Montana 1948

Pdf fan dd71f526917d6085d66d045bd94fb5b55d02a108dd45d836cbdd4abe2d4c043d Tap here to download this LitChart! (PDF)

Grandpa Hayden (Julian) Character Analysis

Grandpa Hayden is a bigoted and potentially violent man who favors his son Frank over his other son Wesley. He knows about Frank’s abuse of Sioux women, but his only concern is that Frank will father a non-white child. He is furious when Wesley arrests Frank, not because he believes that Frank is innocent but rather because he considers the crimes, perpetrated as they were against “Indians,” to be unimportant. He is a very powerful man in Mercer County, and Grandpa Julian’s influence is one of the main reasons Wesley believes Frank will never be convicted of his crimes.

Grandpa Hayden (Julian) Quotes in Montana 1948

The Montana 1948 quotes below are all either spoken by Grandpa Hayden (Julian) or refer to Grandpa Hayden (Julian). For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Law versus Justice Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Milkweed Editions edition of Montana 1948 published in 1993.
Chapter 1 Quotes

The sheriff of Mercer County was elected, but such was my grandfather’s popularity and influence—and the weight of the Hayden name—that it was enough for my grandfather to say…now I want my son to have this job…It would never have occurred to my father to refuse.

Related Characters: David Hayden (speaker), Wesley Hayden, Grandpa Hayden (Julian)
Page Number: 9
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, David explains that his family is, essentially, Montana royalty. David's grandfather, Julian Hayden, is a well-known figure, prosperous and well-respected. As a result, David's father, Wesley, has a lot to live up to: he wants to impress his father and honor the Hayden name. Thus, when Julian pulls some strings to ensure that Wesley will become the next sheriff, Wesley has to accept: he doesn't want to disappoint his dad.

The passage shows the first hints of corruption in town. For now, the corruption is pretty "standard," just some "good ole boy" nepotism (a father getting his son a good job, but potentially ousting others who were more qualified). And yet the passage shows signs of a tension in the Hayden family: Wesley is loyal and indebted to his family, but he also seems to resent his father telling him what to do at all times. Deliberately, Watson doesn't tell us right away what the crime in Montana was--he leaves us to guess. For now, it seems possible that the crime might have had something to do with Wesley and his father.

A+

Unlock explanations and citation info for this and every other Montana 1948 quote.

Plus so much more...

Get LitCharts A+
Already a LitCharts A+ member? Sign in!
Chapter 2 Quotes

“You know what your granddad said it means to be a peace officer in Montana? He said it means knowing when to look and when to look away.”

Related Characters: Len McAuley (speaker), David Hayden, Grandpa Hayden (Julian)
Page Number: 84
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, David has a strange encounter with Wesley’s deputy, an old, recovering alcoholic named Len. Len is a loyal follower of Wesley’s father, Julian—at times, he seems more loyal to Julian than to Wesley himself. Here, Len repeats for David a lesson that Julian has often given Len: being a law enforcement officer means knowing “when to look and when to look away.” In other words, it’s implied, Julian thinks that police officers should be able to take the law into their own hands—choosing when and when not to dole out justice.

We’ve already seen that Julian is willing to bend the law to suit his own family’s needs. But here, it’s suggested that Julian might even be willing to ignore his son Frank’s horrific, serious crimes, simply because Frank is his favorite sun. Julian subscribes to an unfair, biased interpretation of justice, in which family loyalties, economic power, and racial prejudices are more important than the law itself.

Chapter 3 Quotes

I suddenly felt sorry for my father—not as he stood before me at that moment, but as a boy. What must it have been like to have a father capable of speaking to you like that?

Related Characters: David Hayden (speaker), Wesley Hayden, Grandpa Hayden (Julian)
Page Number: 108
Explanation and Analysis:

In this chapter, Wesley faces his parents’ fury when he suggests that their son is a molester, and should be in jail for his crimes. Here, Wesley’s father, Julian, yells at him, furious that Wesley is attacking Julian’s favorite son, Frank. David is sorry that Wesley had to grow up in a house in which Julian was such a harsh, prejudiced master: Wesley must have endured a lot of verbal abuse over the years.

The passage shows that David is becoming more mature: he’s beginning to put himself in other people’s shoes and see the world from their point of view. By recognizing that even his father used to be a child, David asserts his own wisdom, and ceases to be a child himself.

“Screwing an Indian. Or feeling her up or whatever. You don’t lock up a man for that. You don’t lock up your brother. A respected man. A war hero.”

Related Characters: Grandpa Hayden (Julian) (speaker), Wesley Hayden, Frank Hayden
Page Number: 112
Explanation and Analysis:

Here, David eavesdrops on his grandfather Julian as he verbally abuses Wesley, David’s father. Wesley is suggesting to Julian that Frank—who’s always been the favorite child—should be sent to prison for molesting his Native American patients. Julian doesn’t deny that Frank has molested some Native American women; he simply says that such actions aren’t really crimes at all.

Put bluntly: Julian is an openly racist character—someone who doesn’t consider Native Americans “real” Americans, or even real humans, deserving of basic dignity and rights. Thus, he lashes out at Wesley for suggesting that Frank is anything other than a great man. Julian argues that Wesley shouldn’t arrest his own brother—and yet Frank, in spite of being Wesley’s brother, is a vile criminal, and deserves to be locked up. One wonders how much of Wesley’s motivation for arresting his brother is an abstract respect for the law and how much is his desire to assert his independence from his own family and his overbearing, racist father.

Get the entire Montana 1948 LitChart as a printable PDF.
Montana 1948.pdf.medium

Grandpa Hayden (Julian) Character Timeline in Montana 1948

The timeline below shows where the character Grandpa Hayden (Julian) appears in Montana 1948. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1
Law versus Justice Theme Icon
Family and Loyalty Theme Icon
Identity Theme Icon
David tries to explain his mother’s thinking. Grandpa Julian Hayden (Wesley’s father) had once been Sheriff of Mercer county for many terms, along... (full context)
Family and Loyalty Theme Icon
Identity Theme Icon
Growing Up Theme Icon
...Wesley is dull in comparison to Frank, who is favored by everyone in town including Grandpa Hayden, who sometimes speaks of Frank as though he is his only son. David remembers... (full context)
Law versus Justice Theme Icon
Family and Loyalty Theme Icon
...God with because he used up all his faith and loyalty on his “earthly father,” Grandpa Hayden. (full context)
Chapter 2
Family and Loyalty Theme Icon
The following Sunday, David and his parents are on their way to Grandpa Hayden’s house. Gail and Wesley had fought about going—Gail hadn’t wanted to accept the invitation... (full context)
Family and Loyalty Theme Icon
When they arrive at Grandpa’s house, Frank’s car is already parked out front. The house is large and expensively decorated... (full context)
Racism, Prejudice, and the American West Theme Icon
Grandpa Hayden greets them in a traditional western shirt and a cowboy boots. When David sees... (full context)
Law versus Justice Theme Icon
Family and Loyalty Theme Icon
Racism, Prejudice, and the American West Theme Icon
David hears his father ask Grandpa Hayden if he has a minute to talk about Frank. David has the brief hope... (full context)
Family and Loyalty Theme Icon
Racism, Prejudice, and the American West Theme Icon
Growing Up Theme Icon
...has heard his Grandfather say something about Frank and Native American girls. At Frank’s wedding, Grandpa Hayden had said “now he’s got a good-looking white woman for a wife. That better... (full context)
Law versus Justice Theme Icon
Racism, Prejudice, and the American West Theme Icon
...watching over Marie, whose condition has improved remarkably. David tells Marie about hunting coyotes at Grandpa’s, and she remarks that coyotes are hard to find when you’re looking for them. These... (full context)
Law versus Justice Theme Icon
Growing Up Theme Icon
...wagon for many years. He tells David to sit down, and says to him that Grandpa Hayden always told him that being deputy sheriff in this town means knowing when to... (full context)
Chapter 3
Family and Loyalty Theme Icon
Growing Up Theme Icon
That night Grandpa and Grandma Hayden come to the house demanding to know where Frank is (Gloria has... (full context)
Family and Loyalty Theme Icon
Racism, Prejudice, and the American West Theme Icon
...sent upstairs but he listens to the conversation through an air vent in the kitchen. Julian demands to know why Wesley would throw Frank in jail for “beating up some Indian.”... (full context)
Growing Up Theme Icon
Julian tells Wesley to “stop this before I have to.” Wesley does not respond. Grandma Hayden... (full context)
Family and Loyalty Theme Icon
Identity Theme Icon
Growing Up Theme Icon
...employees, Dale Paris, in the truck, and thinks the other men are also employees of Grandpa Hayden. He tells his mother and she gets worried, and tells him to call his... (full context)
Epilogue
Law versus Justice Theme Icon
Family and Loyalty Theme Icon
Identity Theme Icon
Growing Up Theme Icon
...best, as Frank had never been proven guilty in a court of law. Wesley and Grandpa Hayden did not speak to each other at the funeral, nor after. Wesley agreed with... (full context)
Family and Loyalty Theme Icon
Growing Up Theme Icon
Len and Grandpa Hayden have both died of strokes—David wonders if the strokes were caused by their keeping... (full context)