The Life of Olaudah Equiano

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Michael Henry Pascal Character Analysis

Pascal is the owner of a merchant ship who buys Equiano from the first plantation where he works. Though Pascal is the first white man to treat Equiano kindly, he later cruelly betrays Equiano and sells him to another master. While Equiano seems to forgive him, Pascal—out of either malice or guilt—refuses to engage with Equiano even after Equiano returns as a free man to England.
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Michael Henry Pascal Character Timeline in The Life of Olaudah Equiano

The timeline below shows where the character Michael Henry Pascal appears in The Life of Olaudah Equiano. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 3
Commerce and Trade Theme Icon
Selfhood Theme Icon
...says, God smiled on him. One day the captain of a merchant ship, Michael Henry Pascal, arrived on business to the master’s (Mr. Campbell’s) house. He liked the look of Equiano... (full context)
Culture, Education, and “Civilizing” Theme Icon
Freedom and Slavery Theme Icon
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Pascal named Equiano “Gustavus Vassa.” While Equiano said he’d prefer to be called Jacob, Pascal refused,... (full context)
Culture, Education, and “Civilizing” Theme Icon
...their hands before eating; he also found the women’s slenderness less attractive. He often saw Pascal and Dick reading and wanted to “talk to the books” in order to discover the... (full context)
Culture, Education, and “Civilizing” Theme Icon
Pascal and Equiano lodged at a gentleman’s house where there was a daughter, about the age... (full context)
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Several months later Pascal sent for Equiano and Dick and they sailed to England. At first Equiano was amazed... (full context)
Conversion, Providence, and God’s Will Theme Icon
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Equiano arrived in London to lodge with a relative of Pascal and his two amiable sisters, the Miss Guerins. Equiano grew ill, first with chilblains and... (full context)
Freedom and Slavery Theme Icon
Pascal was appointed a lieutenant on board the Royal George, so Equiano joined him, but they... (full context)
Chapter 4
Culture, Education, and “Civilizing” Theme Icon
Equiano was now accustomed to his new life, especially given the kind treatment by Pascal, which allowed his fear to ebb. Equiano’s English got much better, and he considered the... (full context)
Conversion, Providence, and God’s Will Theme Icon
...He shared this with one of the sisters, and she told him she’d insist to Pascal that Equiano be baptized. In February 1759, then, he was baptized in Westminster. (full context)
Freedom and Slavery Theme Icon
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...accompanied the Miss Guerins all throughout London, though sometimes he stayed by Westminster Bridge with Pascal. There, he played outside with other boys, and once he nearly drowned when he fell... (full context)
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Meanwhile the ship Preston came to Gibraltar from the Levant, and Pascal told Equiano he might see Dick again. But Equiano learned from the Preston’s crew that... (full context)
Freedom and Slavery Theme Icon
Conversion, Providence, and God’s Will Theme Icon
...During this next battle, Equiano saw a number of his companions blown to pieces, and Pascal was wounded, but Equiano took solace in recognizing that even his own death would be... (full context)
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After the battles, Pascal and Equiano moved from their ship to another, the Aetna fire-ship, where Equiano was well-treated... (full context)
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...when Queen said he would instruct Equiano in his business, Equiano began to hope that Pascal—who, after all, treated him kindly and seemed concerned about his moral education—might finally free him. (full context)
Freedom and Slavery Theme Icon
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In December the ship arrived in London. As it sailed into port, Pascal suddenly forced Equiano into a barge, saying he had to prevent Equiano from escaping. Stunned,... (full context)
Commerce and Trade Theme Icon
Pascal took away Equiano’s coat, leaving him with only the nine guineas – a type of... (full context)
Chapter 7
Freedom and Slavery Theme Icon
Commerce and Trade Theme Icon
...36 shillings a month. He hoped to return to England the next year and see Pascal again, imagining that Pascal might be pleased to see him free rather than enslaved. (full context)
Chapter 9
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...whom he regaled with tales of his travels, including the sorry role of their cousin, Pascal, who had betrayed Equiano and sold him to Doran. For his part, Pascal was taken... (full context)