggests that Edmund should take the part, but Tom refuses to ask him. (full context)
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Mary returns to Lady Bertram, Fanny, and Edmund, and asks Edmund what he thinks they should do about Anhalt. Edmund suggests they change... (full context)
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...she cannot. Tom insists, but Fanny thoroughly objects, and they go back and forth while Edmund watches. Mrs. Norris tells Fanny that she is ashamed of her because she will not... (full context)
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...she thinks that would be fine. They decide to ask a villager. Though everyone expects Edmund to object, he says nothing. Mary then confides in Fanny that she is not very... (full context)
Chapter 16
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...she is not being selfish in refusing it. Fanny feels reassured by the fact that Edmund shares her convictions. Still, Fanny looks around the room and sees Tom’s presents to her,... (full context)
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Edmund knocks on the door and enters the room, asking Fanny for her opinion. He tells... (full context)
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Edmund mentions how kind Mary was to Fanny the night before. Fanny agrees, but not enthusiastically.... (full context)
Chapter 17
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Tom and Maria are thrilled by Edmund’s concession to play Anhalt. They celebrate together privately, saying that Edmund’s decision to act despite... (full context)
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Mary is likewise happy that Edmund will be playing her love interest. Fanny learns that Mrs. Grant has offered to play... (full context)
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...for Julia because of this messy situation, but they do not discuss the matter. Neither Edmund, nor Tom, nor Mrs. Norris notices Julia’s distress because they are so distracted by the... (full context)
Chapter 18
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...Norris, as usual, criticizes her constantly. Fanny nervously awaits the three-act rehearsal, nervous about watching Edmund and Mary do their love scenes. She wonders if they have rehearsed it together yet. (full context)
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...door and Mary enters. Mary asks Fanny if she will practice the love scenes with Edmund’s character with her before she reads them with Edmund himself. Fanny agrees, and they practice... (full context)
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No longer having an excuse to use Fanny instead of each other, Edmund and Mary practice together while Fanny prompts them if they forget their lines. Watching them... (full context)
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...is sick. They are all disappointed, as this means they cannot rehearse. Several people, including Edmund, suggest that Fanny should read the part instead. Fanny hesitates, but finally agrees—when suddenly Julia... (full context)
Chapter 19
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Everyone is shocked by Sir Thomas’s sudden arrival. Julia, Edmund, Tom, Maria, and Mr. Rushworth go to meet their father, while Fanny stays with the... (full context)
Chapter 20
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Edmund goes to talk with his father about the play debacle, apologize, and say they are... (full context)
Chapter 21
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...more somber and less social. Sir Thomas refuses to let anyone besides Mr. Rushworth visit. Edmund laments the exclusion of the Grants, and says that he thinks Sir Thomas would like... (full context)
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...mind the quiet evenings, and then self-deprecatingly suggests that it is because she is strange. Edmund rejects that conclusion and proceeds to compliment her, telling her that Sir Thomas has found... (full context)
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Fanny mentions the fact that Edmund, Tom, and Sir Thomas are going to eat at Sotherton with Mr. Rushworth tomorrow, and... (full context)
Chapter 22
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...accidental visit, Mary plays her harp for Fanny while Fanny thinks of all the times Edmund must have listened to her play the instrument. Mary asks Fanny to come back again,... (full context)
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They are sitting on a bench and discussing Mr. Rushworth and Maria’s marriage when Edmund appears with Mrs. Grant. Mary tells Fanny she is glad that Tom is gone so... (full context)
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Mary and Edmund flirt, discussing the weather and debating whether it is warm out or not. Mrs. Grant... (full context)
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The flirtation between Mary and Edmund distracts Fanny, and she resolves to leave. They all go back into the Parsonage, where... (full context)
Chapter 23
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...but also worries about the pain of having to watch the flirtation between Mary and Edmund. Mrs. Norris, as usual, tries to make Fanny feel like she does not deserve to... (full context)
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In the carriage, Edmund compliments Fanny’s appearance. When they pass the stable yard of the Parsonage, Edmund spots Henry’s... (full context)
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Mary and Henry quietly discuss the fact that Edmund will be ordained soon, and talk about his relatively meager income in the future. Henry... (full context)
Chapter 24
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...brother so much he even lends William his horse to go hunting with him and Edmund. (full context)
Chapter 25
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...story about how he was out riding and stumbled upon Thornton Lacey, the property that Edmund intends to inhabit after he gets ordained. (full context)
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The group goes on to discuss the renovations that Edmund will need to make before the house is satisfactory. Henry and Edmund both have ideas,... (full context)
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...replies that she has not. Mary suggests that Henry go out to Thornton Lacey with Edmund to give his opinion on the improvements to be made, since he did so well... (full context)
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...Mansfield that winter, and hopes he might rent Thornton Lacey. Sir Thomas says he hopes Edmund will be living in the house by then. Edmund tells Henry not to rent the... (full context)
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Mary and Fanny have been listening to the conversation. Fanny laments that soon Edmund will move and she will not see him every day, while Mary continues to wish... (full context)
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...home with the Prices and Mrs. Norris. As they are leaving, Henry seizes the shawl Edmund was about to put around Fanny’s shoulders and does so in his place. (full context)
Chapter 26
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...a ball when Maria and Julia return at Christmas, but Sir Thomas rejects that idea. Edmund, William, and Fanny are all excited. Mrs. Norris insists on putting herself at the center... (full context)
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Edmund, meanwhile, is preoccupied by his impending ordainment, and the fact that he has decided for... (full context)
Chapter 27
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...home to put the necklace in her box in the East Room, where she finds Edmund seated and writing a letter. Edmund tells her he came to look for her, and... (full context)
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Fanny then tells Edmund that Mary has just gifted her a gold chain, and she asks Edmund’s advice as... (full context)
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Fanny is unsure of whether to be happy or sad that she is one of Edmund’s two dearest objects, considering that the other is Mary, and that this clearly means he... (full context)
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...Fanny’s first big debut. She walks upstairs to the East Room, where she again finds Edmund, who seems upset. He tells her that he has just come from the Parsonage, where... (full context)
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Edmund goes on to say that he thinks Mary is naturally good, but has been ruined... (full context)
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Fanny, now alone and dressing for the ball, is thrilled about Edmund’s bad news which, along with the note from Henry asking William to dine with him... (full context)
Chapter 28
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...arrive. Everyone says Fanny looks nice, though Mrs. Norris manages to be mean about it. Edmund tells her to reserve two dances for him. (full context)
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...herself being introduced and making small talk. The Grants and the Crawfords arrive. Fanny watches Edmund and Mary’s interactions carefully. Henry approaches Fanny and asks her for the first two dances,... (full context)
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...her that she is not wearing her chain because it did not fit, and that Edmund gave her another chain that did. Mary is delighted at Edmund’s kindness, and Mary’s clear... (full context)
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...not especially make Fanny happy, but neither does she mind. Fanny enjoys her dances with Edmund, who is not in good spirits because he and Mary have been quarrelling. (full context)
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After dancing with Edmund, Fanny is out of breath and must sit down. William, Henry, and Sir Thomas keep... (full context)
Chapter 29
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Fanny sees William off in the morning and cries afterward. Edmund also leaves for his ordainment in Peterborough. Fanny tries to find someone to discuss the... (full context)
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...and William, and Fanny expects that she will have to get used to it since Edmund will soon be moving away for good. Sir Thomas and Lady Bertram express sadness that... (full context)
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Fanny and Mary experience Edmund’s absence differently. Fanny is relieved by it, but it makes Mary very sad. Mary regrets... (full context)
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Mary and Fanny discuss Edmund’s absence, and Mary asks if she has any news of when he will be back.... (full context)
Chapter 32
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...else, but then dismisses the possibility. Sir Thomas says he regrets that neither she nor Edmund will marry early. (full context)
Chapter 34
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When Edmund returns from his travels, he is surprised to run into Henry and Mary as he... (full context)
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Henry calls on the family the next day to say hello to Edmund, and Sir Thomas invites him to dinner. Later that night, Edmund and Henry walk into... (full context)
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...implying that Fanny, as its mistress, would not allow it. They move on to discussing Edmund’s preaching, the rhetoric of sermons, and the role of religion, debating back and forth, with... (full context)
Chapter 35
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...Thomas determines to try once more to help Henry win over Fanny before he goes. Edmund, who had intended to let Fanny bring up the matter if she wanted, resolves to... (full context)
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Edmund asks Fanny if she is the only one who will not tell him about Henry’s... (full context)
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Edmund goes on to tell Fanny, however, that she should try to let Henry succeed in... (full context)
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Edmund then describes his conversation with Mary about Henry’s affection for Fanny, saying that Mary loves... (full context)
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Edmund, recognizing this, changes the subject, telling Fanny that the Crawfords are leaving Mansfield on Monday,... (full context)
Chapter 36
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Edmund and Sir Thomas discuss Fanny and Henry once again, with both agreeing that Fanny will... (full context)
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...Room. Mary exclaims that she was only in the room once before, when she and Edmund were practicing their lines, and she reminisces about the play. Mary then collects herself and... (full context)
Chapter 37
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...Thomas looks out for signs that Fanny seems sad that Henry is gone. He asks Edmund to look as well, but Edmund does not notice any changes. Edmund is surprised, however,... (full context)
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Edmund, who had intended to go to London, delays his trip and stays home to keep... (full context)
Chapter 40
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...describes how Henry asks about Fanny, how Julia is courted by Mr. Yates, and how Edmund remains at Mansfield. (full context)
Chapter 41
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After Edmund has been in London for a week, Fanny still has not received a letter from... (full context)
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...then talk about Mansfield, which Fanny is happy to do, but when Henry implies that Edmund and Mary will hopefully be engaged soon, Fanny sours. (full context)
Chapter 42
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...from London, and Fanny tells him to send her love to Mary and to tell Edmund to write her. Henry leaves, refusing an invitation to dinner. (full context)
Chapter 43
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...Fanny on the social scene in London, writing about courtships and balls. She mentions that Edmund has been looking handsome. Mary reiterates Henry’s offer that they will come bring Fanny to... (full context)
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Fanny is gratified to learn that Edmund has not yet proposed to Mary, but dislikes that it seems that Mary, despite the... (full context)
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In the days following, Fanny waits for a letter from Edmund, but receives none. Eventually she gives up waiting and focuses on mentoring Susan, who adores... (full context)
Chapter 44
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At last, Edmund’s long-awaited letter arrives. Fanny reads it warily, afraid it will carry the news that he... (full context)
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Edmund then tells Fanny about seeing Henry and Maria interact at a recent party. He describes... (full context)
Chapter 45
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...Bertram that Tom’s fever breaks, but that the doctors continue to worry about his lungs. Edmund serves as the primary source of comfort to Lady Bertram and helps tend to Tom.... (full context)
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...is true. Mary says she would be sorry if he died, but implies that then Edmund would inherit the estate and she would be able marry Edmund and live the lifestyle... (full context)
Chapter 46
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Two days later Fanny receives a letter from Edmund, confirming that they do not know where Maria and Henry have gone, and adding that... (full context)
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...is excited to go as well. They prepare for their travels the next day, and Edmund arrives in the morning. A half hour later, they leave Portsmouth. (full context)
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The trip is relatively quiet, because Edmund is so upset. The family matters weigh heavily on him, and he is also distressed... (full context)
Chapter 47
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Lady Bertram tells how, upon learning the news via letter, Sir Thomas and Edmund went to London to find Maria, but did not succeed, and a unhappy servant exposed... (full context)
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Edmund does not speak to Fanny until five days after she arrives in Mansfield. Edmund tells... (full context)
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Edmund is so disgusted by Mary blaming Fanny, and her focus on the detection of the... (full context)
Chapter 48
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Fanny, back at Mansfield Park and totally certain that Edmund will never marry Mary, is very happy. Edmund, meanwhile, is very upset, and Sir Thomas... (full context)
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...Tom regains his health, and following his illness he is much more considerate and responsible. Edmund’s spirits improve, and Sir Thomas slowly begins to blame himself less, but he does think... (full context)
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...love a younger brother again, but has trouble finding anyone she likes as much as Edmund. (full context)
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Edmund, for his part, finally begins to notice Fanny, and falls in love with her. He... (full context)
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Edmund and Fanny are extremely happy once they are married, and after Dr. Grant’s death they... (full context)