Sense and Sensibility

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Sense and Sensibility Chapter 42 Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
Before leaving London, Elinor saw John one more time, and he congratulated her on “travelling so far towards Barton without any expense, and on Colonel Brandon’s being to follow them to Cleveland in a day or two.” Marianne and Elinor finally left London at the beginning of April. For all her earlier eagerness to leave, Marianne now found it hard to part with Mrs. Jennings’ home.
John congratulates Elinor on what he thinks is a deliberate scheme to travel without spending money and to spend time with Colonel Brandon. In typical, romantic fashion, Marianne has formed a deep sentimental attachment to Mrs. Jennings’ London home.
Themes
Character, Sense, and Sensibility Theme Icon
Society and Strategy Theme Icon
Wealth, Class, and Greed Theme Icon
When the sisters arrived at Cleveland, Marianne had “a heart swelling with emotion” from being so close to Barton and to Willoughby’s home. She planned to spend most of her time there on solitary walks outside. Mrs. Palmer was a kind hostess, and the sisters had a comfortable stay.
Marianne once again lets her emotions get the best of her, as she is consumed by thoughts of Willoughby and the desire to see her mother.
Themes
Love and Marriage Theme Icon
Character, Sense, and Sensibility Theme Icon
Elinor was surprised to find Mr. Palmer behaving gentlemanly and “found him very capable of being a pleasant companion.” Colonel Brandon arrived and spent much time talking to Elinor. Mrs. Jennings continued to think that Colonel Brandon loved Elinor, though Elinor knew he had his eyes on Marianne.
Elinor is surprised by Mr. Palmer’s behavior because she previously thought him to be a rather disagreeable character. Mrs. Jennings is still misinformed when it comes to her society gossip.
Themes
Character, Sense, and Sensibility Theme Icon
Society and Strategy Theme Icon
Marianne went on “delightful twilight walks” two nights in a row and walked through the areas where “the grass was the longest and wettest.” She sat in her wet shoes and stockings, and came down with a terrible cold. She refused everyone’s advice for remedies, but Elinor finally persuaded her to try “one or two of the simplest of the remedies” before going to bed.
Marianne goes on stereotypically romantic walks outside. Lacking the prudence and good sense of Elinor, she gets herself sick by staying in her wet clothes.
Themes
Character, Sense, and Sensibility Theme Icon
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