Robinson Crusoe

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Robinson Crusoe Chapter 9 Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
Robinson journeyed back to his dwelling, which he now fondly thought of as his home. Along the way, he captured a goat and brought it back home, where he tamed it and it became another one of his pets. As the two-year anniversary of his arrival on the island came around, Robinson began to think that his life on the island was better and happier than the "cursed, abominable" life he had led before.
As Robinson becomes more accustomed to life at his new home with his pets, he begins to see his life of solitude as a good thing in comparison to his wicked former life, rather than as a punishment. He is now somewhat more content with his fate.
Themes
Christianity and Divine Providence Theme Icon
Society, Individuality, and Isolation Theme Icon
Contentment vs. Desire and Ambition Theme Icon
One day, Robinson was again feeling sad about his circumstances, but he opened his Bible and read the words, "I will never leave thee, nor forsake thee." He reasoned that it was much better to be forsaken by the world and not by God than vice versa.
Robinson's new faith causes him to see his isolated, Christian life as superior to a less religiously devout life in society.
Themes
Christianity and Divine Providence Theme Icon
Society, Individuality, and Isolation Theme Icon
Robinson kept busy his third year on the island by hunting, building improvements for his dwelling, and reading the Bible. His barely and wheat began to grow and he fenced off these plants to keep wild animals away from his crops. Birds, however, started eating his crops, so he shot several birds and hung them up just as "notorious thieves in England," were punished. This scared away the birds, who left Robinson's crops alone.
Robinson continues to read the Bible and fend for himself, figuring out how to keep the birds away from his crops. His comparison of the birds to thieves underscores how alone he is. Robinson has no human company—only pets and wild animals.
Themes
Christianity and Divine Providence Theme Icon
Society, Individuality, and Isolation Theme Icon
Robinson reflects on how difficult it is to harvest grains and make bread. He had to do this without a spade, a harrow, a mill to grind grains, yeast and salt to make bread, and an oven to bake bread. Nonetheless, he was able to make bread through "labour and invention."
Robinson's solitary life makes him more inventive and hard-working, as he labors to make his own bread without all of the requisite tools and ingredients.
Themes
Society, Individuality, and Isolation Theme Icon
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