Tess of the d'Urbervilles

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The intelligent, idealistic son of the parson James Clare. He rejects his father's and brothers' profession to instead study agriculture, and remains skeptical of religion. Tess, Izz, Retty, and Marian all fall in love with him at Talbothays, but he chooses Tess. He loves an idealized, “child of nature” version of Tess, however, and is shocked to learn about her past sexual experiences (even if they were done to her rather than of her own volition). Angel cares more than he would like about the approval of his family and society, and he rejects Tess despite his own sexual transgressions in his past.

Angel Clare Quotes in Tess of the d'Urbervilles

The Tess of the d'Urbervilles quotes below are all either spoken by Angel Clare or refer to Angel Clare. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
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). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Penguin Books edition of Tess of the d'Urbervilles published in 2003.
Chapter 18 Quotes

What a fresh and virginal daughter of Nature that milkmaid is!

Related Characters: Angel Clare (speaker), Tess Durbeyfield
Page Number: 120
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, we see how Angel Clare sees Tess. He's met Tess before, but it's only here that he really starts to notice her. Although Tess has already had her child and become a soberer, more mature young woman, Angel thinks of her as "fresh and virginal"--he's blind to Tess's past, and assumes that she's entirely innocent. Indeed, he sees her more as an idea or symbol than as a real person.

Angel's interest in Tess suggests a couple things: first, that instead of worshipping a Christian God, he's attracted to a more pagan, mysterious Nature-God, as embodied by Tess. Second, it's crucial to notice that Angel can't see Tess's inner tragedy: although she's already been raped and given birth to a child, Angel doesn't know about it. The reader's knowledge of Tess's past versus Angel's ignorance, creates an ironic tension that's central to the fated, inevitable tone of the novel: we just know that Angel's going to find out about Tess sooner or later.

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Chapter 19 Quotes

He was surprised to find this young woman – who though but a milkmaid had just that touch of rarity about her which might make her the envied of her housemates – shaping such sad imaginings. She was expressing in her own native phrases… feelings which might almost have been called those of the age – the ache of modernism.

Related Characters: Tess Durbeyfield, Angel Clare
Page Number: 124
Explanation and Analysis:

As Angel gets to know Tess better, he comes to realize that she isn't as simple as he'd assumed. Here, Tess tells Angel something about her experience: when she's outside, she has no fears, but indoors, she's frightened. Moreover, she often feels depressed and thinks that the future is fated to be tragic or meaningless. Angel is amazed that Tess can be so pensive and melancholy--he'd thought of her as the stereotypical, cheerful milkmaid.

The passage is very important insofar as it ties Tess's feeling to the overall trends in British society. Tess embraces wide open spaces--the natural vistas that industrialization is gradually destroying. By contrast, she's afraid when she's inside, because closed doors symbolize the claustrophobic "looming" of civilization. Note also that it's Angel, not Tess, who phrases her melancholy as the "ache of modernism." It's Tess who feels the ache, but Angel who articulates it, and ties it in with general social trends. Angel assumes that he is more intelligent and experienced than Tess, but she actually feels what he can only observe.

Chapter 24 Quotes

Amid the oozing fatness and warm ferments of the Froom Vale, at the season when the rush of juices could almost be heard below the hiss of fermentation, it was impossible that the most fanciful love should not grow passionate.

Related Characters: Tess Durbeyfield, Angel Clare
Page Number: 149
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Hardy describes the yearly rituals of harvesting and fermenting. The people of the countryside are picking their crops and fermenting them to produce alcohol and other products. It is, in short, a season of growing and maturation. By the same token, Hardy argues, Tess and Angel's feelings for one another are growing stronger and more lively--it's inevitable, in such a time, that they'd ultimately give in to their desire for one another.

The passage uses extremely vivid, sexual language--"oozing," "warm," "hiss," etc.--to convey the extent of Tess and Angel's growing romance. The narrator again creates a sense of fatedness, suggesting that Tess and Angle have no choice but to fall in love. And yet here, the fatedness that the narrator conveys seems cheerier and more optimistic, rather than tragic. If Tess and Angel's relationship only existed within the world of the fertile Froom Vale (apart from the darkness of the Chase and the d'Urberville's world) all might have ended happily, but because of external forces and Tess's own past, the positive power of nature and love is tragically corrupted.

Chapter 31 Quotes

Distinction does not consist in the facile use of a contemptible set of conventions, but in being numbered among those who are true, and honest, and just, and pure, and lovely, and of good report – as you are, my Tess.

Related Characters: Angel Clare (speaker), Tess Durbeyfield
Page Number: 195
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Angel and Tess are contemplating their possible future together. Angel is enamored with Tess, and yet Tess insists that she's no match for an educated, intelligent man like Angel. Angel tries to reassure Tess by saying that her natural beauty and instinct is far superior to any training or social convention. In other words, Tess might lack certain manners or knowledge of the rules, but manners and rules are overrated, anyway. (He also assumes that her claims of being less moral than he is are just the qualms of the truly innocent.)

Angel's comments illustrate his free-thinking tendencies, and also his rather condescending view of Tess and life in general. Although he was raised in a severe, religious household, Angel has come to doubt religion altogether. He doesn't have much respect for people who learn the rules; he's more attracted to those like Tess who embody a natural purity and "life force" within them (or at least Angel thinks they do). Angel's beliefs are, perhaps, typical of 19th century Romantics who distrusted order and convention and favored instinct--and thus Hardy acknowledges the power of this worldview while also critiquing it as naive and sometimes dehumanizing.

Chapter 35 Quotes

“I repeat, the woman I have been loving is not you.”
“But who?”
“Another woman in your shape.”

Related Characters: Tess Durbeyfield (speaker), Angel Clare (speaker)
Page Number: 229
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Tess has revealed to Angel that she had a child (we're not told what, exactly, she tells Angel about her experience with Alec, but we know that Angel knows a lot more about Tess's past than he did before). Angel is disturbed by what he's learned. He's shocked that Tess isn't a virgin (even though he himself has just confessed that he's not a virgin either), and he's surprised that Tess could have kept such a piece of information from him for so long. Angel sums up his feelings by exactly echoing what Tess feared in the previous two chapters: he claims that he doesn't really know Tess at all; he's been in love with an idealized, false version of her.

Angel's claims are harsh but perhaps well-founded. He has idealized Tess by imagining her to be pure and innocent--he hasn't really thought of her as a human being at all. Instead, he's thought of her as a Romantic ideal, to be worshipped but not respected as a person. Thus his rejection of her is cruel and sexist (as he assumes that she has no right or reason to reject him in turn for consensually sleeping with someone else out of wedlock), but it is also somewhat "just" in that it finally reveals the truth about their relationship--that Tess has truly loved Angel for who he is, but that Angel has only loved Tess for who he imagines her to be.

Here was I thinking you a new-sprung child of nature; there were you, the belated seedling of an effete aristocracy!

Related Characters: Angel Clare (speaker), Tess Durbeyfield
Page Number: 232
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage we see the limits of Angel's love for Tess, and his character in general. Angel has thought of Tess in the most idealistic terms imaginable: he's thought of her as a sweet, innocent "nature goddess," totally separate from both sexual experience and the corruption of England's aristocratic past. Now that he knows the truth about Tess, however, he sees that his "ideal" was a fiction all along (something we had already recognized, obviously). Furthermore, Angel reveals the extent of his hypocrisy and shallowness, as he allows his academic ideals to overcome basic compassion and humanity. He's not only mad that Tess isn't a virgin--he also doesn't like that Tess is tied to the d'Urbervilles, a wealthy, aristocratic family that represents everything Angel hates.

Once again, we see Angel punishing Tess for things beyond her control. She didn't ask to be born a d'Urberville or to be raped by Alec, but Angel nonetheless judges her for her connection to Alec and for her d'Urberville heritage. Just as before, Angel isn't really judging Tess as a human being at all; he just "analyzes" her in social terms. Angel struggles to see Tess for who she really is; he's so accustomed to thinking in terms of class and nature that his impressions of women are almost always distorted.

Chapter 40 Quotes

Because nobody could love ‘ee more than Tess did! …She would have laid down her life for ‘ee. I could do no more.

Related Characters: Izz Huett (speaker), Tess Durbeyfield, Angel Clare
Page Number: 270
Explanation and Analysis:

In his anger, disappointment, and despair Angel has spontaneously decided to travel to Brazil, and as he leaves he impulsively asks a local woman named Izz Huett (who was a friend of Tess's, and who also had strong feelings for Angel) to come with him. Angel asks Izz if she loves him more than Tess, but Izz--despite her love for Angel, and her crushing disappointment that he chose Tess--cannot affirm this falsehood. She confesses that Tess loved Angel purely and absolutely: Tess would gladly have sacrificed her life for Angel.

The passage shows Izz's loyalty to Tess, in spite of the fact that they're "competing" for Angel's affections. Furthermore, Izz's Biblical choice of phrasing ("laid down her life") suggests the religious, even Christian, quality of Tess's personality. Like Christ, Tess is willing to sacrifice herself for the good of other people--in other words, she's as generous and selfless as Angel is selfish.

Chapter 58 Quotes

“It is as it should be,” she murmured. “Angel, I am almost glad – yes, glad! This happiness could not have lasted. It was too much. I have had enough; and now I shall not live for you to despise me!”

Related Characters: Tess Durbeyfield (speaker), Angel Clare
Page Number: 396
Explanation and Analysis:

Tess has murdered Alec and fled with Angel, but Angel hasn't yet been entirely sure that Tess really committed the crime she's confessed to. In this scene, Tess falls asleep at Stonehenge, as Alec watches the monument become surrounded by policemen. Tess wakes with the sun, and sadly tells Angel that she's glad that she'll be punished for her crime. As she explains, all happiness is fleeting. Even if she'd found a way to live with Angel again and start a normal life with him, her happiness would eventually have given way to tragedy, somehow--he surely would have come to "despise" her.

Tess's speech indicates that she's finally given in to the power of destiny. Previously, Tess tried to carve out freedom for herself, but in the end, she seems to accept that she has no real control over her own life. Tess's happiness--a happiness deeply rooted in the glory of nature and the outdoors--is doomed to die (just as England's natural beauty is doomed to be replaced with factories). One could say that Tess embodies the Romantic ideal, the principle that all glory and happiness is fleeting, even if the struggle to achieve such happiness is heroic. Tess has briefly and gloriously (if violently) asserted her will and humanity by killing her rapist and oppressor, but social and divine forces eventually catch up with her, and she cannot escape her tragic fate.

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Angel Clare Character Timeline in Tess of the d'Urbervilles

The timeline below shows where the character Angel Clare appears in Tess of the d'Urbervilles. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 2
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...the women reach the village green they begin to dance. They are watched by three Clare brothers, Angel, Cuthbert, and Felix, who are students and members of a higher social class.... (full context)
Chapter 17
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...girl keeps talking, and eventually reveals some information about the mysterious man; his name is Angel Clare, he is a parson's son, and he is at Talbothays to learn one of... (full context)
Chapter 18
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Angel is the youngest son of Reverend Clare, and the only one without a University degree,... (full context)
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Reverend Clare was shocked and grieved at this news, and finally decided that if Angel was not... (full context)
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Angel stays in the largest room in the attic, and at first he liked to read... (full context)
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Clare then begins to enjoy his outdoors work more, and feels more liberated in Nature than... (full context)
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Angel usually sits apart from the mess table, and the churn turns on the other side,... (full context)
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Angel keeps watching Tess, and remarks to himself what an innocent “daughter of Nature” she seems.... (full context)
Chapter 19
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...the rotation delivers. Soon she keeps getting her favorite cows, however, and then notices that Angel is in charge of arranging the rotation. They talk coyly and Tess implies that she... (full context)
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One evening Tess is in the garden, enjoying the silence, when she hears Angel playing the harp. She is transfixed “like a fascinated bird,” though in reality his playing... (full context)
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...and snails stain her arms. She loses herself in the music and starts to cry. Angel stops and then comes around the fence, and Tess unsuccessfully tries to sneak away. (full context)
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Angel asks Tess what she is afraid of, and she says she has no fears when... (full context)
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Angel muses that it is strange that Tess should have these ideas at such a young... (full context)
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They slowly learn more of each other. Tess first regards Angel as a pure intelligence, and she feels inferior. One day she laments that she knows... (full context)
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Angel is again surprised, as he has had similarly troubled thoughts. He leaves and Tess stands... (full context)
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Tess asks the dairyman if Angel respects old families, and Crick warns her that Angel hates the idea of them. He... (full context)
Chapter 20
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...happy and content, at the level above neediness but below stifling high society. Tess and Angel remain in a state of limbo, but it is inevitable that they will come together... (full context)
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Tess and Angel meet often, as they both rise earlier than the other workers. When they are alone... (full context)
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On these early mornings herons approach them, and Tess and Angel watch the fog cover the fields. Drops of dew cling to Tess's face and she... (full context)
Chapter 21
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...being in love, and at last they all admit that they are, and reveal that Angel is the object of their devotion. Then Marian says that their love is in vain,... (full context)
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Tess lies awake, upset. She knows that Angel prefers her, and that he had even asked Mrs. Crick about hypothetically marrying a farm-woman,... (full context)
Chapter 22
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...form a line and walk slowly across the fields, looking for garlic shoots. Tess and Angel walk side by side, but speak perfunctorily. (full context)
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Tess and Angel break from the line, and Tess tries to turn his attention to Izz and Retty,... (full context)
Chapter 23
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Angel comes wading around the corner, dressed in his work clothes. He now prefers the outdoors... (full context)
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Angel offers to carry them one by one through the pool, but he avoids looking at... (full context)
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Angel starts to carry her, and compares her to Rachel from the Bible. Tess tries to... (full context)
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The others watch Tess, and then Marian blurts out that Angel likes Tess best. Their good moods have vanished, but they do not blame Tess, as... (full context)
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Tess declares that she would refuse Angel if he asked her to marry, but she also doesn't think he will marry any... (full context)
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That night the four discuss Angel again, and say his family has picked out a doctor's daughter for him to marry.... (full context)
Chapter 24
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...inevitable that passion should grow there. It is very hot outside, and the warmth echoes Angel's feelings. All the workers, birds, and cows constantly seek shade or breeze. (full context)
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...Tess starts milking one of her favorite cows, with her head resting meditatively in profile. Angel watches her, and her face is “lovable” to him, no longer otherworldly but real and... (full context)
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...is surprised, but accepts his action with “unreflecting inevitableness” and gives a cry of joy. Angel again almost kisses her, but then apologizes for not asking Tess's permission, and declares his... (full context)
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...and Tess moves to save the milk. They sit together and Tess starts to cry. Angel worries that he has been too forward and taken advantage of her innocence. Crick comes... (full context)
Chapter 25
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That evening Angel is still restless, so he goes outside. He is surprised by his own burst of... (full context)
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Even apart from Tess the dairy has become important to Angel. He realizes that his experiences here are as important as elsewhere, and that Tess is... (full context)
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Angel realizes he should probably avoid Tess for a while, but the thought is repulsive to... (full context)
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At breakfast the four women discover that Angel is gone, and they try to hide their despair. Dairyman Crick blithely discusses his eventual... (full context)
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At that time Angel is riding home to Emminster with some pudding and mead from Mrs. Crick. He watches... (full context)
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Angel passes by his father's church and sees some school-girls, and among them is Mercy Chant,... (full context)
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Angel has come home on an impulse without warning his family, and he arrives at breakfast.... (full context)
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Angel imagines his father uncomprehending and condemning of the “aesthetic, sensuous, pagan pleasure in natural life... (full context)
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Angel sits down and again feels that he has changed while his family remains the same.... (full context)
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Felix comments on Angel's farming future and advises him to not drop his morality and thought, as in his... (full context)
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Angel looks around for his gifts from Mrs. Crick, but his mother has given the puddings... (full context)
Chapter 26
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That night after prayers Angel finally summons the courage to discuss his situation with his father. He talks of his... (full context)
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Angel argues that he ought to marry someone who could help him with farming, but Mr.... (full context)
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Mrs. Clare interrupts to ask about Tess's family. Angel admits that she is not a “lady,” but... (full context)
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Considering his other rebellions, the Clares are pleased that Angel has at least chosen a Christian girl, and they offer to... (full context)
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...to Tess. His father rides with him a while, discussing problems of the parish. Reverend Clare mentions a particular young sinner named d'Urberville. Angel knows about the old family, but Mr.... (full context)
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Angel feels saddened that his father subjects himself to such attacks, but Mr. Clare brushes it... (full context)
Chapter 27
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Angel goes down into the damp, fertile Froom Valley, and feels like he is experiencing life... (full context)
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Tess does not know Angel is back, and he admires the exuberance of Nature within her unconscious self. She suddenly... (full context)
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Angel offers to help her, so it only they two skimming the milk. Tess experiences the... (full context)
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Tess suddenly seems to grow old and tired, and she says she can never be Angel's wife. Her refusal breaks her own heart. Angel is amazed, and wants to know why... (full context)
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They go back to milk-skimming but Tess begins to cry. Angel tries to reassure her about his parents' compassion, and asks about Tess's religious beliefs. Her... (full context)
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Angel talks more about his visit, and then brings up his conversation with his father. He... (full context)
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...runs back into the open field as if trying to escape her sadness. Now that Angel is back in the valley, marrying a dairymaid seems much more natural than marrying a... (full context)
Chapter 28
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Angel is not upset by Tess's refusal, and he is reassured that she already let him... (full context)
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Angel asks again about her refusal, and Tess repeats that she is not good enough for... (full context)
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Tess struggles within herself now, shaken by Angel's persuasive words. She had decided before Talbothays that she would never marry, as she might... (full context)
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...Mr. Crick and his wife seemed to have figured out the relationship, so they leave Angel and Tess alone often. One day they are breaking up cheese curds and Angel takes... (full context)
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Angel begins to grow frustrated and compares her to a fickle city girl, but then he... (full context)
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...pass, and it is Saturday, and Tess cries out to herself that she will let Angel marry her, but at the same time she can't bear the guilt of hurting him... (full context)
Chapter 29
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Angel approaches and again proposes, and Tess refuses. He had planned to kiss her, but his... (full context)
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One dark, early morning Angel begs Tess to speak clearly at last, or he will have to leave. She asks... (full context)
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Later Tess and Angel follow Marian, Retty, and Izz out and Angel remarks how different they are from he... (full context)
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...and Dairyman Crick declares that someone needs to take the milk straight to the station. Angel volunteers and asks Tess to come with him. She is not dressed for cold, but... (full context)
Chapter 30
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...starts to rain, and Tess's hair comes undone. The evening gets cold and she and Angel huddle close under a sailcloth. He asks her for an answer sometime before they get... (full context)
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...in London. The city people have to water it down before they can stomach it. Angel changes the subject to his proposal, and again tries to clarify Tess's objections. (full context)
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Tess begins to tell her history, but Angel dismisses her worries or possibly troubled past. Tess reveals that she is actually a d'Urberville.... (full context)
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Angel laughs at her and says the history of ancient families is interesting to him. Tess... (full context)
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Angel asks that Tess call herself d'Urberville now, and thinks his mother will be impressed. Tess... (full context)
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Angel says she should take his name instead, and so escape the d'Urbervilles. Then Tess finally... (full context)
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...should have agreed eventually. Tess asks to write to her mother in Marlott, and finally Angel remembers where they met. Tess hopes that his first refusal of her is not a... (full context)
Chapter 31
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...be honest, but says she would be a fool to talk about her past to Angel. (full context)
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...the letter. That autumn is one of the happiest times of her life. She loves Angel with perfect trust bordering on worship, assured that he is the ideal of goodness and... (full context)
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Tess is constantly surprised by Angel's chivalry and thoughtfulness. In reality she exaggerates his qualities, but he is a good, spiritual... (full context)
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Tess seeks out Angel whenever they are outdoors, which seems presumptuous and immodest to him until he realizes it... (full context)
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Angel keeps his arm around Tess as they walk, and Tess asks if he would be... (full context)
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...talk, and her gait which is like a bird about to land. Her love for Angel begins to envelop every aspect of Tess's personality, but she never forgets the darkness lurking... (full context)
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One evening they are at home alone when Tess again protests that she is unworthy. Angel responds that being honest and true is better than fitting any convention of society. Tess... (full context)
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...dark past. She leaves for a while to calm down, and when she finally returns Angel says she has been acting capricious. Tess agrees, but promises it is not in her... (full context)
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Angel wants to set a wedding date, but Tess delays, hoping to linger as they are.... (full context)
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At that moment the Cricks and two milkmaids enter, and Tess pulls away from Angel, denying that she was sitting on his knee. Dairyman Crick says he wouldn't have noticed... (full context)
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...in bed, and then Marian asks her to think of them when she is with Angel, and to remember how they loved him and could not hate her. Tess cries and... (full context)
Chapter 32
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Tess's guilt and joy in the engagement keeps her from naming a date. Angel keeps asking her at tempting times, surrounded by natural beauty or among the cows. One... (full context)
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...has to really set a date or else find a new and foreign farm without Angel. He reminds her that they cannot continue as they are forever, and though Tess wishes... (full context)
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...it with the fatalism of her people. She writes again to Joan, reminding her that Angel is a gentleman, and of a different and more discerning society. (full context)
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Angel had emphasized the practicality of their marriage, but really he is still enjoying the recklessness... (full context)
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Angel has begun to influence Tess's way of speaking and thinking, and he fears to leave... (full context)
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Angel also plans to spend a while learning about flour-mills at Wellbridge, and he is greatly... (full context)
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Tess contemplates the date (December 31) in wonder. Izz asks her if Angel will follow the customs and ask her parents for permission, but Angel explains he wants... (full context)
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Angel buys her new wedding clothes, and Tess is overcome with delight. She tries on the... (full context)
Chapter 33
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Angel wants to spend a last romantic day with Tess before their wedding. On Christmas Eve... (full context)
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...are leaving the parlor, one recognizes Tess and makes an insulting remark about her past. Angel hears and strikes him in the face. The man apologizes and pretends it was a... (full context)
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That night Angel dreams he is fighting the insulting man and lashes out in his sleep. This is... (full context)
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...in their honor. No guests from either family arrive, as Tess invited no one and Angel's family is displeased with his hasty decision. He would be more upset if he did... (full context)
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Tess is still unsure if Angel read her note, so she checks his room and finds it hidden under the carpet,... (full context)
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Tess tries to bring up the subject lightly, but Angel dismisses it and says he will confess his sins as well, later when they are... (full context)
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...ancient carriage driven by an ancient man. It is just the couple and the Cricks. Angel wishes his brothers had come, but thinks they would have been out of place among... (full context)
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The ceremony passes in a blur, and once Tess reaches out to assure herself of Angel's reality. He does not yet appreciate the depth and purity of her love for him.... (full context)
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Angel remarks on her expression, and Tess says she feels she has seen the old carriage... (full context)
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...reach home Tess is depressed, and wonders if she is rightfully Alec's wife instead of Angel's. When she is alone she prays to both God and her husband, and laments that... (full context)
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They leave for the flour-mill, and Tess asks Angel to kiss Marian, Retty, and Izz once for her, as they look so very sad.... (full context)
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Angel bids farewell to the Cricks, but at that moment a cock crows. They hear someone... (full context)
Chapter 34
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...about the crowing rooster. On the walls are portraits of old, cruel-looking d'Urberville women, and Angel can't help noticing how Tess resembles them. (full context)
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The sun is low, and they share their first tea together as husband and wife. Angel wonders if he can appreciate yet the power Tess has now placed in his hands,... (full context)
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They wait for their luggage but it gets dark and then starts to rain. Angel sees Tess is upset and regrets bringing her to this old house. He decides she... (full context)
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Tess makes Angel break the grave-looking seal, and inside is a note for Angel from Mrs. Clare. It... (full context)
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Angel expects Tess to be happy about their luggage, but she is upset by the girls.... (full context)
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Angel interrupts her reverie and reminds Tess that he had something to confess. Tess is surprised... (full context)
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Tess is relieved and now ready to tell her story, although Angel still can't believe it could be anything bad. Tess feels her sin is the same... (full context)
Chapter 35
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...finishes her story, and the “essence of things” seems to have been transformed by it. Angel cannot yet comprehend the truth, and asks if Tess is lying or crazy, and why... (full context)
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Angel says forgiveness does not even apply here, that Tess is now an entirely different person... (full context)
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...herself and starts to weep. She asks if they can ever live together now, and Angel says he has not decided yet. Tess despairs and says she will obey like a... (full context)
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Angel cries a single tear. His whole universe has been changed by her confession. He leaves... (full context)
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Tess follows Angel for a long time. The night clears his mind and he can think logically and... (full context)
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Angel admits that the sin was not her fault, but says Tess does not understand his... (full context)
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Tess offers to drown herself in the river to spare Angel his pain. Angel calls her absurd and says their trouble is more satire than tragedy.... (full context)
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Angel returns later and is both relieved and bitter that Tess is asleep. He almost enters... (full context)
Chapter 36
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Angel wakes up and the room seems like the scene of a crime. He makes breakfast... (full context)
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Tess looks purer and more innocent than ever, and Angel almost can't believe that her story is true, but Tess reaffirms it. Angel asks for... (full context)
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Tess says he could still divorce her, but Angel calls her crude and not understanding of the law. She feels even more guilty, and... (full context)
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They eat breakfast mechanically and then Angel goes off to study with the miller. Tess watches him disappear over the bridge and... (full context)
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Angel finds her and says to stop working, that she is not his slave but his... (full context)
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...pass in the same manner, and one morning Tess offers her face to kiss, but Angel ignores it. She is crushed by his rejection, and he says that they have been... (full context)
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Angel spends all his time trying to figure out what to do next, and tells Tess... (full context)
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Tess had hoped that she could wear down Angel's resolve just by being close to him, but when she sees how far he has... (full context)
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...persuade him, but she is too crushed to even try. The narrator muses that if Angel had a more animalistic nature he might have acted more justly, as here his idealism... (full context)
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Tess suggests that they part and she return home, but she is upset when Angel quickly agrees. He is still determined to submit his emotions to his ideals, and decides... (full context)
Chapter 37
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Late that night Angel sleepwalks into Tess's room and begins to grieve that she is dead. Tess knows that... (full context)
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The sleeping Angel picks up Tess in her sheet and murmurs endearing words that bring her joy. She... (full context)
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Tess is pleased that Angel's subconscious self still regards her as his wife, and then she thinks he is reenacting... (full context)
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They reach the Abbey where a stone coffin stands open against the wall. Angel lays Tess inside and kisses her, and then he stretches out on the grass and... (full context)
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The next morning it is clear that Angel remembers nothing of the incident. His resolve to leave Tess remains after his sleep, so... (full context)
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...bids farewell to her favorite cows and they go. Mrs. Crick remarks that Tess and Angel seemed dreamlike and strange. (full context)
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They drive farther and come to the spot where Tess must turn towards Marlott. Angel assures her he is not angry, but they cannot be together right now. He says... (full context)
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Angel gives Tess some money and takes her jewels to keep safe in the bank, and... (full context)
Chapter 38
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...the back door and her mother is shocked to see her. Joan interrogates her about Angel, and Tess breaks down weeping and admits that he left her because she told him... (full context)
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...sees that her bed belongs to other siblings now. She overhears her father hoping that Angel would take Tess's superior name instead of vice versa. Joan tells him the news and... (full context)
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Tess gets a letter from Angel saying he is in North England, and she pretends she is going to meet him.... (full context)
Chapter 39
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Three weeks after the wedding Angel returns home. He is a changed man, and thinks he can see life practically now,... (full context)
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In his wanderings Angel noticed a sign advertising Brazil as a place to pursue agriculture. The idea attracts him,... (full context)
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Again Angel arrives without warning, and his mother is surprised Tess is not with him. He tells... (full context)
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Mrs. Clare is still disappointed and asks Angel to describe Tess. She imagines how beautiful and pure... (full context)
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Mr. Clare asks no questions, but he does read a verse from the Bible about the “virtuous... (full context)
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Mrs. Clare asks Angel what is wrong, and quickly figures out that they have quarreled over something... (full context)
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All these sentiments convince Angel that he has ruined his life with this marriage, and that he will appear as... (full context)
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That same night Tess is thinking of how good Angel is. Neither of them perceive that the real trouble lies in Angel's faults. He is... (full context)
Chapter 40
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After breakfast Angel meets Mercy Chant in town. She approves of him going to Brazil, but her mind... (full context)
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Angel arranges for a stipend to be sent to Tess later, and hopes she will ask... (full context)
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Angel then returns to the d'Urberville house where they had their unhappy wedding night. He stands... (full context)
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Izz says she has left Talbothays because it was too sad for her, and Angel offers her a lift home. As they ride together Angel admits he and Tess are... (full context)
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Angel presses her and Izz admits she was in love with him, and can't believe he... (full context)
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They keep riding, and Angel asks if Izz loves him more than Tess does. Izz cannot help but say that... (full context)
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Angel tries to downplay his request as a joke, but it is clear that it was... (full context)
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Angel is still troubled by Izz's words and wonders again if he is making a mistake.... (full context)
Chapter 41
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...laboring. She has worked occasionally at other dairies and farms in the spring and autumn. Angel's money has all gone to her family's broken roof and Tess's own needs, and she... (full context)
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At the same time Angel is sick with fever in Brazil, and has found that the paradise he expected is... (full context)
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...on the road and then recognizes her from Trantridge. It is the same man that Angel struck for insulting her. He mocks her again and Tess runs away into the woods.... (full context)
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Tess thinks of Angel far away and feels that she is the most unhappy thing in the world. She... (full context)
Chapter 42
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...returns to the road feeling strengthened, but she still cannot be happy as long as Angel condemns her. More men flirt with her, so she puts on her oldest clothes, covers... (full context)
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...Tess sees that it is Marian. Tess slowly reveals how unhappy she is, and that Angel is abroad, but she asks Marian not to question her any further. Marian says the... (full context)
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...does not tell them how bad her situation is, as it might reflect poorly on Angel. (full context)
Chapter 43
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...are frosty and the afternoons rainy, and Tess works constantly, but still she hopes for Angel's forgiveness. Marian wishes more friends from Talbothays would come, so she writes to Izz and... (full context)
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...to finish the reed-drawing, and they start to reminisce. Tess again asks to not discuss Angel, but Izz presses on with questions. Finally Tess collapses from distress and weariness for a... (full context)
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Marian immediately reveals what Izz just told her, which is the story of Angel asking her to come to Brazil with him. Tess goes white and then starts to... (full context)
Chapter 44
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Tess wonders if she should ask the Clares for Angel's address. She has been too independent and proud to appeal to them for... (full context)
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...has been a year since the wedding. Tess feels hopeful that she can win Mrs. Clare over. She passes by the Vale of Blakemore and feels sad, and then goes near... (full context)
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She reaches Mr. Clare's stern-looking church and takes off her walking boots before entering the town. Tess looks for... (full context)
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Tess realizes the men are Angel's brothers, and she dreads meeting them. They see a young woman and name her as... (full context)
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...a bad omen and condemnation of her journey. She cannot bear to return to the Clares' house. The narrator muses that if she had met Mr. Clare first instead of Cuthbert... (full context)
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...to Flintcomb-Ash. She does not realize what a mistake this is, as Mr. and Mrs. Clare would surely have taken her in as a lost soul. (full context)
Chapter 46
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...he calls her improper. Finally Tess reveals that she is married, but she won't say Angel's name. Alec is distressed and begins to return to his old ways, admitting he has... (full context)
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That night Tess writes another, more desperate letter to Angel, but again she remembers the episode with Izz and her uncertainty returns, so she doesn't... (full context)
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Alec scorns her for parroting her husband's beliefs, and Tess defends Angel with a faithfulness he doesn't deserve. She repeats some of his arguments to Alec. Alec... (full context)
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...seems to wake up and apologizes again. He tries to embrace her, but she invokes Angel's reputation and again Alec is ashamed. He leaves, and Tess's recitation of Angel's logical arguments... (full context)
Chapter 47
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Alec admits that Angel's arguments have convinced him, and Tess asks that he keep the religion of kindness and... (full context)
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Alec emphasizes how Angel has abandoned Tess, and again he propositions her, implying that he is closer to her... (full context)
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...be her master again, and if she belongs to anyone it is to him, not Angel. He leaves and the machine starts up again, and Tess keeps working, stunned. (full context)
Chapter 48
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That night Tess writes a passionate letter to Angel, begging that he return because she is so terribly tempted and oppressed. She says her... (full context)
Chapter 49
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The Clares receive Tess's letter and hope that it will make Angel hurry home. Mrs. Clare's only... (full context)
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At that moment Angel is in the interior of Brazil, riding towards the coast. He has had a hard... (full context)
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On one of his journeys Angel rides with another depressed Englishman, and tells him all the details of his marriage. The... (full context)
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...next day the stranger gets a fever and dies, making his words feel more important. Angel begins to realize how narrow-minded he has been, all while thinking he was being so... (full context)
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Angel thinks again of Izz's words and of Tess's faith in him on their wedding day.... (full context)
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Angel also realizes that despite her “impure” past, Tess is still the ideal of purity and... (full context)
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Tess meanwhile fluctuates in her hopes of Angel's return. She decides to learn to sing some of the songs Angel had played on... (full context)
Chapter 51
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Tess suddenly feels the injustice of her situation, and realizes how harsh Angel has been to her. She has never intended to do wrong, and yet she has... (full context)
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Tess writes a sudden, passionate letter to Angel, lamenting how badly he has treated her. She says she can never forgive him for... (full context)
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...never return. She cannot help but feel that Alec is more truly her husband than Angel is. (full context)
Chapter 52
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...fled Flintcomb-Ash, and warn her that Alec is looking for her. They also ask about Angel. (full context)
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Meanwhile Izz and Marian ride on, talking of Tess, Angel, and Alec. They are worried that Tess will succumb to Alec if Angel does not... (full context)
Chapter 53
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At Emminster Vicarage the Clares are nervously waiting for Angel's arrival. The man who comes to the door is unrecognizable,... (full context)
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Angel reads Tess's second, angry letter and despairs that she will never forgive him. Mrs. Clare... (full context)
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Angel decides to break the news of his return slowly in case Tess is still angry.... (full context)
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He waits a while at home but Joan does not write again. Angel rereads Tess's first letter and decides to find her immediately. Mr. Clare says she never... (full context)
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The Clares figure out the reason for the couple's separation, and they take even more pity on... (full context)
Chapter 54
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Angel sets out to find Tess. He passes by Cross-in-Hand, the sinister stone where Tess swore... (full context)
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Angel next goes to Marlott to find out where the Durbeyfields are. Spring has hardly begun... (full context)
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On his way out of town Angel passes by the field where he first saw Tess at the May-Day dance, and he... (full context)
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Angel goes next to Kingsbere and finds Joan's house. She is unwelcoming to him and won't... (full context)
Chapter 55
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That night Angel walks through Sandbourne, a fashionable pleasure city on the English Channel, and wonders what possibly... (full context)
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The next morning Angel asks a postman for information. He has never heard of a Mrs. Clare or a... (full context)
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The landlady says there is a Mrs. d'Urberville there, which slightly confuses Angel, but he asks her to tell Tess that he has come. He waits among flowers,... (full context)
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Tess appears dressed in expensive, elegant clothes. She stands still on the threshold, and Angel begs her forgiveness. Tess's eyes appear strange, and she says it is too late, to... (full context)
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Angel understands the terrible truth. Tess says Alec is upstairs, and that she hates him now,... (full context)
Chapter 56
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Mrs. Brooks, the landlady of The Herons, grows curious about the aftermath of Angel's visit to the d'Urbervilles so she eavesdrops at their door. She hears moaning, and through... (full context)
Chapter 57
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Angel sits at breakfast and stares blankly forward, then suddenly packs up and leaves his hotel.... (full context)
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Tess says she has killed Alec, and she smiles. Angel thinks she is delirious. She says she feared it would happen eventually, and she never... (full context)
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Angel embraces Tess and say he does love her, but he still isn't sure if she... (full context)
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Whether the murder is a hallucination or not, Angel sees he needs to take care of Tess, and finally he kisses her and promises... (full context)
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They feel intoxicated being together and can momentarily forget the murder, although Angel instinctively leads them further into the woods and away from civilization. They ramble about in... (full context)
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They eat and Angel forms a vague plan to lie low in central England until the crime has been... (full context)
Chapter 58
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That night Tess tells Angel the story of his sleepwalking episode, but she begs him not to talk about the... (full context)
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Tess and Angel awake uneasily and decide to leave. Tess says goodbye to the happy place, and admits... (full context)
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...up out of the darkness and they can hear the wind humming through other pillars. Angel realizes that they are at Stonehenge, the ancient heathen temple. (full context)
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Tess lies down on a slab of rock and does not want to go further. Angel urges her on, but Tess decides she is at home among the heathen stones and... (full context)
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Tess feels solemn and peaceful, and suddenly she asks Angel if he will marry her sister Liza-Lu once she is gone. She says Liza-Lu is... (full context)
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Tess asks if they sacrificed to God at Stonehenge, but Angel says it was to the sun instead. Tess asks if he thinks they will meet... (full context)
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A man walks up the hill and approaches them in the dim light. Angel stays quiet, but then realizes there are more men all around them. He suddenly realizes... (full context)
Chapter 59
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...if fleeing something. They are young but their heads are bowed by sadness. One is Angel Clare and the other is Liza-Lu, who has become the image of a young Tess.... (full context)
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...and the College. The only stain is a large prison tower partly disguised by trees. Angel and Liza-Lu gaze fixedly at a pole on the tower's corner. After the clock strikes... (full context)
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...finally ended his game of Tess's fate, and the world has carried out its justice. Angel and Liza-Lu fall to the ground, but after a while they stand up, take hands... (full context)