The Comedy of Errors

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Luciana Character Analysis

Adriana’s sister, who advises her to remain subservient to her husband. She scolds Antipholus of Syracuse (thinking him to be Antipholus of Ephesus) for denying being married to Adriana and tells him to at least try to cover up his infidelity. Antipholus of Syracuse, however, professes his love for Luciana.

Luciana Quotes in The Comedy of Errors

The The Comedy of Errors quotes below are all either spoken by Luciana or refer to Luciana. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Commerce and Exchange Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Simon & Schuster edition of The Comedy of Errors published in 2005.
Act 2, Scene 1 Quotes

A man is master of his liberty:
Time is their master; and when they see time,
They’ll go or come: if so, be patient, sister.

Why should their liberty than ours be more?

Because their business still lies out o’ door.

Related Characters: Adriana (speaker), Luciana (speaker)
Page Number: 2.1.7-11
Explanation and Analysis:

These lines are spoken at the house of Antipholus of Ephesus by his wife, Adriana, and her sister, Luciana. Adriana is upset since Antipholus of Ephesus and his servant Dromio of Ephesus have not returned yet for dinner (recall that Dromio of Ephesus accidentally told Antipholus of Syracuse to come home for dinner). Luciana tells Adriana to be patient, saying that "A man is master of his liberty." In other words, men are free, and can do what they want when they want, and spend their time how they please. Adriana protests, and suggests that the liberty and freedom of a woman should matter the same amount as that of a man, but her sister says men have business "out o' door," and are masters of women.

Thus we see another dynamic develop. As men are masters of their servants, so they are also masters over women. Adriana is not happy with her husband, since he is late, and is she unhappy with her subservient role in the marriage. Note that business and commerce is Luciana's primary reason for which men are the "masters."

Also note that the final lines of the interaction rhyme. In the dialogue that follows, Adriana and Luciana trade fast paced sentences, each speaking one line of iambic pentameter at a time. Trading single lines in this manner is a classic literary device called "Stichomythia."

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Act 2, Scene 2 Quotes

Fie, brother! How the world is changed with you!
When were you wont to use my sister thus?
She sent for you by Dromio home to dinner.

By Dromio?

By me?

By thee; and this thou didst return from him,
That he did buffet thee, and, in his blows,
Denied my house for his, me for his wife.

Did you converse, sir, with this gentlewoman?
What is the course and drift of your compact?
I, Sir? I never saw her till this time.

Villain, thou liest; for even her very words
Didst thou deliver to me on the mart.

I never spake with her in all my life.

How can she thus, then, call us by our names,
Unless it be by inspiration.

Related Characters: Antipholus of Syracuse (speaker), Dromio of Syracuse (speaker), Adriana (speaker), Luciana (speaker)
Page Number: 2.2.163-178
Explanation and Analysis:

Antipholus of Syracuse and Dromio of Syracuse are extremely confused by Adriana's long tirade, and so Antipholus explains that he has just landed in Ephesus. Luciana begins the dialogue in the quote by commenting how changed Antipholus seems, continuing to confuse him for his twin, Antipholus of Ephesus. Luciana asks him why he is treating her sister this way, pretending he doesn't know her when Dromio was sent to bring Antipholus home for dinner. Thus the comedic response of Antipholus and Dromio in turn: "By Dromio?" "By me?"

Adriana confirms that she sent Dromio and that he returned from Antipholus having been beaten and denied. Dromio of Syracuse respond in confusion, since he has never before met Adriana, but Antipholus calls him a liar, having interacted with (beaten) Dromio of Ephesus. Antipholus concludes by asking how else could Adriana know Dromio's name, unless by divine inspiration or witchcraft. This scene continues the building sequence of coincidences and mistaken identities. Like with most of the issues, the servants (Dromios) take the blame for the miscommunications and problems. Antipholus of Syracuse is uncertain what to do and if he is dreaming or not, and he ultimately decides to follow Adriana and pretend to be her husband in order to find out more information.

Act 3, Scene 2 Quotes

And may it be that you have quite forgot
A husband’s office? Shall, Antipholus,
Even in the spring of love, thy love-springs rot?
Shall love, in building, grow so ruinous?
If you did wed my sister for her wealth,
Then for her wealth’s sake use her with more kindness:
Or if you like elsewhere, do it by stealth;
Muffle your false love with some show of blindness:
Let not my sister read it in your eye.

Related Characters: Luciana (speaker), Antipholus of Syracuse
Page Number: 3.2.1-11
Explanation and Analysis:

In this scene, Luciana and Antipholus of Syracuse are talking, while Luciana still believes him to be Antipholus of Ephesus. She chides him for forgetting his duties ("office") as a husband, first for falling out of love with his wife, and second for being so overt about it. She describes his love as rotting, and ruinous, suggesting that wealth was the only reason that Antipholus married Adriana in the first place. If this is the case, Luciana asserts, then Antipholus ought to be kind to her for the same reason: money. Luciana believes that if Antipholus loves someone else, he should hide it and use stealth, here using the figurative language of eyes and blindness to emphasize her point. As the dialogue continues, Antipholus of Syracuse will deny being married to Adriana, and go on profess his love to Luciana herself. Note also that Luciana speaks in rhymes (though not couplets).

Act 4, Scene 4 Quotes

Alas, I sent you money to redeem you,
By Dromio here, who came in haste for it.

Money by me! Heart and good-will you might;
But surely, master, not a rag of money.

Went’st not thou to her for a purse of ducats?

He came to me, and I deliver’d it.

And I am witness with her that she did.

God and the rope-maker bear me witness
That I was sent for nothing but a rope!

Related Characters: Antipholus of Ephesus (speaker), Dromio of Ephesus (speaker), Adriana (speaker), Luciana (speaker)
Related Symbols: The Gold Necklace, Bail Money, and Diamond Ring
Page Number: 4.4.88-96
Explanation and Analysis:

Dromio of Ephesus returns to the arrested Antipholus of Ephesus with the rope that was requested for Adriana. However, since that command, Antipholus has told Dromio of Syracuse to get the bail money. Thus when Dromio of Ephesus shows up with only a rope, Antipholus is furious. Adriana and Luciana then enter, along with the Courtesan. They think that Antipholus is mad, and argue about if Antipholus and Adriana ate dinner together or not. Here, Adriana says that she sent bail money with Dromio. She has, of course, sent it with the other Dromio, so Dromio of Ephesus begins to look insane, too, since he claims only to have been sent for a rope. The confusion in this scene is especially knotted and humorous since Antipholus of Ephesus has given commands to both Dromios. Every character is confused, so the mistakes and false identities continue in their absurdities.

In this scene Adriana pays Antipholus's bail and decides to shut him and Dromio up inside, but moments after their exit, Antipholus and Dromio of Syracuse enter the stage. At this sight, Adriana is convinced that Antipholus and Dromio of Ephesus have escaped. Now, even people are exchanged as commodities, and of course the exchange of persons is also confounded and filled with error. Antipholus and Dromio of Syracuse escape and get ready to leave Ephesus. 

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Luciana Character Timeline in The Comedy of Errors

The timeline below shows where the character Luciana appears in The Comedy of Errors. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Act 2, Scene 1
Marriage and Family Theme Icon
...of Ephesus (the twin of Antipholus of Syracuse), his wife Adriana talks with her sister Luciana. She is upset that neither her husband nor her servant have returned. Luciana suggests that... (full context)
Commerce and Exchange Theme Icon
Marriage and Family Theme Icon
Luciana tells her sister that men “are masters to their females,” but Adriana disagrees. She says... (full context)
Marriage and Family Theme Icon
Adriana tells Luciana that she is sure Antipholus is having an affair, and this is why he is... (full context)
Act 2, Scene 2
Marriage and Family Theme Icon
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
Mistakes and Coincidences Theme Icon
Adriana and Luciana enter. Adriana chastises Antipholus, who she thinks is her husband, for claiming not to know... (full context)
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
Mistakes and Coincidences Theme Icon
Scapegoats and Social Hierarchy Theme Icon
Luciana scolds Antipholus and says that Adriana had sent Dromio to fetch him for dinner. Antipholus... (full context)
Marriage and Family Theme Icon
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
Mistakes and Coincidences Theme Icon
...to be her husband in order to find out more about what is going on. Luciana tells Dromio to go and prepare for dinner at home. Dromio says he must be... (full context)
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
...I in earth, in heaven, or in hell? / Sleeping or waking? Mad or well-advised?” Luciana, Adriana and Antipholus go into Adriana’s home for dinner, leaving Dromio to watch the door. (full context)
Act 3, Scene 2
Marriage and Family Theme Icon
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
Outside the same house, Luciana and Antipholus of Syracuse are talking. Luciana scolds him for losing his love for Adriana... (full context)
Marriage and Family Theme Icon
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
Mistakes and Coincidences Theme Icon
Antipholus is confused, and says he does not know who Luciana is. He asks why she is trying to get him to pretend to be someone... (full context)
Marriage and Family Theme Icon
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
Mistakes and Coincidences Theme Icon
Luciana tells Antipholus to focus his love on her sister, but he says he loves her... (full context)
Commerce and Exchange Theme Icon
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
Mistakes and Coincidences Theme Icon
...“there’s none but witches do inhabit here,” including Adriana. However, he admits that he loves Luciana and says she has almost enchanted him with her “mermaid’s song.” Angelo enters and gives... (full context)
Act 4, Scene 2
Commerce and Exchange Theme Icon
Marriage and Family Theme Icon
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
Mistakes and Coincidences Theme Icon
By the house of Antipholus of Ephesus, Adriana and Luciana are discussing Antipholus. Luciana says that he denied his marriage and tried to woo her... (full context)
Commerce and Exchange Theme Icon
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
Mistakes and Coincidences Theme Icon
Luciana goes to get the money and Adriana and Dromio share some witty banter. He tells... (full context)
Act 4, Scene 4
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
Mistakes and Coincidences Theme Icon
Adriana, Luciana, and the courtesan enter, along with a man named Pinch. Adriana and the courtesan are... (full context)
Commerce and Exchange Theme Icon
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
Mistakes and Coincidences Theme Icon
...says that she sent money with Dromio to bail him out. Dromio denies this, though Luciana says she saw Adriana give him the money. Pinch concludes that both Antipholus and Dromio... (full context)
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
Mistakes and Coincidences Theme Icon
Adriana and Luciana think they are Antipholus and Dromio of Ephesus, just escaped from Pinch, and they flee... (full context)
Act 5, Scene 1
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
Mistakes and Coincidences Theme Icon
...duel to defend his honor. He and the merchant draw their swords, but then Adriana, Luciana, and the courtesan enter. Adriana says that Antipholus is mad and asks for help in... (full context)
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
Mistakes and Coincidences Theme Icon
...“to his wits again,” with “wholesome syrups, drugs, and holy prayers.” The abbess leaves, and Luciana suggests that Adriana go to the Duke to complain. Adriana agrees with the plan. The... (full context)
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
Mistakes and Coincidences Theme Icon
...tells the Duke that his wife shut him out of his own house. Adriana and Luciana both deny this, but Angelo says that he saw it happen. (full context)
Commerce and Exchange Theme Icon
Mistakes and Coincidences Theme Icon
...to get money for bail, but Dromio returned with none; then, he ran into Adriana, Luciana, and Pinch, and Pinch tied him up and put him in a “dark and dankish... (full context)
Commerce and Exchange Theme Icon
Appearances and Identity Theme Icon
Mistakes and Coincidences Theme Icon
...what has happened, and Adriana asks whom she dined with earlier. Antipholus of Syracuse tells Luciana that, now that she knows he is not her brother-in-law, he would like to pursue... (full context)