Purple Hibiscus

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Jaja (Chukwuka Achike) Character Analysis

Kambili’s older brother, a seventeen-year-old who is also quiet but an excellent student. Jaja feels guilty about being unable to protect Kambili and Mama from Papa. In Nsukka he discovers a passion for gardening, and he quickly feels more at home with Aunty Ifeoma than with Papa. Jaja then acts more openly rebellious than Kambili, challenging Papa and abandoning his Catholic faith. At the same time he grows more distant from Kambili. He later takes responsibility for Mama’s crime and is imprisoned for three years.

Jaja (Chukwuka Achike) Quotes in Purple Hibiscus

The Purple Hibiscus quotes below are all either spoken by Jaja (Chukwuka Achike) or refer to Jaja (Chukwuka Achike). For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Colonialism and Nigerian Politics Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Algonquin Books edition of Purple Hibiscus published in 2012.
Chapter 1 Quotes

I waited for him to ask Jaja and me to take a sip, as he always did. A love sip, he called it, because you shared the little things you loved with the people you loved. Have a love sip, he would say, and Jaja would go first. Then I would hold the cup with both hands and raise it to my lips. One sip. The tea was always too hot, always burned my tongue, and if lunch was something peppery, my raw tongue suffered. But it didn’t matter, because I knew that when the tea burned my tongue, it burned Papa’s love into me.

Related Characters: Kambili Achike (speaker), Jaja (Chukwuka Achike), Papa (Eugene Achike)
Page Number: 8
Explanation and Analysis:

In this symbolically loaded passage, we witness Kambili, the heroine of the novel, waiting to sip a cup of her Papa's hot tea with her brother, Jaja. Kambili and Jaja are used to these "love sips," and in fact they look forward to them, as they seem to prove their Papa's love for them. The ritual is so much a part of Kambili's life that she associates her father's love itself with hot tea: they're both (supposedly) good for her, even if they hurt her in the short term.

We have yet to witness the full extent of Papa's violence to his family, but for now, the pain of hot tea foreshadows Papa's abusive behavior, and how closely connected this violence is with his children's persistent love for and worship of him. Perhaps subconsciously, he uses the hot tea ritual to teach his children that he beats them because he loves them.

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Papa was staring pointedly at Jaja. “Jaja, have you not shared a drink with us, gbo? Have you no words in your mouth?” he asked, entirely in Igbo. A bad sign. He hardly spoke Igbo, and although Jaja and I spoke it with Mama at home, he did not like us to speak it in public. We had to sound civilized in public, he told us; we had to speak English. Papa’s sister, Aunty Ifeoma, said once that Papa was too much of a colonial product. She had said this about Papa in a mild, forgiving way, as if it were not Papa’s fault…
Mba, there are no words in my mouth,” Jaja replied.
“What?” There was a shadow clouding Papa’s eyes, a shadow that had been in Jaja’s eyes. Fear. It had left Jaja’s eyes and entered Papa’s.
“I have nothing to say,” Jaja said.

Related Characters: Papa (Eugene Achike) (speaker), Kambili Achike, Jaja (Chukwuka Achike)
Page Number: 13
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Papa--who has just made his family members try his company's new batch of cashew juice--notices that his son, Jaja, is conspicuously silent. Jaja seems to finally be standing up to his abusive, tyrannical father by refusing to parrot the usual praise that is expected of him.

We will see that Kambili and Jaja are known for their silence and obedience, but here Jaja starts to turn that silence into a weapon against Papa--by refusing to even speak to Papa, Jaja robs his father of some of his power.

The ideas of speech and silence here are also heavily influenced by Nigeria's colonial history. Papa's sister Ifeoma (whom we have yet to meet) is the only one who really tells it like it is about Papa, and calls him a "colonial product"--he has internalized the colonialist mindset that whiteness and Westernness always equals superiority. Thus Papa always speaks English, and wants his children to as well--he sees English as naturally superior to Igbo. Papa's slip into Igbo in this scene, then, is a sign of his sudden anger and desperation. He feels his son slipping away from him, and he simultaneously loses some of the tyrannical power of the English language over its Nigerian "subjects."

I lay in bed after Mama left and let my mind rake through the past, through the years when Jaja and Mama and I spoke more with our spirits than with our lips. Until Nsukka. Nsukka started it all; Aunty Ifeoma’s little garden next to the verandah of her flat in Nsukka began to lift the silence. Jaja’s defiance seemed to me now like Aunty Ifeoma’s experimental purple hibiscus: rare, fragrant with the undertones of freedom, a different kind of freedom from the one the crowds waving green leaves chanted at Government Square after the coup. A freedom to be, to do.

Related Characters: Kambili Achike (speaker), Jaja (Chukwuka Achike), Mama (Beatrice Achike), Aunty Ifeoma
Related Symbols: The Purple Hibiscus
Page Number: 15-16
Explanation and Analysis:

As the first chapter draws to a close, we're introduced to the basic structure of the novel, as well as its dominant motif. The novel will be narrated in flashback, so that by the end, we'll fully understand why Papa broke Mama's figurines, and how their family came to be so divided. Furthermore, Adichie introduces us to the purple hibiscus that will come to stand for the characters' sense of freedom and creativity--a freedom that can't be destroyed by repressive parents or governors, try as they might.

The purple hibiscus, Kambili tells us, is free and "experimental"--a sure sign of its symbolic meaning. It's worth noting that although Kambili is seemingly under her father's thumb--living in his house, ex.--in her mind she's now free of his influence.  By the same token, the hibiscus seems to be powerless and domestic, when in reality it's secretly wild and free.

Chapter 5 Quotes

“They are always so quiet,” he said, turning to Papa. “So quiet.”
“They are not like those loud children people are raising these days, with no home training and no fear of God,” Papa said, and I was certain that it was pride that stretched Papa’s lips and tightened his eyes.
“Imagine what the Standard would be if we were all quiet.”
It was a joke. Ade Coker was laughing; so was his wife, Yewanda. But Papa did not laugh. Jaja and I turned and went back upstairs, silently.

Related Characters: Kambili Achike (speaker), Papa (Eugene Achike) (speaker), Ade Coker (speaker), Jaja (Chukwuka Achike), Yewande Coker
Page Number: 58
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Papa talks with his friend and business partner Ade Coker about child-rearing policies. Ade points out that Papa's children, including Kambili, are always very quiet--to the point where they never make a sound in public. Papa is clearly very proud of his children; he thinks that his violent parenting methods are justified, since by beating his children they'll be calm and well-behaved at all times (not like other children "these days". Ade points out the strange contradiction in Papa's life: he's a political advocate who uses journalism and his voice (the Standard) to criticize the existing political leadership in Nigeria. And yet Papa tolerates no such criticism or debate at home: in short, he's a personal tyrant who challenges political tyrants. Papa's behavior suggests that in his home life, he's more interested in power and control than in doing the right thing: he's willing to use journalism to fight for political freedom, but he refuses to see that beating and silencing his children isn't a good or virtuous thing to do.

“Ifeoma could not afford it.” Papa-Nnukwu shook his head. “Since the father of her children died, she has seen hard times. But she will bring them this year. You will see them. It is not right that you don’t know them well, your cousins. It is not right.”
Jaja and I said nothing. We did not know Aunty Ifeoma or her children very well because she and Papa had quarreled about Papa-Nnukwu. Mama told us. Aunty Ifeoma stopped speaking to Papa after he barred Papa-Nnukwu from coming to his house, and a few years passed before they finally started speaking to each other.

Related Characters: Kambili Achike (speaker), Papa-Nnukwu (speaker), Jaja (Chukwuka Achike), Papa (Eugene Achike), Mama (Beatrice Achike), Aunty Ifeoma
Page Number: 65
Explanation and Analysis:

This quote reaffirms the schism within Kambili's family--a split that is based around Papa's pride and rigid adherence to his own brand of religious dogma. Kambili and Jaja are only allowed to visit their grandfather, Papa-Nnukwu, for fifteen minutes each Christmas, and never to accept food or drink from him. Here Papa-Nnukwu's brief update highlights how different Papa is from his sister, Aunty Ifeoma. Papa is rich; Ifeoma is poor and widowed. Papa is dogmatic and strict; Ifeoma is openminded and independent. Papa places religion over family; Ifeoma does the opposite (she is a Christian too, but still loves and takes care of her "pagan" father). While Kambili and Jaja are still very much under their father's thumb at this point, every fact they learn about the outside world, and even about their own family, seems to go against Papa's narrow-minded worldview.

Chapter 12 Quotes

It was what Aunty Ifeoma did to my cousins, I realized then, setting higher and higher jumps for them in the way she talked to them, in what she expected of them. She did it all the time believing they would scale the rod. And they did. It was different for Jaja and me. We did not scale the rod because we believed we could, we scaled it because we were terrified that we couldn’t.

Related Characters: Kambili Achike (speaker), Jaja (Chukwuka Achike), Aunty Ifeoma
Page Number: 226
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Kambili watches as Father Amadi teaches children how to exercise by literally "raising the bar"--i.e., putting up a rod and encouraging the children to jump over it, and then gradually raising it higher and higher. Kambili comes to see the rod as a metaphor for different methods of upbringing. She's been raised by a strict, tyrannical parent, Papa, who tries to get her to succeed by hurting her and threatening to hit her. Kambili now understands and admires the strategy that Aunty Ifeoma uses instead: instead of beating or shaming her children, she gives them praise and encouragement--more effective motivators than fear. In the end, Kambili thinks, Ifeoma's method of child-rearing is more powerful, because it encourages children to become self-motivated--they want to jump higher, rather than just jumping out of fear of punishment.

Chapter 15 Quotes

“It’s your father. They called me from the factory, they found him lying dead on his desk.” Mama sounded like a recording…
Jaja grabbed the phone. Aunty Ifeoma led me to the bed. I sat down and stared at the bag of rice that leaned against the bedroom wall… I had never considered the possibility that Papa would die, that Papa could die. He was different from Ade Coker, from all the other people they had killed. He had seemed immortal.

Related Characters: Kambili Achike (speaker), Mama (Beatrice Achike) (speaker), Jaja (Chukwuka Achike), Papa (Eugene Achike), Aunty Ifeoma, Ade Coker
Page Number: 287
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Kambili receives word that her father has been found dead at his desk. Kambili is shocked by the news of her father's death: he'd always seemed like an immortal to her--a harsh, tyrannical god, but still a god.

It's not yet clear why Kambili's father has died so suddenly. And yet his death is a crucial turning-point in the novel. Kambili has been moving further and further from her father's worldview throughout the last couple chapters--as if to reflect Kambili's growing independence, Papa dies, so that he can no longer control what Kambili does or thinks. Papa is a complex character, at once contemptible, admirable, and tragic: he's a brutal bully, but he also seems to love his children sincerely, and has undoubtedly done much good in the world outside his own home.

Chapter 16 Quotes

“I should have taken care of Mama. Look how Obiora balances Aunty Ifeoma’s family on his head, and I am older that he is. I should have taken care of Mama.”
“God knows best,” I said. “God works in mysterious ways.” And I thought how Papa would be proud that I had said that, how he would approve of my saying that.
Jaja laughed. It sounded like a series of snorts strung together. “Of course God does. Look what He did to his faithful servant Job, even to His own son. But have you ever wondered why? Why did He have to murder his own son so we would be saved? Why didn’t He just go ahead and save us?”

Related Characters: Kambili Achike (speaker), Jaja (Chukwuka Achike) (speaker), Papa (Eugene Achike), Mama (Beatrice Achike), Obiora
Page Number: 289
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Kambili and Jaja are still recovering from their father's sudden death. Kambili notes that with Papa dead, they'll have to take care of their mother more closely--indeed, they both feel guilty for not doing so sooner. Jaja in particular feels guilty that he didn't protect his mother from Papa's beatings--he could have saved her many times before, and he contrasts his own submissiveness to his cousin Obiora's maturity. Kambili offers up a cliched truism--God works in mysterious ways--showing that she continues to subconsciously worship her father and imitate his style of religious fervor. (He's dead, of course, but she still immediately thinks of how he would be proud of her for saying this.)

Jaja, by contrast, has entirely rejected Catholicism along with his father's authority. Instead, Jaja now believes that Christianity is just a system of domination, used to justify people's pain and suffering: there's no reason, for instance, why God had to punish Job (or even Christ himself) so harshly. Perhaps God, just like Papa, is a bully, hurting people for no particular reason. In all, the passage shows the divide between Kambili and Jaja. Both have now been freed from Papa's literal control, but they react to this freedom in different ways.

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Jaja (Chukwuka Achike) Character Timeline in Purple Hibiscus

The timeline below shows where the character Jaja (Chukwuka Achike) appears in Purple Hibiscus. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 1
Religion and Belief Theme Icon
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Violence Theme Icon
...“things started to fall apart” in her family after one specific day: her 17-year-old brother Jaja refused to go to communion on Palm Sunday, and her Papa, Eugene, a devout Catholic,... (full context)
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...so she also tries to hide her pride. On this Palm Sunday Papa notices that Jaja did not take the communion. When they arrive home Papa slams his missal down on... (full context)
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...figurines. Kambili feels suffocated in the silence. Mama tells Papa to drink his tea and Jaja to help her clean up. Papa sits down. Usually he gives Kambili and Jaja a... (full context)
Colonialism and Nigerian Politics Theme Icon
Freedom vs. Tyranny Theme Icon
Jaja helps Mama pick up the pieces of the figurines, and Kambili feels like she is... (full context)
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...the usual Sunday routines take place: Mama doesn’t plait Kambili’s hair in the kitchen and Jaja doesn’t go upstairs to his room to read. Kambili tells Mama that she is sorry... (full context)
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Jaja is conspicuously silent, and Papa asks him if he has any “words in his mouth.”... (full context)
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...brings her some soup, but after eating it Kambili throws it up. She asks about Jaja, and Mama says that he didn’t come down for dinner either. Kambili asks if Mama... (full context)
Colonialism and Nigerian Politics Theme Icon
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...and Kambili remembers what started all this change. There were many years when she and Jaja and Mama “spoke more with our spirits than with our lips,” but the true changes... (full context)
Chapter 2
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...events leading up to Palm Sunday. Mama brings Kambili’s school uniforms inside before it rains. Jaja and Kambili wash their own uniforms in the half hour Papa allocates for uniform-washing. It... (full context)
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Jaja comes home from school, wearing his neatly ironed uniform. Last year he was voted “neatest... (full context)
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Jaja goes downstairs and Kambili looks at the written schedule posted on her wall. Papa makes... (full context)
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During family time the next day, Papa and Jaja are playing chess and they are all listening to the radio. A general comes on... (full context)
Chapter 3
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Nothing changes inside the Achike household, however. Jaja and Kambili stick to their strict schedules, while Mama’s pregnancy progresses. At Mass on Pentecost... (full context)
Religion and Belief Theme Icon
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...When they get home Mama offers to pour Papa’s tea, but he refuses. He gives Jaja and Kambili their “love sips” of the tea. Kambili is happy to “feel the love... (full context)
Religion and Belief Theme Icon
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Mama, Jaja, and Kambili then go upstairs to change. The children are scheduled to quietly reflect on... (full context)
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...He carries her downstairs and takes her outside. There is blood on the floor, and Jaja and Kambili clean it up. (full context)
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Mama doesn’t come home that night, and Jaja and Kambili have dinner alone. They don’t talk about Mama, but instead talk about the... (full context)
Chapter 4
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...gets home and goes to her room. She hears Papa come home and go into Jaja’s room. Jaja had come first in his class, so Kambili imagines Papa hugging him and... (full context)
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There is a two-week break from school, and on the last weekend Mama takes Jaja and Kambili to get new sandals and bags. Kambili notices the crowds of the poor... (full context)
Chapter 5
Colonialism and Nigerian Politics Theme Icon
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...is small, round, and cheerful, and Kambili cannot imagine him defying soldiers. Ade jokes with Jaja and Kambili, but they only answer dutifully “yes” or “no.” Ade comments to Papa that... (full context)
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The next morning Jaja and Kambili wake up early to the sounds of bleating goats and people calling greetings... (full context)
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Papa tells Jaja and Kambili that they will visit Papa-Nnukwu today, but only for fifteen minutes, and not... (full context)
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Jaja and Kambili ask about his health, and Papa-Nnukwu says that their Aunty Ifeoma brings him... (full context)
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...difficulty. He offers to buy them soft drinks, saying that they surely cannot be heathen. Jaja first declines, but then says that if he were thirsty, he would drink in Papa-Nnukwu’s... (full context)
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The children come home and Kambili asks Jaja if he will confess about offering to drink in Papa-Nnukwu’s house. Jaja says he was... (full context)
Religion and Belief Theme Icon
Kambili and Jaja then hear Papa yelling outside. He is angry that a “worshiper of idols,” an old... (full context)
Chapter 6
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Papa comes in and Aunty Ifeoma tells him that Jaja and Kambili should spend time with her tomorrow. Kambili feels a strange fear when Ifeoma... (full context)
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...they don’t watch TV, and Amaka is shocked. She thinks that it’s because Kambili and Jaja are bored by it, and sarcastically says that wishes she had that problem. Kambili doesn’t... (full context)
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The next morning Aunty Ifeoma drives in to pick up Jaja and Kambili. She suggests that Kambili wear trousers, and Kambili doesn’t admit that she doesn’t... (full context)
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They stop at Papa-Nnukwu’s house and Ifeoma’s children get out. Jaja and Kambili stay in the car. Ifeoma asks them why they won’t go in, and... (full context)
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...animals. Kambili looks away as told, but feels guilty about “deferring to a heathen masquerade.” Jaja asks Papa-Nnukwu about the people inside the mmuo costumes, but Ifeoma tells him that everyone... (full context)
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They leave and drop off Papa-Nnukwu. When Aunty Ifeoma drops off Jaja and Kambili, Amaka loudly says she doesn’t want to go inside. That night Kambili dreams... (full context)
Chapter 7
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...laughing. Kambili goes out, pacing her breathing so she won’t stutter. Amaka asks her and Jaja about their stereo, wondering if they are bored with it like the TV. They don’t... (full context)
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...shakes his hand. Then they go back upstairs, leaving Papa with the Igwe. Amaka and Jaja go off to discuss a book, and Chima and Obiora play a card game, laughing.... (full context)
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...rice getting cold, but Papa ignores her. As they eat, Ifeoma insists that Papa let Jaja and Kambili visit her in Nsukka to get to know their cousins better. Papa tries... (full context)
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...appearances of the Virgin Mary at the tiny village of Aokpe. Aunty Ifeoma suggests that Jaja and Kambili should come visit her, so she can take them and her own children... (full context)
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Jaja makes Kambili a bowl of cereal, saying that they will hear Papa before he comes... (full context)
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Papa, Mama, and then Jaja go in. Kambili asks Jaja with her eyes if he remembered his words to Papa-Nnukwu... (full context)
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...he is still in a good mood, and he calls Aunty Ifeoma. He says that Jaja and Kambili can go to Aokpe as long as they remember that the sightings of... (full context)
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Jaja and Kambili pack their things, and Mama suggests that they bring food and gas cylinders... (full context)
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...Kevin puts two gas cylinders in the car, along with lots of food. Papa gives Jaja and Kambili schedules for their time in Nsukka. They include two hours each day for... (full context)
Chapter 8
Colonialism and Nigerian Politics Theme Icon
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...potholes. They come to the University of Nigeria, where Kevin asks for directions. Kambili and Jaja notice a statue of a lion on the university lawn, with the motto “To restore... (full context)
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Aunty Ifeoma comes out and hugs Jaja and Kambili, and is delighted to see the food and gas cylinders, which she knows... (full context)
Family Theme Icon
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...priest named Father Amadi. The cousins all hug, though Amaka hardly acknowledges Kambili. Obiora invites Jaja along with him to get soft drinks. Amaka goes into her room, and Ifeoma tells... (full context)
Family Theme Icon
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...their house. Aunty Ifeoma and her children watch TV as they eat, and they invite Jaja and Kambili to join. They are forbidden to watch TV, but they don’t decline the... (full context)
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Aunty Ifeoma says that Jaja and Kambili can stay up as long as they want watching TV. Jaja pulls out... (full context)
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Amaka asks if Jaja and Kambili have schedules at home as well. When they say yes, she says it’s... (full context)
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...up Kambili to fill up their containers of water while the water is still running. Jaja is there too, and he tells Kambili about his night sleeping in the living room.... (full context)
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...makes a breakfast that seems paltry compared to Kambili’s usual one. Ifeoma wants to show Jaja and Kambili the university and be back for dinner, as she has invited Father Amadi... (full context)
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Jaja lingers by the purple hibiscus, but then they all get in the car. To save... (full context)
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Back at home Jaja and Obiora go off to play soccer, and Kambili stays with Aunty Ifeoma and Amaka... (full context)
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...in Aunty Ifeoma’s house, and her children talk familiarly and joke with him. He asks Jaja and Kambili questions about themselves, and Kambili is grateful that Jaja gives all the answers.... (full context)
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...she had to use the pilgrimage to Aokpe to convince him to let Kambili and Jaja visit. She says she hadn’t planned on going to Aokpe, but that she might as... (full context)
Chapter 9
Family Theme Icon
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...evening as Kambili sets the table, she hears Amaka asking Aunty Ifeoma if Kambili and Jaja are “abnormal.” Ifeoma rebukes her and tells her to respect her cousins, but Amaka repeats... (full context)
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...the veranda with the book and watches a little girl chase a butterfly. Obiora and Jaja are on the verandah as well, but on the other side of the shade. Obiora... (full context)
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Jaja makes a comment about the British losing many battles before their overall victory, and Kambili... (full context)
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Chima notices that Jaja’s little finger is gnarled and deformed, and he asks him about it. Aunty Ifeoma quickly... (full context)
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...calls and says that everything is fine. He doesn’t mention the Standard. Ifeoma says that Jaja and Kambili are to stay a few extra days, and Jaja smiles joyfully. (full context)
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...he was playing soccer with some boys earlier, and that next time he will bring Jaja and Obiora along. Kambili is amazed at the thought of a priest playing soccer. Father... (full context)
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...collected. Kambili notices (as she has many times by now) that he seems older than Jaja. Ifeoma says she doesn’t have enough fuel to get to Abba. Father Amadi offers her... (full context)
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...into her room to listen to her “culturally conscious” musicians, which Kambili can recognize now. Jaja works in the garden. Kambili asks him, whispering, if he thinks that they’re “abnormal.” Jaja... (full context)
Colonialism and Nigerian Politics Theme Icon
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...running his own small clinic since the strike. Later the doctor arrives and examines Papa-Nnukwu. Jaja and Kambili sit on the verandah. Jaja is concerned with Papa-Nnukwu’s health, while Kambili is... (full context)
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Kambili is surprised at Jaja’s tone, as if he doesn’t care whether Papa finds out or not. She asks him... (full context)
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Doctor Nduoma leaves, and Aunty Ifeoma thanks Jaja for cleaning her car, calling him by the same title she uses for her sons.... (full context)
Chapter 10
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...Amadi is delighted to hear that Papa-Nnukwu is improving, and he says he will take Jaja and Obiora to the stadium that evening to play soccer. He asks about Kambili, and... (full context)
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...can’t answer. Father Amadi says that Papa must have told her that. He says that Jaja has told him some about Papa. Kambili looks away, wondering why Jaja would do such... (full context)
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...says he will call Doctor Nduoma, and there is a new authority in his voice. Jaja covers Papa-Nnukwu’s body, and Kambili wants to help him but knows it will be sinful... (full context)
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...has just parked outside the flat. Kambili suddenly freezes. Papa comes inside and Kambili and Jaja greet him mechanically. Aunty Ifeoma says that he should not have come, but Papa says... (full context)
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Papa gathers Kambili and Jaja to him, kissing their heads, and he tells them to get their things. Aunty Ifeoma... (full context)
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...the door when they arrive. She has a black eye and her face is swollen. Jaja delivers the news about Papa-Nnukwu when Papa doesn’t mention it. Papa says that his father... (full context)
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...eat Kambili notices how much meat they all have compared to at Aunty Ifeoma’s house. Jaja asks Papa for the key to his room, as he wants some privacy—Papa always keeps... (full context)
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Everyone is silent for the rest of dinner, and afterward Jaja follows Papa upstairs. Mama looks through fabric samples for the new curtains, which they have... (full context)
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...and gives her Panadol. She nods when Kambili asks if she had to go to Jaja’s room as well. Mama assures her that her feet will be healed in time to... (full context)
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The next day Kambili tells Jaja about the painting. Neither of them mention their feet. Jaja says that he also has... (full context)
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...Papa-Nnukwu’s funeral. Just then, Ade Coker arrives with another man and Papa leaves the table. Jaja and Kambili try to hear what they are talking about. Ade says that the head... (full context)
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...be shaking. Kambili wants to talk about the many people coming to the house, but Jaja looks away when she brings it up with her eyes, and changes the subject when... (full context)
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...painting, and Amaka talks about Papa-Nnukwu’s upcoming funeral. Amaka says that she hopes Kambili and Jaja can come for Easter, so they can be there for her confirmation and maybe see... (full context)
Chapter 11
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...opens it at the breakfast table with his family he is blown up. Kambili and Jaja come home that day to find Papa sobbing on the sofa, looking small and broken.... (full context)
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...and then shut down the factory, claiming unsanitary conditions. Papa doesn’t check very often that Jaja and Kambili are following their schedules, so they spend more time together. (full context)
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One day when Papa is with Father Benedict, Jaja comes into Kambili’s room and asks to see the painting of Papa-Nnukwu. Kambili nervously takes... (full context)
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Papa comes in and sees the painting. Jaja and Kambili both claim that the painting is theirs, and Papa starts to sway back... (full context)
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...that Papa has never done something like this before. Ifeoma firmly declares that Kambili and Jaja will go to Nsukka, at least until Easter, once Kambili is healed. Eventually their voices... (full context)
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...comes back. That night Mama tells Kambili that she will be going to Nsukka with Jaja when she is discharged in two days. Somehow Aunty Ifeoma had convinced Papa. (full context)
Chapter 12
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...Ifeoma’s house and everyone treats her gingerly, as if she was still weak and sick. Jaja goes out to work in the garden. The aku, a seasonal flying termite that some... (full context)
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...by the thought of life without Aunty Ifeoma and her family. She goes outside, where Jaja is working in the garden, and breathes deeply. (full context)
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...like adults, expecting more of them until they can jump over the bar. Kambili and Jaja, on the other hand, only jump because they are terrified of the alternative. (full context)
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Aunty Ifeoma tells Obiora to kill the chicken, but Jaja offers to do it instead. Kambili is shocked, as Jaja has never killed a chicken... (full context)
Chapter 13
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...and they both think about how different this is from how Papa treats Kambili and Jaja. (full context)
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Papa arrives the next day to pick up Mama, Jaja, and Kambili. He hugs them all, and Kambili notices that he has a strange rash... (full context)
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When they reach their home, Jaja comments that the purple hibiscuses are about to bloom. The next day is Palm Sunday,... (full context)
Chapter 14
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...Sisi to sweep up the rest of the figurines. Mama doesn’t sneak extra food to Jaja’s room as usual, but brings it on a tray. The day after Palm Sunday, Jaja... (full context)
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Later Kambili goes to Jaja’s room, and he moves his desk to let her in. They discuss Yewande Coker’s daughter,... (full context)
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Kambili is horrified by this news. She calls for Jaja, who talks to Aunty Ifeoma. When he hangs up he declares that they are going... (full context)
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Jaja comes in with a hastily packed bag and says that Papa has agreed to let... (full context)
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...that she is thinking about Papa. She says that he called, but neither she nor Jaja would go to the phone. Father Amadi asks if she had wanted to talk to... (full context)
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...her finger and putting it on his own. He says that Ifeoma wants her and Jaja to go to boarding school. He is going to Enugu to talk to Father Benedict... (full context)
Chapter 15
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Aunty Ifeoma decides that they should finally make the pilgrimage to Aokpe. Jaja says he does not want to go, and Obiora agrees to stay with him and... (full context)
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...ask Papa to help buy the plane tickets, so they will go to Enugu with Jaja and Kambili soon and stay there until they leave. Ifeoma tells Jaja and Kambili that... (full context)
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...snacks to have a picnic and then start to climb. Suddenly Amaka starts running, and Jaja and Chima run after her. Kambili joins them, and she sprints past the boys, reaching... (full context)
Chapter 16
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They all go to Enugu. Kambili and Jaja sit in the living room, staring at the spot where the étagère and the ballet-dancer... (full context)
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Jaja says that he should have taken better care of Mama, like Obiora takes care of... (full context)
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...to scream, asking Mama why she chose his tea. She grabs Mama and shakes her. Jaja pulls Kambili off and hugs her. He tries to hug Mama but she moves away. (full context)
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A few hours later the police arrive. Before they can even ask any questions Jaja confesses that he used rat poison to kill his father. The police let him change... (full context)
Chapter 17
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...is familiar with the route to the prison, where she and Mama go to visit Jaja. They have a new driver now named Celestine, and he is taking them both today.... (full context)
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...that the old regime assassinated him. The family’s lawyers recently informed Kambili and Mama that Jaja will be released next week. Kambili and Mama don’t talk about it, but they each... (full context)
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Kambili and Mama don’t talk about anything anymore, including the bribes they’ve written on Jaja’s behalf, the distribution of Papa’s will, and the discovery that he had anonymously donated to... (full context)
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They reach the prison compound. Jaja is back in his old cell, in much worse conditions than a month before. He... (full context)
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Aunty Ifeoma sends cassette tapes of her family’s voices to Jaja. Sometimes he plays them when Kambili visits. Ifeoma writes to Kambili and Mama, and talks... (full context)
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...and Kambili inside and gives them an hour to visit. They sit and wait for Jaja, and Kambili thinks about her letters from Father Amadi, which she always carries with her.... (full context)
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Mama sets up a meal for Jaja, and then he comes into the room. They don’t hug Jaja because he doesn’t like... (full context)
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...alive. Kambili still prays for Papa every Sunday, but she has not told Mama or Jaja this. She still dreams about Papa, and wants to see him in her dreams. There... (full context)
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Jaja points out that Mama’s scarf has come undone. Kambili is amazed, as usually he doesn’t... (full context)