Mansfield Park

Pdf fan Tap here to download this LitChart! (PDF)

Maria Bertram Character Analysis

Maria Bertram is the eldest daughter of Sir Thomas and Lady Bertram, Fanny’s cousin, and Mr. Rushworth’s fiancée and later wife. She is a beautiful, accomplished, well-mannered young woman who attracts the attentions of the boring but wealthy Mr. Rushworth. During their engagement, Maria flirts heavily with Henry, competing with her sister Julia for his attention (besides the competition, Julia and Maria enjoy a close relationship). Six months after Maria marries Mr. Rushworth for his money, she runs away with Henry, disgracing her family and catalyzing her divorce.

Maria Bertram Quotes in Mansfield Park

The Mansfield Park quotes below are all either spoken by Maria Bertram or refer to Maria Bertram. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Dover Publications edition of Mansfield Park published in 2001.
Chapter 4 Quotes

Maria Bertram was beginning to think matrimony a duty; and as a marriage with Mr. Rushworth would give her the enjoyment of a larger income than her father’s, as well as ensure her the house in town, which was now a prime object, it became, by the same rule of moral obligation, her evident duty to marry Mr. Rushworth if she could.

Related Characters: Maria Bertram, Mr. Rushworth
Page Number: 25
Explanation and Analysis:

In this quote, Maria, who is now 21 and of prime marrying age, is beginning to feel the societal pressure to get married. For Maria, marriage is not a dream, but rather a “duty”— an unfortunate reality rather than a happy fantasy. That “duty,” moreover, is not even a religious duty, but according to the quote, becomes confused with a moral one. Maria’s decision to marry Mr. Rushworth is purely strategic: she wants to ensure that she will have a large income and access to the city of London, thus securing her financial and social status. Maria’s understanding of marriage as a practical duty, not a fairytale or even a religious obligation, shows how marriage not only structures women’s romantic lives, but also determines their monetary situation, where they will live, and which social circles they will belong to.

A+

Unlock explanations and citation info for this and every other Mansfield Park quote.

Plus so much more...

Get LitCharts A+
Already a LitCharts A+ member? Sign in!
Chapter 10 Quotes

“Your prospects…are too fair to justify want of spirits. You have a very smiling scene before you.”
“Do you mean literally or figuratively? Literally, I conclude. Yes, certainly, the sun shines, and the park looks very cheerful. But unluckily that iron gate, that ha-ha, give me a feeling of restraint and hardship. ‘I cannot get out,’ as the starling said.”

Related Characters: Maria Bertram (speaker), Henry Crawford (speaker), Fanny Price, Mr. Rushworth
Related Symbols: The Gate at Sotherton
Page Number: 67-68
Explanation and Analysis:

In this scene, Henry and Maria are lingering near the locked iron gate in the woods, waiting for Mr. Rushworth to return and bring them the key while Fanny looks on. Henry and Mary are discussing Henry’s ride to Sotherton with Julia, and Julia’s light-heartedness. The first speaker of the quote is Henry, telling Maria that she should be smiling like Julia, since a “smiling scene” surrounds her.

When Maria responds to Henry, she first asks him if his comment about the “smiling scene” is literal or figurative, and the idea of taking a “smiling scene” figuratively evokes Maria’s impending marriage to Mr. Rushworth, which is socially and financially advantageous, and should ostensibly make her happy. Maria replies that the “sun shines,” and the “park looks cheerful,” but that the iron gate gives her a feeling of “restraint and hardship.”

Maria is describing her actual surroundings—but her words, if read metaphorically, also suggest that, though the marriage Maria is about to enter into is a good match on paper, and though it would provide her with a financially secure and luxurious life, Maria feels stifled by the institution of marriage, and particularly the idea of her marriage to Mr. Rushworth. The gate represents the constraints and strictness of life in a loveless marriage, and so when Maria and Henry later jump over the fence together, they foreshadow their escape from marriage in the form of their adulterous, ruinous affair.

Chapter 20 Quotes

He was going…—He might talk of necessity, but she knew his independence.—The hand which had so pressed hers to his heart!—The hand and the heart were alike motionless and passive now!...She had not long to endure what arose from listening to language, which his actions contradicted, or to bury the tumult of her feelings under the restraint of society… and the farewell visit, as it then became openly acknowledged, was a very short one.

Related Characters: Maria Bertram, Henry Crawford
Page Number: 130-131
Explanation and Analysis:

In this quote, the narrator describes Maria’s thoughts as Henry says goodbye to her for the last time before she is married. Maria had hoped that Henry would propose to her, saving her from a loveless marriage to Mr. Rushworth, but he does not.

Though Maria is not an especially sympathetic character in the book, her heartbreak as it becomes clear that Henry will not propose to her is quite poignant. Henry has been leading Maria on, and divorcing his intimate, flirtatious words from his noncommittal actions (now that he is leaving, Maria has “not long to endure…listening to language which his actions contradicted”).

Maria is confused as to why Henry frames leaving as a necessity when she knows that he can go wherever he wants. In contrast, Maria’s movement, along with most women in 19th century England, is highly restricted because she does not have her own money and cannot travel alone. The difference in their freedom of movement, which Maria evokes by noting Henry’s ability to come and go, serves as just one example of how societal inequalities give Henry the power to control their relationship. Likewise, it is not in Maria’s power to propose to Henry.

Maria strongly feels her restrictions as a woman, especially in terms of marriage, as she indicates when she says she must “bury the tumult of her feelings under the restraint of society,” evoking her earlier sentiments at Sotherton that she feels stifled by the iron gate, which represents the limits of socially acceptable action.

Chapter 21 Quotes

It was a very proper wedding. The bride was elegantly dressed– the two bridesmaids were duly inferior– her father gave her away– her mother stood with salts in her hands, expecting to be agitated– her aunt tried to cry…Nothing could be objected to when it came under the discussion of the neighbourhood, except that the carriage which conveyed the bride and bridegroom and Julia from the church door to Sotherton, was the same chaise which Mr. Rushworth had used for a twelvemonth before. In every thing else the etiquette of the day might stand the strictest investigation.

Related Characters: Julia Bertram, Maria Bertram, Mr. Rushworth
Page Number: 137
Explanation and Analysis:

Here, the narrator describes Maria’s marriage to Mr. Rushworth, which takes place soon after Sir Bertram comes back from Antigua and Henry leaves Mansfield, dashing her hopes of a proposal.

Maria’s marriage is described not as loving or beautiful, but as “proper,” suggesting that, foremost, it has fulfilled all social expectations. The narrator then goes on to list what made it “proper,” with each item separated by an em-dash as if being checked off a list— the fact that the bridesmaids were less beautiful than the bride, that Maria’s father gave her away, that her female relatives feigned emotion. The narrator’s view of the marriage ceremony is distinctly cynical, focused on correct appearances rather than substance, and fulfilling the stereotypical image of a wedding to a tee.

The narrator’s comment that “nothing could be objected to when it came under the discussion of the neighbourhood,” and her later statement that “the etiquette of the day might stand the strictest investigation” suggest that the wedding will be scrutinized and picked apart, with neighbors looking for flaws in the wedding’s properness or the “happy couple’s” happy veneer. Weddings, based on the narrator’s description, are ceremonies to be carried out for the sake of appearances, not happy events for true celebration.

Get the entire Mansfield Park LitChart as a printable PDF.
Mansfield park.pdf.medium

Maria Bertram Character Timeline in Mansfield Park

The timeline below shows where the character Maria Bertram appears in Mansfield Park. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 2
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
...Bertram children: two teenaged sons, Edmund and Tom, aged sixteen and seventeen, and two daughters, Maria and Julia, three and two years older than Fanny respectively. The girls’ fine manners and... (full context)
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
The following day, Julia and Maria are perplexed by Fanny’s lack of knowledge of French, her limited amount of clothing, and... (full context)
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
...feel more comfortable in her new home and with her new companions. She plays with Maria and Julia. Edmund continues to be extra kind to her, while Tom, the oldest, teases... (full context)
Chapter 3
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
...but, because she is so self-centered, is not especially concerned for his safety. Julia and Maria are not sad whatsoever, and instead are excited to benefit from the looser oversight of... (full context)
Chapter 4
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Winter passes without incident. Mrs. Norris pays lots of attention to Maria and Julia, who have blossomed into young women renowned in the area for their accomplishments,... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...company when the other girls go out. She loves to hear about the balls that Maria and Julia attend. She also looks forward to her brother William’s impending visit. (full context)
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
...health suffering from lack of exercise. Lady Bertram and Mrs. Norris tell Fanny to ride Maria or Julia’s horses when they do not want them, but Fanny has few opportunities to... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
The Country vs. the City Theme Icon
Once social events start up again, Mrs. Norris becomes preoccupied with marrying off Maria. Mr. Rushworth, a rich man, is courting her. Maria, age 21, is satisfied with Mr.... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
...make it clear that they have a mutual understanding. After dancing together at several balls, Maria and Mr. Rushworth enter into a tentative engagement, contingent on Sir Thomas’s consent. (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...Thomas, though, indicates via letter that he is thrilled by the match. He insists that Maria wait until he returns home to hold the wedding so that he can attend. Sir... (full context)
Chapter 5
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
...Bertrams and the Crawfords meet for the first time, they immediately like each other. Though Maria and Julia don’t find Henry especially attractive, his charm quickly wins them over. Julia begins... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...and Mary discuss the relative merits of each Bertram girl. Henry implies that he prefers Maria, and Mary waves him off, tells him she likes Julia best, and reminds him that... (full context)
Chapter 7
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...of these long rides, Edmund and Julia are invited to dinner at the Parsonage, but Maria is not because Mr. Rushworth is supposed to pay a visit to Mansfield. Still, the... (full context)
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
When Edmund and Julia return from dinner, the atmosphere of the drawing room, clouded by Maria’s bad mood, is sullen. Edmund finds Fanny lying on the sofa at the other end... (full context)
Chapter 8
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...the outing, arrives. Henry arrives in his barouche to take them to Sotherton, with both Maria and Julia vying for the seat in the front next to Henry. Mrs. Grant suggests... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Maria is sullen because Julia is sitting in the front with Henry, and she grows jealous... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Once they arrive closer to Sotherton, however, Maria remembers her engagement to Mr. Rushworth and perks up. She points out the land that... (full context)
Chapter 9
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Julia, meanwhile, calls Henry’s attention to Maria and Mr. Rushworth, saying that the chapel surroundings make them look like a bride and... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...of the garden and into the woods, with Henry heading to the terrace first, then Maria, and Mr. Rushworth following. Edmund, Mary, and Fanny show up close to the gate, sticking... (full context)
Chapter 10
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...and Fanny is still sitting on the bench, surprised to be left for so long. Maria, Mr. Rushworth, and Henry stumble upon her. Fanny explains her exhaustion and Edmund and Mary’s... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Maria says she would like to go through the iron gate into the park. Everyone agrees,... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
With Mr. Rushworth gone, Maria and Henry discuss his thoughts on the house. Henry says it is bigger and grander... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
There is a silence between them, and then Maria comments that Henry seemed to enjoy driving with Julia that morning. Henry says he does... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Henry proposes that they jump the fence instead of waiting for the key. Maria agrees. Henry says that even if they are out of sight before he returns, Fanny... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Fanny, alone again, is annoyed that Henry and Maria would do something so bold. She thinks sadly of Edmund and Mary, who seem to... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...to sooth Mr. Rushworth’s hurt feelings, then tries to encourage him to catch up with Maria, Julia, and Henry. At last Mr. Rushworth agrees and sets off, going through the gate... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Maria, Julia, Henry, and Mr. Rushworth return late. Things are still a little tense because Maria... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...Henry suggests that Julia sit with him again up front, much to Julia’s delight and Maria’s disappointment. Mr. Rushworth says goodbye to Maria, helping her into the carriage. (full context)
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
...good day for Fanny, and that she expects her to be grateful as a result. Maria makes a snarky comment about how Mrs. Norris has left with so many presents and... (full context)
Chapter 11
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Letters and Character Theme Icon
...will return in November since he has finished his business in the West Indies. Neither Maria nor Julia is happy about this update, since he is so strict. Maria is especially... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Maria and Julia then invite Mary to play instruments with them, and so she leaves Edmund... (full context)
Chapter 12
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Henry, meanwhile, leaves Mansfield for his property in Norfolk for two weeks. During his absence, Maria and Julia are extremely bored. (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
During those two weeks Maria spends a lot of time with Mr. Rushworth, who bores her out of her mind,... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...he hopes that is the case. Fanny says that it almost seems like he prefers Maria, except that she is engaged, and Edmund speculates that this is so he will have... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
...a ball, which happens to be Fanny’s first. Mrs. Norris draws Mrs. Rushworth’s attention to Maria and Mr. Rushworth, who are dance partners. Maria does look happy and talks excitedly to... (full context)
Chapter 13
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...Park, with Yates as manager. Tom becomes fixated on the idea, and it catches with Maria and Julia as well. Henry wholeheartedly voices his support. Tom insists that in order to... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
...that he thinks it would be improper, especially since their father is absent, and since Maria is about to be married to Mr. Rushworth. Tom complains that Edmund takes everything too... (full context)
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
...brushes off this idea, and says that all he can do is try to persuade Maria and Julia not to take part. Fanny suggests that Mrs. Norris might side with him.... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
The next morning Edmund speaks to Maria and Julia, who are just as unwilling to listen to him as Tom. As Edmund... (full context)
Chapter 14
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
...the set, and the curtain is being made before the script is even picked. Julia, Maria, Henry, and Mr. Yates want the play to be a tragedy, while Tom and Mary... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
Maria and Julia both want to play Agatha, Frederick’s mother. Julia points out that there is... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
...silence, the conversation turns back to the play. Tom and Yates discuss the scenery while Maria talks with Henry. Eventually, Tom and Yates leave to look in the billiards room, which... (full context)
Chapter 15
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Maria returns home, reporting that Mary has accepted her part. Mr. Rushworth arrives at the house,... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Edmund asks what roles the women are playing, and Maria tells him she is Agatha and Mary is Amelia. Edmund turns to sit near Mrs.... (full context)
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
...answer a question posed by the carpenter, and Mr. Yates follows him out. Edmund tells Maria that he cannot condone the play they have chosen, saying it is inappropriate, and hopes... (full context)
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
Lady Bertram, who seems to not care very much, tells Maria to be proper and tells Fanny to order her dinner. Edmund tells Lady Bertram that... (full context)
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Mrs. Norris agrees with Maria, and says they should not waste money on a new set. She adds that, since... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
After dinner, Tom, Maria, and Mr. Yates go into the drawing room to study the play. Henry and Mary... (full context)
Chapter 17
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Tom and Maria are thrilled by Edmund’s concession to play Anhalt. They celebrate together privately, saying that Edmund’s... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
...led her on for so long. Julia, who can no longer deny that Henry prefers Maria, mopes around and flirts with Mr. Yates. Henry hoped to clear the air by complimenting... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...is shocked and tells her to think of Mr. Rushworth. Mary responds by saying that Maria is the one who needs to think of him, or risk losing his fortune and... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
...loves him and hopes he will fall in love with her. She is angry at Maria, with whom she is normally very close. Fanny feels bad for Julia because of this... (full context)
Chapter 19
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Everyone is shocked by Sir Thomas’s sudden arrival. Julia, Edmund, Tom, Maria, and Mr. Rushworth go to meet their father, while Fanny stays with the guests. The... (full context)
Chapter 20
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
The Country vs. the City Theme Icon
In the evening, Sir Thomas lounges in the drawing room while his daughters play music. Maria is nervous while she plays because she is hoping Henry will declare his love for... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...that there is no chance that the play will be resumed. Henry says goodbye to Maria, who cannot understand why he is going away since he is supposed to be in... (full context)
Chapter 21
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
...out to be right, and Sir Thomas, recognizing how unappealing Mr. Rushworth is, talks to Maria to ask if Mr. Rushworth is really her husband of choice. Maria, who has given... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...the wedding arrangements and Mrs. Rushworth starts to organize to move to Bath and leave Maria and Mr. Rushworth with the house. Not long after Sir Thomas’s return, Maria and Mr.... (full context)
Chapter 22
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
They are sitting on a bench and discussing Mr. Rushworth and Maria’s marriage when Edmund appears with Mrs. Grant. Mary tells Fanny she is glad that Tom... (full context)
Chapter 23
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
...men discuss hunting while Fanny thinks about the fact that Henry is present even though Maria and Julia are in Brighton. Henry acknowledges that Fanny’s cousins are away, and they discuss... (full context)
Chapter 24
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Letters and Character Theme Icon
As Henry flirts with Fanny, Fanny does not forget what Henry did to Maria and Julia, but feels his charms soften her hatred for him. Henry tries to be... (full context)
Chapter 25
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
Mrs. Norris, catching on the topic of Sotherton, tells William that Maria and Mr. Rushworth are at Brighton and that William should visit them on his way... (full context)
Chapter 26
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
...decides to throw a ball before William leaves. Mrs. Norris suggests instead a ball when Maria and Julia return at Christmas, but Sir Thomas rejects that idea. Edmund, William, and Fanny... (full context)
Chapter 29
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Letters and Character Theme Icon
The Country vs. the City Theme Icon
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
...Julia, who was supposed to return home soon, decided instead to go to London with Maria. To each other, the Bertrams say how glad they are to have Fanny, who they... (full context)
Chapter 30
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
...despite his flirtatious behavior, since he loves her. They discuss the fact that Julia and Maria will be angry, but that they will eventually forget about it. Henry plans to do... (full context)
Chapter 32
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
...does not like Henry, and Fanny wants to tell him about how Henry played with Maria and Julia’s affections, but does not want to betray them to their father. Sir Thomas... (full context)
Chapter 35
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
...unalike as she thinks, that she should judge him less harshly for his behavior toward Maria and Julia during the play. Fanny senses, as Edmund talks, that his thoughts drift to... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...was in love with her, and even if she did, after what he did to Maria and Julia, she could not trust him. Edmund understands, but Fanny is growing agitated. (full context)
Chapter 43
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Letters and Character Theme Icon
...Fanny to Mansfield whenever she wants, and she mentions a party where they will see Maria and Mr. Rushworth. (full context)
Chapter 44
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Letters and Character Theme Icon
Edmund then tells Fanny about seeing Henry and Maria interact at a recent party. He describes the coolness between them, and says that Maria... (full context)
Chapter 45
The Country vs. the City Theme Icon
...everyone at Mansfield through Tom’s illness and enjoy the spring weather. Fanny is astonished that Maria and Julia remain in London during their brother’s time of need, and decides that London... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Letters and Character Theme Icon
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
...his occupation as a clergyman. In a postscript, Mary says that Henry has just seen Maria and discussed Tom’s illness with her. Despite Henry’s attentions to Maria, Mary reassures Fanny that... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Letters and Character Theme Icon
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
...hope that Tom will die disgusts Fanny. Likewise, she is skeptical of Henry’s relationship with Maria, which she suspects is a flirtation. She is, however, tempted to take Mary up on... (full context)
Chapter 46
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Letters and Character Theme Icon
...society page articles is referring to her cousin. Fanny reads the excerpt, which states that Maria has run away with Henry and their whereabouts are unknown. Fanny insists it must be... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
...days later Fanny receives a letter from Edmund, confirming that they do not know where Maria and Henry have gone, and adding that Julia has eloped with Mr. Yates. Edmund also... (full context)
Chapter 47
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
Mrs. Norris is extraordinarily disturbed by Maria’s scandal and the general disruption in the house due to Tom’s illness. Naturally, she is... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Fanny consoles and supports Lady Bertram, who tells her exactly what happened between Maria and Henry, detailing the flirtation that led up to their escape together. (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Letters and Character Theme Icon
...upon learning the news via letter, Sir Thomas and Edmund went to London to find Maria, but did not succeed, and a unhappy servant exposed the story to the public. Sir... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
...see Mary while he was in London, where Mary expressed anger at both Henry and Maria. Her anger, though, was at the fact that they let themselves be found out, not... (full context)
Chapter 48
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
...improve, and Sir Thomas slowly begins to blame himself less, but he does think that Maria and Julia’s upbringing was the cause for their bad choices. (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Mr. Rushworth divorces Maria. Once Henry eventually leaves her (it is unclear in the text why or when he... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Inheritance and Meritocracy Theme Icon
Julia having fared better than Maria, the narrator notes, is perhaps due to the fact that she was always less spoiled... (full context)
Money and Marriage Theme Icon
Manners vs. Morality Theme Icon
...that, had Henry kept trying, he might have eventually succeeded in securing Fanny’s affections. After Maria’s coldness to him at a party, his vanity made him pursue Maria once more. Henry... (full context)