Mockingjay

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Peeta Mellark Character Analysis

Peeta Mellark, a handsome, charismatic victor in the Hunger Games, faces more than one kind of torture in Mockingjay. To begin with, he is apprehended by the government and tortured, based on the assumption that he and his friends are rebel agents, working to kill President Coriolanus Snow. He’s forced to appear on television and deliver discouraging messages to Katniss and the rebel alliance—a job that he clearly despises. After the rebels free Peeta from captivity, it’s revealed that he’s been conditioned to regard Katniss as an enemy. Thus, for the remainder of the novel, he must struggle to recover his old feelings of love and affection for Katniss. Although Peeta is frequently a danger to Katniss and to the other rebel soldiers, he shows many signs of his old charisma and nobility, staying calm in the face of danger long after his peers have become paralyzed by fear. In the end, Katniss “chooses” to love Peeta because Peeta embodies mercy, justice, love, and peace.

Peeta Mellark Quotes in Mockingjay

The Mockingjay quotes below are all either spoken by Peeta Mellark or refer to Peeta Mellark . For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Revolution and Its Problems Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Scholastic Press edition of Mockingjay published in 2014.
Chapter 1 Quotes

I use a technique one of the doctors suggested. I start with the simplest things I know to be true and work toward the more complicated. The list begins to roll in my head...
My name is Katniss Everdeen. I am seventeen years old. My home is District 12. I was in the Hunger Games. I escaped. The Capitol hates me. Peeta was taken prisoner. He is thought to be dead. Most likely he is dead. It is probably best if he is dead...

Related Characters: Katniss Everdeen (speaker), Peeta Mellark
Page Number: 4
Explanation and Analysis:

The third book of the Hunger Games trilogy shows Katniss Everdeen coping with trauma, paranoia, anxiety, and many other psychological problems. She's experienced brutal violence, and even witnessed some of her friends being killed in front of her. So one of the major questions of the novel is: how does (or doesn't) Katniss cope with her trauma?

In this quotation, Katniss shows us one way she's been coached to deal with her pain: listing the things she knows to be true. Such a technique helps Katniss in a number of different ways. First, it helps her distinguish between government propaganda and reality: while the difference might seem perfectly clear to readers, distinguishing between propaganda and truth is especially important for Katniss because she lives in a society where the government is constantly altering reality. Katniss's coping technique is also useful because it shows mental health and maturation as a progression from simple to complex: Katniss begins by listing simple truths, then uses this simple truths to reach a kind of "truce" with more traumatic realities. It's also worth noting that this quotation is a way for Collins to deliver some exposition: Katniss is coping with trauma, but she's also cluing in first-time readers to the events of the previous two books in the Hunger Games trilogy.

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Chapter 3 Quotes

"It's just...Peeta. I'm afraid if we do win, the rebels will execute him as a traitor.”
Prim thinks this over. "Katniss, I don't think you understand how important you are to the cause. Important people usually get what they want. If you want to keep Peeta safe from the rebels, you can."

Related Characters: Katniss Everdeen (speaker), Primrose (Prim) Everdeen (speaker), Peeta Mellark
Page Number: 34
Explanation and Analysis:

Katniss Everdeen's friend (and sometimes boyfriend) Peeta Mellark has been kidnapped by the Panem government in retaliation for Katniss's decision to join a group of rebels. Katniss tells Primrose, her little sister, that she's afraid that Peeta will be killed if the rebels win the war with the Capitol, since the Capitol has forced or brainwashed Peeta into making a series of anti-rebel propaganda videos. Although Prim is much younger than Katniss, she's remarkably perceptive—arguably more so than Katniss. Prim correctly points out that Katniss will be able to use her influence to keep Peeta alive.

Prim's argument is both wise and naive at the same time. She sees that Peeta will be kept alive because of his relationship to Katniss, but she wrongly assumes that Katniss has genuine power over the rebel leadership. The reality, Katniss later realizes, is that the rebels will keep Peeta alive, but not out of respect for Katniss—on the contrary, they'll keep him so that they have a way of controlling Katniss. Just like the Capitol itself, the rebels will try to manipulate Katniss into obedience. The fact that Katniss hasn't considered the rebels' course of action suggests that she still believes that the rebels are very different from the government of Panem, when in reality they're virtually the same. Furthermore, Katniss's unawareness that Peeta will be kept alive proves that she's also unaware of the extent of her own importance to the rebels.

Chapter 4 Quotes

The president allows a few moments of unrest, and then continues in her brisk fashion. Only now the words coming out of her mouth are news to me. "But in return for this unprecedented request, Soldier Everdeen has promised to devote herself to our cause. It follows that any deviance from her mission, in either motive or deed, will be viewed as a break in this agreement. The immunity would be terminated and the fate of the four victors determined by the law of District Thirteen. As would her own. Thank you." In other words, I step out of line and we're all dead.

Related Characters: Katniss Everdeen (speaker), President Alma Coin (speaker), Peeta Mellark
Page Number: 57
Explanation and Analysis:

Katniss has used her influence and power to strike up a bargain with President Alma Coin: Coin will spare the lives of Katniss's friends (including Peeta), in return for which Katniss will devote herself to the rebel cause. Katniss must earn her friends' lives by making propaganda videos and speaking out in favor of the rebels. Here, Coin confirms the bargain by announcing it to the rebels under her control: if Katniss breaks her promise, everyone in the alliance will know about it (and the same is true of Coin).

Coin's agreement with Katniss tells us a lot about Coin's personality, and about the style of government she favors. Much like her rival, President Snow, Coin wants to use Katniss as a political puppet—a famous, instantly recognizable symbol who can be manipulated to suit the needs of the rebel alliance. And much as President Snow pressured Katniss into obedience by threatening to hurt her friends, Alma Coin is now implicitly threatening Katniss in precisely the same way—a threat that Katniss understands perfectly.

Chapter 9 Quotes

I used to think the murderer was the creepiest guy imaginable. Now, with a couple of trips to the Hunger Games under my belt, I decide not to judge him without knowing more details. Maybe his lover was already sentenced to death and he was trying to make it easier. To let her know he'd be waiting. Or maybe he thought the place he was leaving her was really worse than death. Didn't I want to kill Peeta with that syringe to save him from the Capitol? Was that really my only option? Probably not, but I couldn't think of another at the time.

Related Characters: Katniss Everdeen (speaker), Peeta Mellark
Related Symbols: The Hanging Tree
Page Number: 126
Explanation and Analysis:

During the filming of one of her propaganda videos for the rebels, Katniss recalls a song she learned as a small child. In the song, a murderer calls out to his lover, asking her to join his side; ultimately, we realize that the man is dead, and wants his lover to join him in the afterlife. Although Katniss has known the song for many years, she begins to consider what it means and finds associations between the lyrics and her own life.

It's not clear whether Katniss associates herself with the murderer or the lover, but it's obvious that she sees a deep similarity between her relationship with Peeta—her lover, currently captured by the government—and the murderer's relationship with his lover. Like the murderer, Katniss (and for that matter, Peeta) is both romantic and deeply selfish. Much as the murderer wants his lover to join him in death, Katniss wants Peeta to "join her" in her state of misery and trauma, even if Peeta is better off in another state of mind. Coping with trauma, as Katniss has been attempting to do for some time now, can be challenging and often rather selfish: one wants a friend with whom to share the burden of pain. Katniss, who's witnessed murder and carnage, feels a deep bond of trust and intimacy with Peeta, because he's one of the few people who knows what she's going through.

Chapter 11 Quotes

Maybe this realization on my part is all Snow needs. Thinking that Peeta was in his possession and being tortured for rebel information was bad. But thinking that he's being tortured specifically to incapacitate me is unendurable. And it's under the weight of this revelation that I truly begin to break.

Related Characters: Katniss Everdeen (speaker), Peeta Mellark , President Coriolanus Snow
Page Number: 154
Explanation and Analysis:

Katniss knows that President Snow has kidnapped Peeta in order to control Katniss—Snow knows very well that Katniss has feelings for Peeta, and will do almost anything to keep Peeta safe. President Snow also knows that the best way to control Katniss is to keep Peeta alive; this way, he can threaten and pressure Katniss into obeying him. Even though Katniss knows exactly what President Snow is trying to do to her, her awareness of the matter changes nothing. Her emotional bond with Peeta is too strong, to the point where, even when she's fully conscious that she's being manipulated, she'll still obey Snow.

The quotation illustrates the emotional and psychological turmoil that Katniss goes through during the novel. As a major figure—indeed, a symbol—of the fight against the government, Katniss is a visible target for her opponents. A naturally compassionate, guilt-ridden person, Katniss blames herself for her friends' suffering, since the only reason her friends are being attacked and tortured is because of her fame. In short, the quotation shows Katniss cracking under the pressure of being a symbol of the rebellion.

Chapter 14 Quotes

It's only now that he's been corrupted that I can fully appreciate the real Peeta. Even more than I would've if he'd died. The kindness, the steadiness, the warmth that had an unexpected heat behind it. Outside of Prim, my mother, and Gale, how many people in the world love me unconditionally?

Related Characters: Katniss Everdeen (speaker), Peeta Mellark , Gale Hawthorne , Primrose (Prim) Everdeen , Katniss’s mother
Page Number: 195
Explanation and Analysis:

Peeta—previously one of Katniss's closest confidants and friends—has now been conditioned to kill Katniss, thanks to the government of Panem. Ironically, Peeta's murderousness new "self" helps Katniss appreciate his old personality even more: she's been so used to having Peeta to talk to about her trauma that his sudden change of character immediately registers.

As Katniss experiences more and more traumatic events—the deaths of children, the bombings of entire districts, etc.—it becomes increasingly important for her to talk to people who have experienced the same events. Peeta was one of Katniss's most important friends, in large part because he knew what Katniss was going through. Now that he's been programmed to hate Katniss, Katniss has no choice but to cope with tragedy on her own. As Snow surely intended, conditioning Peeta has wounded Katniss more deeply than a bomb or bullet ever could.

Chapter 16 Quotes

"Always."

In the twilight of morphling, Peeta whispers the word and I go searching for him. It's a gauzy, violet-tinted world, with no hard edges, and many places to hide. I push through cloudbanks, follow faint tracks, catch the scent of cinnamon, of dill. Once I feel his hand on my cheek and try to trap it, but it dissolves like mist through my fingers.

Related Characters: Katniss Everdeen (speaker), Peeta Mellark
Page Number: 218
Explanation and Analysis:

After being shot by an angry dissident, Katniss is rushed to the hospital in the rebel base and treated with strong painkillers. As she hallucinates and dreams, Katniss imagines herself talking to Peeta. In her dream, Peeta says the word "Always."

Katniss's hallucination tells us a lot about her state of mind. Clearly, she's still attracted to Peeta, in spite of the fact that he's been programmed to kill her; the sentimental tone and romantic imagery of the quotation (the violet-tinged world, for instance) clearly suggest romantic attraction and emotional closeness. At the same time, Katniss has a hard time imagining herself in a happy relationship with Peeta—even in her own imagination, she can't conceive of a world where their love doesn't "dissolve."

Chapter 17 Quotes

We spend a couple of hours quizzing each other on military terms. I visit my mother and Prim for a while. When I'm back in my compartment, showered, staring into the darkness, I finally ask, "Johanna, could you really hear him screaming?" "That was part of it," she says. "Like the jabberjays in the arena. Only it was real. And it didn't stop after an hour. Tick, tock." "Tick, tock," I whisper back. Roses. Wolf mutts. Tributes. Frosted dolphins. Friends. Mockingjays. Stylists. Me. Everything screams in my dreams tonight.

Related Characters: Katniss Everdeen (speaker), Johanna Mason (speaker), Peeta Mellark , Primrose (Prim) Everdeen , Katniss’s mother
Page Number: 245
Explanation and Analysis:

Johanna and Katniss prepare for their mission into the Capitol. To prepare for the mission, they're exposed to psychological stimuli designed to make them frightened and anxious (in another rather heartless move by the rebels). In the quotation, Johanna and Katniss discuss their hallucinations, referencing their common experiences in the Hunger Games. Katniss's depiction of her nightmares illustrates the irrational nature of trauma. There's no rhyme or reason in her recollections of violence: her flashbacks can't be rationalized or understood, just experienced again and again and again.

The passage shows Katniss bonding with a friend over trauma, pain, and fear. In part, Katniss is bonding with Johanna, a woman whom she never liked much, because Peeta isn't available for her. Katniss needs someone to talk to—preferably someone who understands the traumatic flashbacks she's been experiencing. Johanna, who's witnessed just as much violence as Katniss, is a natural choice.

Chapter 20 Quotes

"Don't trust them. Don't go back. Kill Peeta. Do what you came to do." What did he mean? Don't trust who? The rebels? Coin? The people looking at me right now? I won't go back, but he must know I can't just fire a bullet through Peeta's head. Can I? Should I? Did Boggs guess that what I really came to do is desert and kill Snow on my own? I can't work all of this out now, so I just decide to carry out the first two orders: to not trust anyone and to move deeper into the Capitol. But how can I justify this? Make them let me keep the Holo?

Related Characters: Katniss Everdeen (speaker), Peeta Mellark , President Alma Coin , President Coriolanus Snow , Boggs
Page Number: 282
Explanation and Analysis:

During the course of the rebel mission to infiltrate the Capitol, Boggs is killed by a bomb. His dying words, delivered to Katniss, are the ones related in this quotation. As might be expected, Katniss immediately decides not to follow Boggs's advice to kill Peeta—she still loves and values Peeta too much. Katniss is puzzled about what Boggs meant by "don't trust them," however—who is the "them" she isn't supposed to trust?

Katniss's confusion about the meaning of Boggs's dying words reminds us that Katniss doesn't really know who her own friends are. As the novel moves on, it becomes increasingly obvious that the people Katniss trusts, including Coin and Plutarch, have been manipulating her for their own ends. Even Gale, Katniss's lifelong friend, can't be totally trusted anymore, since he often callously ignores the value of human life. Katniss is a puppet, being cynically moved around Panem for the good of her supposed allies. It's a mark of how thoroughly Katniss has been manipulated that the "them" in Boggs's sentence could refer to dozens of people, both enemies and apparent allies.

Chapter 21 Quotes

I’d certainly simplify the problem of dealing with his homicidal episodes. I don't know if it's the pods, or the fear, or watching Boggs die, but I feel the arena all around me. It's as if I've never left, really. Once again I'm battling not only for my own survival but for Peeta's as well. How satisfying, how entertaining it would be for Snow to have me kill him. To have Peeta's death on my conscience for whatever is left of my life. "It's not about you," I say. "We're on a mission. And you're necessary to it." I look to the rest of the group. "Think we might find some food here?"

Related Characters: Katniss Everdeen (speaker), Peeta Mellark , President Coriolanus Snow , Boggs
Page Number: 291
Explanation and Analysis:

For not the first time in the novel, Katniss feels that she's being pulled back into the Hunger Games. This feeling demonstrates the extent of her trauma. Katniss has witnessed a lot of violence in this novel (not to mention its two prequels), and as Beetee says, frightening events are the hardest to forget. As a result, any new frights or surprises "trigger" flashbacks for Katniss—one death inevitably reminds her of all the deaths she's seen.

Part of Katniss's psychological torture stems from the fact that she knows very well that people are trying to torture her psychologically. Here, she's fully aware that Snow wants to weaken her by burdening her with the guilt of being responsible for Peeta's life. And yet Katniss's awareness of Snow's plan does nothing to make the plan less effective: she knows exactly how Snow is planning to torture her, and this makes her torture even worse. Despite this, she doesn't give in—she still clings to her compassion and humanity even in the face of such great horror, and she still refuses to kill Peeta.

Chapter 22 Quotes

"Can't help him!" Peeta starts shoving people forward. "Can't!" Amazingly, he's the only one still functional enough to get us moving. I don't know why he's in control, when he should be flipping out and bashing my brains in, but that could happen any second. At the pressure of his hand against my shoulder, I turn away from the grisly thing that was Messalla; I make my feet go forward, fast, so fast that I can barely skid to a stop before the next intersection.

Related Characters: Katniss Everdeen (speaker), Peeta Mellark (speaker), Messalla
Page Number: 308
Explanation and Analysis:

As they draw closer to the Capitol, Katniss and the rest of her team are ambushed by an army of mutts (genetically-bred government warriors). To Katniss's great surprise, however, Peeta  (who's previously been conditioned to attack Katniss at the smallest psychological provocation) isn't "set off" by the ambush. On the contrary, Peeta and Peeta alone remains calm in the midst of the crisis. The quotation is important because it suggests that trauma need not be psychologically crippling. Sometimes, the people who've endured the most trauma, such as Peeta and Katniss, are the calmest and most "put together" in times of danger. For an emotionally scarred warrior like Peeta, a surprise attack by mutts is the norm; barely even a surprise at all. Peeta's reaction to the attack also reminds Katniss of why she loves Peeta (when he's acting like his true self): they've been through the same traumas in the Hunger Games. Katniss, herself a role model for thousands, looks to Peeta as a role model for how to deal with pain and move forward.

Chapter 27 Quotes

Peeta and I grow back together. There are still moments when he clutches the back of a chair and hangs on until the flashbacks are over. I wake screaming from nightmares of mutts and lost children. But his arms are there to comfort me. And eventually his lips. On the night I feel that thing again, the hunger that overtook me on the beach, I know this would have happened anyway. That what I need to survive is not Gale's fire, kindled with rage and hatred. I have plenty of fire myself. What I need is the dandelion in the spring. The bright yellow that means rebirth instead of destruction. The promise that life can go on, no matter how bad our losses. That it can be good again. And only Peeta can give me that. So after, when he whispers, "You love me. Real or not real?" I tell him, "Real."

Related Characters: Katniss Everdeen (speaker), Peeta Mellark (speaker), Gale Hawthorne
Page Number: 388
Explanation and Analysis:

In the last passages of the Hunger Games Trilogy, Katniss informs us that she truly falls in love with and spends the rest of her life with Peeta. (In this passage, she vaguely describes the first time they have sex.) Katniss chooses to marry Peeta because they have so much in common: even if Katniss hasn't known Peeta for as long as she's known Gale (the other vertex of the "love triangle"), Peeta intuitively understands the person Katniss has become—a traumatized, emotionally scarred woman—and he has the compassion, empathy, and common experience to help her.

Katniss's parting thoughts about Peeta suggest that she's turned her back on the principle of "an eye for an eye." For months, she believed that her trauma would go away if she could avenge her loved ones' deaths. But as the novel comes to an end, Katniss comes to realize that revenge solves nothing—she'll always feel the pain of her sister's death, no matter who she kills.

For his part, Peeta also finds a true partner in Katniss, and they "grow together." The final lines of this passage recall the game Peeta used to play after he was brainwashed by the Capitol: a game to clarify what is and isn't "real." Now that game becomes a romantic line for Peeta, but it also suggests that Katniss is the central aspect of his new life and reality: he needs her as much as she needs him.

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Peeta Mellark Character Timeline in Mockingjay

The timeline below shows where the character Peeta Mellark appears in Mockingjay. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1
Trauma and Love Theme Icon
...she escaped from the Games; the Capitol views her as an enemy; her dear friend Peeta was captured by the government, and he may be dead. (full context)
The Power and Danger of Symbols Theme Icon
Role-Playing, Authenticity, Television, and the Self Theme Icon
Trauma and Love Theme Icon
As Katniss thinks about Peeta, her best friend, Gale, calls her over the headset she’s wearing. Gale asks Katniss if... (full context)
Revolution and Its Problems Theme Icon
The Power and Danger of Symbols Theme Icon
Role-Playing, Authenticity, Television, and the Self Theme Icon
Trauma and Love Theme Icon
...follow a precise script. Yesterday, Katniss overheard Coin saying that the rebels should have rescued Peeta instead of Katniss—he would have been a better figurehead. (full context)
Chapter 2
Revolution and Its Problems Theme Icon
The Power and Danger of Symbols Theme Icon
Role-Playing, Authenticity, Television, and the Self Theme Icon
...Coin, and the other leaders, staring at a television. The screen shows an interview between Peeta and Caesar Flickerman, the Capitol’s resident reporter and interviewer. Peeta informs Flickerman of his actions... (full context)
Revolution and Its Problems Theme Icon
The Power and Danger of Symbols Theme Icon
Peeta continues describing the final moments of the Hunger Games. Katniss fired an arrow at the... (full context)
Revolution and Its Problems Theme Icon
The Power and Danger of Symbols Theme Icon
Role-Playing, Authenticity, Television, and the Self Theme Icon
Compassion, Callousness, and Revenge Theme Icon
Flickerman’s interview with Peeta concludes with Peeta tiredly asking for a cease-fire between rebels and government troops, on the... (full context)
Revolution and Its Problems Theme Icon
The Power and Danger of Symbols Theme Icon
Role-Playing, Authenticity, Television, and the Self Theme Icon
Compassion, Callousness, and Revenge Theme Icon
Katniss is secretly overjoyed to know that Peeta is still alive—nevertheless, she senses that the rebel leaders regard Peeta as a traitor to... (full context)
Chapter 3
Revolution and Its Problems Theme Icon
The Power and Danger of Symbols Theme Icon
Compassion, Callousness, and Revenge Theme Icon
...Katniss performs her “relaxation exercise,” telling herself that her name is Katniss Everdeen, her friend Peeta is alive, and he’s a traitor, but she must keep Peeta alive. Just as she’s... (full context)
Revolution and Its Problems Theme Icon
The Power and Danger of Symbols Theme Icon
...can respond, Plutarch suggests that the rebel leaders “continue the current romance” between Katniss and Peeta, and pretend that Gale is Katniss’s cousin. This is exactly the tactic that Capitol reporters... (full context)
Revolution and Its Problems Theme Icon
The Power and Danger of Symbols Theme Icon
Compassion, Callousness, and Revenge Theme Icon
...allow Gale to assist her, she moves on to her next condition. Katniss asks that Peeta, along with two other rebels in the government’s control, Enobaria and Johanna, be pardoned if... (full context)
Chapter 4
Revolution and Its Problems Theme Icon
The Power and Danger of Symbols Theme Icon
Trauma and Love Theme Icon
...Coin telling the crowd that Katniss has agreed to be mockingjay, on the condition that Peeta, Johanna, Annie, and Enobaria are granted immunity. Boos and jeers greet this news, and Katniss... (full context)
Chapter 5
Revolution and Its Problems Theme Icon
The Power and Danger of Symbols Theme Icon
...also nutritious and nourishing. Yesterday, Gale and Katniss had argued about Katniss’s decision to grant Peeta immunity. Gale argued that Katniss didn’t know if Peeta—or, for that matter, Johanna or Enobaria—were... (full context)
Chapter 6
Compassion, Callousness, and Revenge Theme Icon
...cause. The last time Katniss saw Haymitch, she was so angry with him for abandoning Peeta in the Hunger Games that she scratched his face. Hearing his voice, she leaves the... (full context)
Revolution and Its Problems Theme Icon
The Power and Danger of Symbols Theme Icon
Role-Playing, Authenticity, Television, and the Self Theme Icon
...Haymitch—she was only capable of making grand speeches and “working” crowds earlier because she had Peeta to help her. (full context)
Revolution and Its Problems Theme Icon
The Power and Danger of Symbols Theme Icon
Role-Playing, Authenticity, Television, and the Self Theme Icon
...mourned the death of Rue, a contestant in the first Hunger Games; when she saved Peeta’s life. Gale realizes what Haymitch is getting at—Katniss is at her most charismatic when she... (full context)
Revolution and Its Problems Theme Icon
The Power and Danger of Symbols Theme Icon
Role-Playing, Authenticity, Television, and the Self Theme Icon
Compassion, Callousness, and Revenge Theme Icon
Trauma and Love Theme Icon
...this idea, reasoning that they can spread word that Katniss, who is supposedly pregnant with Peeta’s child, has had a miscarriage. Coin seems to like the idea of sending Katniss out... (full context)
Compassion, Callousness, and Revenge Theme Icon
Trauma and Love Theme Icon
...herself from saying what she’s been thinking all along: she’s furious with Haymitch for letting Peeta be captured. Haymitch replies that he can’t believe Katniss let Peeta out of her sight... (full context)
Chapter 8
Revolution and Its Problems Theme Icon
The Power and Danger of Symbols Theme Icon
Role-Playing, Authenticity, Television, and the Self Theme Icon
Trauma and Love Theme Icon
...surprised to find that the Capitol is showing a new interview between Caesar Flickerman and Peeta. Katniss notes with horror that Peeta is gaunt and tired-looking, even if the TV producers... (full context)
Revolution and Its Problems Theme Icon
The Power and Danger of Symbols Theme Icon
Role-Playing, Authenticity, Television, and the Self Theme Icon
Trauma and Love Theme Icon
Flickerman asks Peeta what he thinks of Katniss’s actions in District 8. Peeta replies that the rebels are... (full context)
Revolution and Its Problems Theme Icon
The Power and Danger of Symbols Theme Icon
Role-Playing, Authenticity, Television, and the Self Theme Icon
Trauma and Love Theme Icon
Katniss is shocked and surprised by Peeta’s interview—it seems that he’s cooperating with the Capitol. At the same time, she acknowledges that... (full context)
Chapter 9
Revolution and Its Problems Theme Icon
The Power and Danger of Symbols Theme Icon
Role-Playing, Authenticity, Television, and the Self Theme Icon
It’s the night after Peeta’s interview with Flickerman, and Katniss finds it impossible to sleep in her hospital bed. The... (full context)
Revolution and Its Problems Theme Icon
The Power and Danger of Symbols Theme Icon
Trauma and Love Theme Icon
...with Finnick, Katniss returns to her housing and eats dinner with Gale. He doesn’t mention Peeta at all. Katniss worries that her actions as the Mockingjay have made President Snow even... (full context)
Revolution and Its Problems Theme Icon
Role-Playing, Authenticity, Television, and the Self Theme Icon
...videos with her TV crew. Katniss realizes that she’s furious with Gale for not mentioning Peeta’s interview to her—she knows that he’s seen it, and is trying to hide it from... (full context)
Compassion, Callousness, and Revenge Theme Icon
Trauma and Love Theme Icon
...worries that she’s losing her bond of trust and affection with Gale—by failing to mention Peeta, he broke her trust. Nevertheless, Katniss resolves to continue being friends with Gale, as she... (full context)
The Power and Danger of Symbols Theme Icon
Role-Playing, Authenticity, Television, and the Self Theme Icon
Compassion, Callousness, and Revenge Theme Icon
Trauma and Love Theme Icon
...Command—there is a meeting. In Command, Katniss finds the rebel leaders watching another interview with Peeta. Peeta is standing with President Snow, explaining to a huge crowd that a cease-fire between... (full context)
Revolution and Its Problems Theme Icon
The Power and Danger of Symbols Theme Icon
Role-Playing, Authenticity, Television, and the Self Theme Icon
The television switches back to Peeta, who’s still standing with Snow. Peeta is asked if he has any words for Katniss.... (full context)
Chapter 10
Revolution and Its Problems Theme Icon
The Power and Danger of Symbols Theme Icon
Role-Playing, Authenticity, Television, and the Self Theme Icon
Katniss has just seen Peeta being savagely beaten on live television. The rebel leaders sitting around her are more concerned... (full context)
The Power and Danger of Symbols Theme Icon
Trauma and Love Theme Icon
...how she’s “managing,” and Katniss, eager to have someone to talk to, tells Prim about Peeta. When Katniss has finished, Prim replies that President Snow won’t kill Peeta—without Peeta, Snow will... (full context)
Chapter 11
The Power and Danger of Symbols Theme Icon
Trauma and Love Theme Icon
...time, Katniss wonders how President Snow will try to manipulate her in the future. With Peeta alive, Katniss realizes, President Snow has an invaluable tool for making Katniss obey him. Furthermore,... (full context)
The Power and Danger of Symbols Theme Icon
Trauma and Love Theme Icon
...to the adjacent room, which belongs to Finnick Odair. She tells him her theory about Peeta. Finnick realizes that Snow is probably trying something similar with Annie, one of the only... (full context)
Revolution and Its Problems Theme Icon
The Power and Danger of Symbols Theme Icon
Trauma and Love Theme Icon
...any act of heroism she performs will only result in more torture and punishment for Peeta. (full context)
Revolution and Its Problems Theme Icon
The Power and Danger of Symbols Theme Icon
Role-Playing, Authenticity, Television, and the Self Theme Icon
Compassion, Callousness, and Revenge Theme Icon
Trauma and Love Theme Icon
...her earlier “performances” as the Mockingjay. Finnick explains that Katniss knows that Snow is using Peeta to blackmail her. Katniss begins to sob—suddenly, someone (it’s not revealed who) injects Katniss with... (full context)
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...before her. Haymitch explains that Plutarch has decided to put together a crew to rescue Peeta from the Capitol. The volunteers for this dangerous mission include Boggs, and—much to Katniss’s displeasure—Gale. (full context)
Chapter 12
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Having just learned from Haymitch that Gale has volunteered to rescue Peeta from the Capitol, Katniss is terrified that she’ll lose both of her close friends at... (full context)
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...agrees, and the two of them begin shooting short interviews in which Katniss talks about Peeta. In one of these interviews, Katniss sarcastically thanks President Snow for encouraging her to declare... (full context)
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...Katniss next hears shouts of “Finnick”—Annie has been freed from her prison. Finally, Katniss sees Peeta, lying in a hospital bed. She’s overjoyed to see him, even though he’s clearly in... (full context)
Chapter 13
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Katniss has been confined to the hospital following Peeta’s sudden, unexpected attempt to strangle her. It was Boggs, Katniss thinks, who saved her life... (full context)
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...the hospital, Beetee approaches her, apologizing for her near brush with death. He explains that Peeta has been subjected to a horrible form of torture in which he’s been conditioned to... (full context)
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...her in her home, and suggests that they use a novel strategy to communicate with Peeta. There is a young woman named Delly, a childhood friend of both Katniss and Peeta,... (full context)
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Delly goes to the hospital, where Peeta is staying, while Haymitch and Katniss watch from behind an observation window where they can’t... (full context)
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Having heard Peeta scream about her, Katniss feels both furious and guilty. While she realizes that Peeta has... (full context)
Chapter 14
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As Katniss proceeds with her mission, she’s informed of Peeta’s rehabilitation. Very slowly, he’s being trained to fight his conditioning. Plutarch tells Katniss that Prim... (full context)
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...through District 2 with Gale. Gale tells Katniss that he is no longer jealous of Peeta—-on the contrary, he feels sorry for Peeta for everything he’s gone through. As he explains... (full context)
Chapter 15
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...with Boggs, she hears a voice in her earpiece—it is Haymitch. Haymitch tells Katniss that Peeta has made a great leap forward in his rehabilitation—he’s been exposed to footage of Katniss... (full context)
Chapter 16
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The chapter begins with Peeta saying the word, “Always.” Katniss searches for Peeta—but it’s not revealed when or where. Gradually,... (full context)
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Shortly after the wedding, Katniss visits Peeta in his cell, where he’s being slowly trained to fight his fear of Katniss. When... (full context)
Chapter 17
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...aim, talking with each other about the other contestants in the most recent Hunger Games. Peeta, they agree, is getting better and overcoming his government conditioning. They’re joined by other mission... (full context)
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One night, the trainees, including Finnick, Gale, Katniss, Johanna, and Delly, have dinner with Peeta. Peeta is improving, but he still requires a guard’s supervision to spend time with his... (full context)
Chapter 18
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In the days following her meal with Peeta, Katniss devotes herself to training for her mission to the Capitol. She learns military tactics,... (full context)
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As Katniss plans to steal the Holo, she’s surprised to find that Peeta has arrived outside the Capitol, sent by President Coin herself. Katniss wonders why Coin would... (full context)
Chapter 19
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Peeta has just joined Katniss’s mission, stationed outside the Capitol. Boggs, the leader of Katniss’s branch... (full context)
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At dinner, Gale asks Katniss if she’s prepared to kill Peeta in the event that he attacks her again. He adds that he knows Katniss is... (full context)
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...is required to take watch outside the rebels’ camp. She’s joined, to her surprise, by Peeta. Peeta tells Katniss that he doesn’t know who to trust anymore—in response, Finnick walks out... (full context)
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...purposes. Afterwards, Katniss sees that Jackson, a rebel soldier, has been playing a game with Peeta called “Real or Not Real.” In this game, Peeta names something he remembers, and Jackson... (full context)
Chapter 20
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...yells for the group to retreat. Suddenly, Katniss hears a yell: she turns and sees Peeta running toward her. The noise and confusion have retriggered his Capitol conditioning, meaning that he... (full context)
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As the soldiers try to carry Peeta away, Katniss, Jackson, and the others stagger toward a nearby building. Katniss passes Boggs, who... (full context)
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...the Holo. Unexpectedly, Cressida speaks out—she says that Katniss is telling the truth. Coin sent Peeta to Katniss, Cressida explains, because Peeta knows where Snow’s personal residence is—he can lead Katniss... (full context)
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...A few members of the team, including Pollux, a young citizen of District 13, carry Peeta, who is still knocked out. They set out toward the center of the Capitol. As... (full context)
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Katniss asks the group what to do next. To her surprise, the answer comes from Peeta, who has just regained consciousness. He whispers, “Our next move…is to kill me.” (full context)
Chapter 21
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Peeta has just requested that the mission kill him. He’s a danger to Katniss, he argues,... (full context)
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...There they find food and water, and everyone has dinner. The soldiers are leery of Peeta. He is handcuffed, and at least three soldiers are required to watch him at all... (full context)
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...highly dangerous, the best course of action is to proceed underground through mines and tunnels. Peeta again insists that he should be shot, as he’s a danger to the mission. While... (full context)
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...beneath the Capitol. Pollux explains that his brother worked in the tunnels for many years. Peeta finds this news very encouraging, and Katniss notices a brief “flash “ of his former... (full context)
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Katniss notices that Peeta is having trouble proceeding through the tunnel, due to his conditioning and the injuries he’s... (full context)
Chapter 22
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...probably underneath his city. Katniss is afraid that the sound of her name will retrigger Peeta, but to her surprise, he isn’t hostile at all. Instead, he urges Katniss to leave... (full context)
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...guns at Katniss and her team. Jackson stays behind to fight the mutts, while Gale, Peeta, and Katniss run away. Katniss notes, impressed, that Peeta seems to be the calmest and... (full context)
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Katniss, Gale, Peeta, and Cressida run away from the mutts through the tunnels. They find a ladder leading... (full context)
Chapter 23
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Tigris helps the group take care of Gale’s neck injury. As Peeta and Katniss care for him, Peeta recalls Katniss risking her life to find him medicine... (full context)
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...wanted an excuse to do it. Jackson agreed to Katniss’s plan because Jackson trusted Boggs. Peeta agrees with Gale, and points out that Tigris’s shop is only five blocks from Snow’s... (full context)
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...to infiltrate Snow’s mansion. At the end of the day, she overhears a conversation between Peeta and Gale. They are talking about Katniss. Peeta insists that Katniss loves Gale, while Gale... (full context)
Chapter 24
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Katniss is shocked and hurt by what she’s just heard Gale tell Peeta about her. Gale has implied that Katniss acts out of cold calculation, not love, and... (full context)
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...and the rest of the mission with elaborate clothes that conceal their weapons—bows and arrows. Peeta praises her designs, and Tigris blushes with pride. The group thanks Tigris and leaves her... (full context)
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...and Peacekeepers have been summoned to suppress it. In the confusion, Katniss loses sight of Peeta, Cressida, and Pollux. She and Gale run away from the riot. (full context)
Chapter 26
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Katniss remembers that Coin sent Peeta to accompany Katniss into battle, knowing that this decision would endanger Katniss. She also must... (full context)
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...is present, along with the surviving Hunger Games participants: Enobaria, Johanna, Beetee, Annie, Haymitch, and Peeta. Beetee explains that the Hunger Games competitors were, for the most part, killed off: all... (full context)
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...they punish the Capitol by forcing their children to compete in a final Hunger Games. Peeta angrily opposes this idea, calling it cruel. Annie agrees with Peeta, as does Beetee. Johanna... (full context)
Chapter 27
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...her shoulder—which contains a poisonous pill—and tries to bite into it. Before she can, however, Peeta’s hand blocks her—“I can’t let you go,” he tells her. (full context)
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...that have been built for them. The next few days are slow and uneventful. Then Peeta returns to District 12. He explains that the government wants nothing more to do with... (full context)
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...bitterly, that the “old Katniss” would have loved to go hunting. Now that she and Peeta can live in District 12 in peace, they “learn to keep busy together.” Katniss begins... (full context)
Epilogue
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...Under the new government, headed by Paylor, the Hunger Games have been abolished. Katniss and Peeta have two young children: one boy and one girl. In school, they learn about their... (full context)
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...Games, and the deaths of her loved ones. To console herself, she spends time with Peeta, who is sympathetic and supportive, and privately she makes a list of every good act... (full context)