Robinson Crusoe

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Robinson Crusoe Chapter 12 Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
For five years after this, not much happened, as Robinson continued to grow barley and rice, harvest grapes and dry them into raisins, and hunt. He built a smaller canoe than his earlier one and was able to bring this one to water. Stocking it with provisions and building a sail, he set off in the canoe to sail around the perimeter of his island.
Robinson continues to live self-sufficiently on the island. Now that he is relatively comfortable and content with his life there, he sets out to explore around the island's perimeter.
Themes
Society, Individuality, and Isolation Theme Icon
Contentment vs. Desire and Ambition Theme Icon
When he got to the western side of the island, Robinson went ashore, climbed a hill, and looked out on the water, seeing a dangerous current that his boat might be caught up in. Indeed, the next day, he was swept up in the current and feared that he would be driven far out to sea. He says that this showed him "how easy it was for the providence of God to make even the most miserable condition of mankind worse."
The dangerous current reminds Robinson how easily God can drastically change one's life—for better or for worse.
Themes
Christianity and Divine Providence Theme Icon
Fortunately, though, Robinson was able to direct his small boat into an eddy that brought him back toward the island. He got to shore on the island's north side, and gave thanks to God, resolving not to try to escape his island any longer.
Robinson thanks God for not being driven out to sea, and resolves to be contented with his life on the island.
Themes
Christianity and Divine Providence Theme Icon
Contentment vs. Desire and Ambition Theme Icon
Not wanting to risk the open sea again, Robinson piloted his boat into a river and harbored it in the stream before walking back to his home. He noticed that he was only a little farther away than when he had journeyed here by foot. He took with him from his boat only his gun and umbrella.
Having nearly been driven away from the island by the current, Robinson is happy to be safe and content to walk home and not risk journeying by boat again. This contentment stands in contrast to his lack of contentment with the comfortable life offered to him by his parents. He had to make mistakes and be marooned on the island in order to find it.
Themes
Contentment vs. Desire and Ambition Theme Icon
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Robinson made it to his little dwelling in the forest, which he called his "country house," and slept. He was awakened, though, by a voice calling, "Robin, Robin, Robin, Crusoe; poor Robin Crusoe! Where are you, Robin Crusoe?" Robinson woke up shocked, but saw that it was merely his talking parrot Poll.
Robinson's talking parrot is his only speaking companion and emphasizes his lack of fellow humans on the island. With his "country house", Robinson continues to "civilize" the island for himself.
Themes
Society, Individuality, and Isolation Theme Icon
Robinson returned to his home, content to stay on his area of the island and resign himself "to the dispositions of Providence." He continued to make tools, pottery, and wicker-ware, and was particularly pleased to be able to make a tobacco pipe. His gunpowder, though, was running low.
Robinson is now comfortable and content with the solitary, self-sufficient life he has been dealt by fate and God's providence.
Themes
Christianity and Divine Providence Theme Icon
Society, Individuality, and Isolation Theme Icon
Contentment vs. Desire and Ambition Theme Icon