The Mayor of Casterbridge

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a young Scottish man who is traveling through Casterbridge when he offers Henchard a way of restoring wheat to a high quality. Henchard takes a liking to Farfrae and convinces him to abandon his schemes of traveling the world and to stay in Casterbridge and work as his manager instead. Farfrae and Henchard eventually part ways on bad terms and Farfrae starts his own, more successful business in town. Farfrae is well liked for his personality, his good business, and his beautiful singing voice. Farfrae, despite having first seemed interested in Elizabeth-Jane, marries Lucetta. He is unaware of the past relationship between Lucetta and Henchard until Lucetta confesses some part of this just before she dies. Farfrae eventually assumes Henchard’s position in town entirely: he becomes the new mayor, he owns the most profitable business, and he buys and lives in Henchard’s house. After Lucetta’s death, and Henchard’s willing departure from Casterbridge, Farfrae marries Elizabeth-Jane.

Donald Farfrae Quotes in The Mayor of Casterbridge

The The Mayor of Casterbridge quotes below are all either spoken by Donald Farfrae or refer to Donald Farfrae. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
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). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Penguin Classics edition of The Mayor of Casterbridge published in 2003.
Chapter 15 Quotes

But Henchard continued moody and silent, and when one of the men inquired of him if some oats should be hoisted to an upper floor or not, he said shortly, "Ask Mr. Farfrae. He's master here!" Morally he was; there could be no doubt of it. Henchard, who had hitherto been the most admired man in his circle, was the most admired no longer.

Related Characters: Michael Henchard (speaker), Donald Farfrae
Page Number: 98
Explanation and Analysis:

Mr. Farfrae works as Henchard’s manager, but the men disagree on the treatment of their workers. This disagreement comes to a head over the habitually tardy Abel Whittle. Their public disagreement shows Farfrae to be a better man than Henchard, more level-headed and kind, and he wins over the support of the other workers. The disagreement also shows that Farfrae is willing to stand up to Henchard and does not follow all his orders. Henchard responds to both aspects of this situation negatively. He is upset by what he sees to be Farfrae’s betrayal and upset that Farfrae is more popular than himself. This passage captures the shifting power dynamic between these two men. Henchard is no longer “the most admired man in his circle” because Farfrae now fills this space.

Henchard’s bitterness and childishness is obvious to everyone. Instead of taking responsibility for his actions and continuing to lead his workers, Henchard mockingly says that Farfrae is the master when he is asked questions. This behavior is petty, as is his “moody and silent” sulking. This passage reveals another aspect of Henchard’s character: he does not react well to failure. When he fails, he worsens the problem, rather than mending it, by acting childishly. His inability to address the problem of Farfrae’s popularity and leadership means that his own popularity and control fail further. This is the very beginning of a downward spiral for Henchard who, once upset and angry, makes his situation worse by acting more upset and angry.

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Chapter 16 Quotes

"Mr. Farfrae's time as my manager is drawing to a close--isn't it, Farfrae?"
The young man, who could now read the lines and folds of Henchard's strongly-traced face as if they were clear verbal inscriptions, quietly assented; and when people deplored the fact, and asked why it was, he simply replied that Mr. Henchard no longer required his help. Henchard went home, apparently satisfied. But in the morning, when his jealous temper had passed away, his heart sank within him at what he had said and done. He was the
more disturbed when he found that this time Farfrae was determined to take him at his word.

Related Characters: Michael Henchard (speaker), Donald Farfrae
Page Number: 106
Explanation and Analysis:

Henchard’s jealousy and anger over Farfrae’s popularity and willfulness is critical in this scene, in which Henchard publically dismisses Farfrae. In company, he says that Farfrae will soon be leaving his employ. He does not talk to Farfrae about this beforehand, nor does he explicitly fire Farfrae. However, Farfrae can tell from Henchard’s mood that it will no longer work to be Henchard’s manager. Farfrae’s decency is shown in his quietness about this problem. When it is addressed, he simply tells others that “Mr. Henchard no longer required his help.” He doesn’t speak ill of Henchard, despite having been mistreated by him, which shows his respectable and kind character.

Henchard, on the other hand, has acted rashly, which he later realizes, and then attempts to retract his statement that Farfrae should leave his employ. Although Henchard is sober at the time of his rash statement, a clear parallel can be drawn between this scene and the scene in which Henchard sells his wife and child. In both cases, Henchard later regrets his behavior and attempts to reverse the situation, but without success. Farfrae’s refusal to return to Henchard’s business is notable because it shows another strong difference in the two men's characters. Farfrae has a strong resolve and does not make decisions lightly, while Henchard repeatedly makes decisions that he later regrets—a trait that mostly hurts himself rather than others.

Chapter 17 Quotes

Hence, when she felt her heart going out to him, she would say to herself with a mock pleasantry that carried an ache with it, "No, no, Elizabeth-Jane--such dreams are not for you!" She tried to prevent herself from seeing him, and thinking of him; succeeding fairly well in the former attempt, in the latter not so completely.

Related Characters: Elizabeth-Jane Newson , Donald Farfrae
Page Number: 110
Explanation and Analysis:

Elizabeth-Jane and Farfrae share a strong connection, but Elizabeth-Jane tries to persuade herself to stop developing romantic feelings for him. She sees Farfrae as her father’s competitor, an idea supported by Henchard’s anger about Farfrae opening a separate business in the same field. Henchard then openly forbids Elizabeth-Jane to see Farfrae, and Elizabeth-Jane heeds her father’s wishes. This quote shows Elizabeth-Jane’s strong sense of duty. She is loyal to her father and obeys his wishes, even when they go against her own desires. Yet despite her attempt to avoid seeing Farfrae and even thinking of him, Elizabeth-Jane’s feelings are clearly too strong to repress.

In Elizabeth-Jane, two types of love are at odds. She feels love and loyalty to Henchard, even though she doesn’t yet know the story of his past with her mother or that he believes himself to be her father. She is grateful to him for taking her and her mother in when they were in need. Yet she also feels a youthful romantic love for Farfrae. Tragically, Henchard’s conflict with Farfrae means Elizabeth-Jane must choose one type of love or the other—in this situation at least, she can't have both.

Chapter 25 Quotes

"I will love him!" she cried passionately; "as for him--he's hot-tempered and stern, and it would be madness to bind myself to him knowing that. I won't be a slave to the past--I'll love where I choose!"

Related Characters: Lucetta Templeman (speaker), Michael Henchard, Donald Farfrae
Page Number: 177
Explanation and Analysis:

Lucetta appears in Casterbridge after Susan’s death and meets Elizabeth-Jane, as well as Henchard, whom she once loved. At first, Elizabeth-Jane is unaware of the connection between Henchard and Lucetta, but when she comes to understand it she and her father agree for once: Lucetta is duty-bound to Henchard because she confessed her love to him and publically displayed her affection. Lucetta’s feelings change when she meets Farfrae and when she witnesses Henchard’s true character, which she refers to as “hot-tempered” and “stern.” After Henchard forces Lucetta to promise to marry him by threatening that he will otherwise reveal their past relationship, Lucetta must make a pivotal decision.

In this passage, Lucetta is torn between the emotion she feels in the present and her sense of duty to actions in the past. Tension between past and present, in which the past influences the present, is a common motif in this novel. Henchard and Susan feel guilt about the past and let it guide their actions in the present. Lucetta rejects this—throwing away her sense of duty to Henchard—and chooses to follow romantic love for Farfrae. She says she won’t be “a slave to the past,” as she believes that to live according to the past leads to unhappiness. It is certainly true that Elizabeth-Jane, guided by feelings of duty, is unhappy. Lucetta rejects duty in favor of happiness, partly because of romantic love and partly because she sees Henchard’s poor character and feels it would be “madness” to marry him.

Chapter 29 Quotes

Married him?" said Henchard at length. "My good--what, married him whilst--bound to marry me?" "It was like this," she explained, with tears in her eyes and quavers in her voice; "don't--don't be cruel! I loved him so much, and I thought you might tell him of the past--and that grieved me! And then, when I had promised you, I learnt of the rumor that you had--sold your first wife at a fair like a horse or cow! How could I keep my promise after hearing that?”

Related Characters: Michael Henchard (speaker), Lucetta Templeman (speaker), Donald Farfrae
Page Number: 209
Explanation and Analysis:

The truth of Henchard’s treatment of Susan in the past is revealed to the occupants of Casterbridge when the furmity-woman is on trial. One consequence of this is Henchard’s further decline in popularity, and another is Lucetta’s secret marriage to Farfrae. Lucetta confesses the truth to Henchard with “tears in her eyes” and a “quaver in her voice.” Her emotions may be the result of fear of Henchard’s reaction, guilt over her actions, or an attempt to gain his sympathy for her plight. She implores him to not be cruel and to attempt to understand that she saw herself released from her promise once she learned the truth about his past.

Lucetta’s motivation for her secret marriage shows in two ways that the past cannot ever be entirely overcome, overlooked, or forgiven. First, she is unable to think that Henchard might have changed in twenty-five years. She sees the actions of his past as a permanent mark of his character. She speaks of his actions in the most horrifying terms, equating his sale of his wife to treating her like a horse or cow. This is an accurate assessment, but one that overlooks Henchard’s later reunion with and kindness toward Susan and Elizabeth-Jane. Henchard’s past has come back to haunt him, preventing him from being with this woman he loves and wants to marry. Second, Lucetta’s secret marriage shows that she believes the past connection between herself and Henchard will mark her unfavorably in the present. She married Farfrae quickly because she worried that he would see her in a negative light if he learned of her past, just as she sees Henchard in a negative light because of his past.

Chapter 32 Quotes

"I have heard that you think of emigrating, Mr. Henchard?" he said. "Is it true? I have a real reason for asking." Henchard withheld his answer for several instants, and then said, "Yes; it is true. I am going where you were going to a few years ago, when I prevented you and got you to bide here. 'Tis turn and turn about, isn't it! Do ye mind how we stood like this in the Chalk Walk when I persuaded 'ee to stay? You then stood without a chattel to your name, and I was the master of the house in corn Street. But now I stand without a stick or a rag, and the master of that house is you."

Related Characters: Michael Henchard (speaker), Donald Farfrae (speaker)
Related Symbols: The Second Bridge
Page Number: 223-224
Explanation and Analysis:

Henchard has fallen dramatically: he has lost his role as mayor, his business, his love, and his home. Farfrae purchases Henchard's home and moves there with Lucetta, strangely reversing his and Henchard’s situations. When these two men meet and share a few words on the street, Henchard acknowledges the irony of this reversal of situation and status. Farfrae is kind to Henchard, as he always has been. He asks about Henchard’s plans to leave Casterbridge, and this highlights another reversal in situation between the two men, who once stood on the street discussing Farfrae’s plans to travel on from Casterbridge. Henchard’s acknowledgement of this situation attributes these changes to fate. It is “turn and turn about,” he says, as if the passage of time alone has caused this change in fortunes. He does not admit any fault of his own character in his fall from grace, excluding his bitterness and jealousy, his rash decisions, or his drinking habit that continues to haunt him. His self-destructive tendencies are unacknowledged, and he is left bitter at Farfrae’s rise and his fall.

Chapter 34 Quotes

The truth was that, as may be divined, he had quite intended to effect a grand catastrophe at the end of this drama by reading out the name, he had come to the house with no other thought. But sitting here in cold blood he could not do it. Such a wrecking of hearts appalled even him. His quality was such that he could have annihilated them both in the heat of action; but to accomplish the deed by oral poison was beyond the nerve of his enmity.

Related Characters: Michael Henchard, Donald Farfrae, Lucetta Templeman
Page Number: 244
Explanation and Analysis:

Henchard plans to tell Farfrae of his past romantic connection with Lucetta in the hope of turning Farfrae against his wife and poisoning their relationship. To this end, he reads some of Lucetta’s letters aloud to Farfrae, pretending he simply wants to share these stories with a friend. Farfrae isn’t suspicious of his actions, and is indulgent of a friend’s oddity in reading old love letters. Henchard finds that he cannot, in a calm and measured way, reveal the hurtful truth by reading Lucetta’s name aloud at the end of one of the letters. This quote shows a key aspect of Henchard’s character. He could have “annihilated them both in the heat of action,” meaning he is capable of great cruelty in moments of heightened emotion, but he cannot be cruel when his emotions are not stirred. In this calm atmosphere, when he is not provoked by Farfrae, it is “beyond the nerve of his enmity” to inflict great pain. “Enmity” means hostility, which he feels towards both Farfrae and Lucetta, and the “nerve of his enmity” describes what Henchard is capable of doing due to his hatred.

This passage draws an important distinction about Henchard's character. Henchard is more likely to be self-destructive than destructive to others, because he cannot inflict pain “in cold blood.” Hurting others often requires forethought, but Henchard mostly lashes out when emotional, and his anger is often public, which turns other people against his anger to hurt himself more than anyone else.

Chapter 38 Quotes

"Now," said Henchard between his gasps, "this is the end of what you began this morning. Your life is in my hands." "Then take it, take it!" said Farfrae. "Ye've wished to long enough!" Henchard looked down upon him in silence, and their eyes met. "O Farfrae!--that's not true!" he said bitterly. "God is my witness that no man ever loved another as I did thee at one time....And now--though I came here to kill 'ee, I cannot hurt thee! Go and give me in charge--do what you will--I care nothing for what comes of me!"

Related Characters: Michael Henchard (speaker), Donald Farfrae (speaker)
Page Number: 271
Explanation and Analysis:

Henchard attempts to interrupt the proceedings of a formal event greeting a royal personage in Casterbridge, but he is bodily removed by Farfrae, and then he overhears Lucetta speaking ill of him to others. This is the final straw for Henchard who, in anger and bitterness, seeks out Farfrae and attacks him. The two men struggle and Henchard gains the upper hand, but finds that he cannot kill Farfrae. Farfrae says that he knows Henchard has long desired to take his life. This comment interrupts Henchard’s anger because it isn’t true. This is a turning point in Henchard’s understanding of himself: he moves past anger at another to anger at himself. He realizes how much he is to blame for his own situation because he once loved a man he now wants to kill. Farfrae has not changed, but Henchard has changed how he feels about him.

Henchard’s is not generally a sympathetic character, because he brings many of his misfortunes upon himself through self-destructive behavior and cruelty toward others. This quote is a rare moment of vulnerability for Henchard, which shows him in a new light to the reader and evokes more sympathy than usual. Henchard must have been deeply hurt in order to want to lash out against someone he cared for. He cannot overcome his past actions, but he begins to feel a new type of remorse, self-hatred, and self-awareness.

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Donald Farfrae Character Timeline in The Mayor of Casterbridge

The timeline below shows where the character Donald Farfrae appears in The Mayor of Casterbridge. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 7
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...the position of manager of his business. The Scottish man instead introduces himself as Donald Farfrae, saying he is passing through town on his way to Bristol to seek passage to... (full context)
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Henchard is grateful for the note Farfrae gave him, and asks if he’d be willing to prove the contents of the note:... (full context)
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Farfrae will not accept payment for the technique, and Henchard is again impressed by this kindness... (full context)
Chapter 8
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Elizabeth-Jane and Susan finish their meal in silence, consumed by their own thoughts. Donald Farfrae descends to the general company downstairs, and Elizabeth-Jane, after carrying down his tray, as well... (full context)
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Solomon Longways and Christopher Coney, two local men, call upon Farfrae to sing again, and exclaim over the song, which speaks of Farfrae’s homeland of Scotland.... (full context)
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Elizabeth-Jane admires Farfrae and agrees with the general disappointment at his brief stay in Casterbridge. She feels that... (full context)
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...very respectable young man. Henchard, who has wandered past the inn after his meeting with Farfrae, overhears the young man singing, and wishes he could have convinced him to stay and... (full context)
Chapter 9
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...Elizabeth-Jane opens their window to discover a conversation occurring between Henchard, in the street, and Farfrae, at the next-door window. Farfrae is departing and Henchard offers to walk with him to... (full context)
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Elizabeth-Jane enters the office to find not Henchard, but Farfrae, pouring over some samples. Momentarily confused, Elizabeth-Jane recovers and asks to see Henchard. At the... (full context)
Chapter 12
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Henchard returns home, and sees a light on in the office where Farfrae is still hard at work. Henchard admires Farfrae’s skill at overhauling the business’s books, as... (full context)
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Henchard wishes to tell Farfrae about a family matter, saying that he is a lonely man, and that he might... (full context)
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Henchard tells Farfrae of his commitment to another woman who had nursed him one autumn when he fell... (full context)
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...to marry the woman who had cared for him was followed directly by Susan’s reappearance. Farfrae is baffled by Henchard’s complicated circumstances, which far exceed his own straightforward experiences. Henchard feels... (full context)
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Henchard concludes his tale by telling Farfrae about his daughter and her ignorance of her own past. Despite Farfrae’s advice to tell... (full context)
Chapter 13
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...the other hand, is happy to leave more and more of the business management to Farfrae. (full context)
Chapter 14
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Meanwhile, Henchard’s business thrives with Farfrae’s management. Farfrae meticulously replaces Henchard’s method of making verbal promises and remembering everything with ledgers... (full context)
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Elizabeth-Jane also notes how Farfrae looks at her and her mother, as they walk together. She is slightly disappointed and... (full context)
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Elizabeth-Jane arrives at the granary and waits, only to see Farfrae appear. She hides in the granary itself, not wishing to meet him directly, out of... (full context)
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Elizabeth-Jane assumes Farfrae had arranged to meet her and she shows him the note she received. He shows... (full context)
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Farfrae delicately points out that Elizabeth-Jane’s dress is covered in wheat husks from the granary. He... (full context)
Chapter 15
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Elizabeth-Jane, although she now draws Donald Farfrae’s gaze, is still not noticed by the townspeople until her dress evolves to contrast the... (full context)
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...may have gained the admiration of those types whose admiration is not worth having. But Farfrae, too, admires her. However, Elizabeth-Jane feels, after consideration, that she is admired for her appearance,... (full context)
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Henchard and Farfrae continue their close friendship, and yet the disagreement that would break apart their friendship is... (full context)
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...man to head to granary—never mind his breeches—or that he would be fired that day. Farfrae encounters the half-dressed Abel in the yard before Henchard returns. Unimpressed with the situation, Farfrae... (full context)
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Farfrae and Henchard privately converse, and Farfrae entreats him not to behave in this tyrannical way.... (full context)
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...in Casterbridge, is the most admired no longer. A farmer in Durnover sends for Mr. Farfrae to value a haystack, but the child delivering the message meets Henchard instead. At Henchard’s... (full context)
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Henchard goes to value the hay in Durnover and meets Farfrae along the route. Farfrae accompanies him, singing as he walks, but he stops as they... (full context)
Chapter 16
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Henchard grows more reserved toward Farfrae, no longer putting his arm around the young man, or inviting him to dinner. Otherwise,... (full context)
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...the town applauds when they heard that he plans to pay for it all himself. Farfrae, on the other hand, plans to charge a small price per head for admission to... (full context)
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...climbing, a space for boxing and wrestling, and a tea free for everyone. Henchard views Farfrae’s awkward tent construction and feels confident that his own preparations are more exciting and extravagant. (full context)
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...do not arrive, and Henchard learns upon questioning one man that nearly everyone is at Farfrae’s celebration. (full context)
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...down his celebrations and returns home. At dusk, he walks outside and follows others to Farfrae’s tent. The ingeniously constructed pavilion creates a space for a band and for the dance... (full context)
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Back in the tent, Elizabeth-Jane is dancing with Farfrae. After the dance, she looks to Henchard for fatherly approval, but instead he fixes an... (full context)
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By the next morning, Henchard’s jealous temper has passed and he regrets his pronouncement that Farfrae would soon leave his employ. However, he finds that the young man is determined to... (full context)
Chapter 17
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After Henchard’s departure from Farfrae’s celebrations, Elizabeth-Jane remains for a brief while, distressed that she in someway must have offended... (full context)
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Elizabeth-Jane lets out a quiet sigh of disappointment when she fears that Farfrae will leave for another part of the world. Farfrae impulsively says that he wishes he... (full context)
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At home, Elizabeth-Jane ponders over Farfrae’s unwillingness to ask her the question that he might have. She had observed his growing... (full context)
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Word spreads through Casterbridge that Farfrae has purchased a small-scale corn and wheat merchant business in Casterbridge. He does not plan... (full context)
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Henchard is furious at what he perceives to be Farfrae’s betrayal in setting up competition with himself. He vows that he will overbid Farfrae and... (full context)
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Farfrae sets up his business far from Henchard’s, on Durnover Hill. He feels there is room... (full context)
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Every Saturday, the once-friends encounter each other at the marketplace. Whereas Farfrae is always friendly, Henchard angrily storms by him. Farfrae’s name is no longer used in... (full context)
Chapter 18
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...Susan confesses that she was the one who sent the matching notes to Elizabeth-Jane and Farfrae with the hope that they would get to know each other, and one day marry.... (full context)
Chapter 20
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...Elizabeth-Jane continues her quiet and lonely existence, crushing, through force of will, her interest in Farfrae whom she had been forbidden to see. (full context)
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At home, Henchard is particularly upset. His term for mayor is ending and Farfrae will be selected as a member of the Council, rather than himself. He also has... (full context)
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Henchard contemplates his decision to warn Farfrae away from Elizabeth-Jane when he thought her his own daughter, whereas he now wishes his... (full context)
Chapter 22
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...market day, and the two women watch the action below in the square. Elizabeth-Jane observes Farfrae and then her father as the pair encounters each other, and Henchard clearly refuses to... (full context)
Chapter 23
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...not mean to so surprise her. Lucetta encourages the man, who she learns is Mr. Farfrae, to stay and sit now that he has come to call. There is something in... (full context)
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Farfrae’s appearance at High-Place Hall is the result of Henchard’s note to him that he could... (full context)
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Farfrae and Lucetta observe a disagreement occurring outside of the window. A farmer is hiring an... (full context)
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...window, they overhear another conversation as a young farmer says he was supposed to meet Farfrae at the fair, but has not seen him. Farfrae says he must go, but still... (full context)
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As Farfrae leaves, Lucetta says eagerly that he should not heed any gossip he may hear about... (full context)
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Minutes after Farfrae’s departure, Henchard calls with the message that he is only able to make a brief... (full context)
Chapter 24
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...day, Lucetta and Elizabeth-Jane are inevitably at home, watching from their windows the maneuvers of Farfrae in the marketplace. He, however, never glances towards their window. Elizabeth-Jane does not guess how... (full context)
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Lucetta and Elizabeth-Jane meet Farfrae who is inspecting the machine, which was purchased at his recommendation. Elizabeth-Jane feels in the... (full context)
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After seeing how Farfrae acted around Lucetta, Elizabeth-Jane pays special attention to Lucetta’s actions and discovers a time when... (full context)
Chapter 25
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Farfrae calls upon Lucetta, and while Lucetta insists that Elizabeth-Jane join them, Elizabeth-Jane is fully aware... (full context)
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A wagon of Farfrae’s, accompanied by the man himself, passes by the window, and if Henchard had been looking... (full context)
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...slave to the past by binding herself to Henchard, but instead that she will love Farfrae. (full context)
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Elizabeth-Jane observes both Farfrae and Henchard’s love for Lucetta and her own invisibleness in comparison. She feels that such... (full context)
Chapter 26
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One spring morning, Henchard and Farfrae pass each other on the street. Despite their cold relationship, Henchard stops to ask Farfrae... (full context)
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Henchard seeks another meeting with Lucetta and at this visit he intentionally mentions Farfrae’s name in order to see her reaction. During Henchard’s visit, Farfrae himself arrives, and during... (full context)
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...man who he had originally considered for the position of his business manager before meeting Farfrae, Joshua Jopp. Jopp has remained in Casterbridge living in poor circumstances, and readily accepts the... (full context)
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Henchard tells Jopp that they must drive Farfrae out of business by fair competition. Jopp dislikes Farfrae for having previously claimed his position... (full context)
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...indicate a poor wheat crop that year, which favors Henchard and Jopp’s plan for driving Farfrae out of business. The farmers and the villagers of Casterbridge and the surrounding area depend... (full context)
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Farfrae sees Henchard in the marketplace and expresses his concern over Henchard’s business situation, hoping that... (full context)
Chapter 27
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The low prices of grain cause Farfrae to buy after Henchard has resold his grain and lost a significant amount of money.... (full context)
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Henchard frets that Farfrae will soon be mayor, stepping up to fill the leadership position in town that Henchard... (full context)
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Henchard arrives and, seeing the state of his wagon, yells at Farfrae’s man. Elizabeth-Jane and Lucetta run down into the street, and Lucetta says that they saw... (full context)
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...prior engagement. Henchard hides nearby and watches her door, and at nine o’clock he sees Farfrae arrive and leave on a walk with Lucetta. (full context)
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...face-to-face hides in the field where they are walking and overhears their conversation. He hears Farfrae’s expression of his strong feelings and Lucetta’s commitment to him, although she asks if they... (full context)
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Lucetta bitterly agrees, and had she settled upon any man other than Farfrae, Henchard might have taken pity upon her in that moment. Elizabeth-Jane is sent for to... (full context)
Chapter 29
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As she returns to the road, Elizabeth-Jane encounters Farfrae driving a wagon. She tells him what has happened and he gives her a ride... (full context)
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...do this, and, eventually confesses that Mr. Grower was a witness of her marriage—to Mr. Farfrae when they married that very week in Port-Bredy. (full context)
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Henchard bursts out angrily that Lucetta would marry Farfrae while bound in agreement to him. Lucetta says she knew she had to secure Farfrae... (full context)
Chapter 30
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Farfrae’s plans to move, as he discussed with his servants, are a transition to joining Lucetta... (full context)
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...Lucetta corrects her, and invites her to still live in the house with herself and Farfrae. With great self-control, Elizabeth-Jane asks that she be allowed to consider the decision alone. She... (full context)
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...departs. The town is celebrating the news of the marriage, and debating whether or not Farfrae will quit his business and set up on his wife’s money, or continue as a... (full context)
Chapter 31
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Elizabeth-Jane sees that Henchard’s wagons have been painted over with Farfrae’s name. She sees Abel Whittle at work, and he tells her that Farfrae has purchased... (full context)
Chapter 32
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...into the water when Jopp arrives and greets him. Jopp tells Henchard that Lucetta and Farfrae have moved into their new house, which is Henchard old house. Farfrae has also purchased... (full context)
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After Jopp leaves and Henchard remains at the bridge, a gig passes and Farfrae jumps out. He stays to speak to Henchard and asks if it’s true that he... (full context)
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...is across from Henchard’s old home, is now in close proximity to the lives of Farfrae and Lucetta. Elizabeth-Jane avoids looking across the street as much as possible, as she occupies... (full context)
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Henchard appreciates and cares more for Elizabeth-Jane. He is able to seek work at Farfrae’s business, and is immediately employed. Farfrae wishes to help Henchard as much as possible, but... (full context)
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Henchard hears a rumor that Farfrae will be elected as mayor soon. As Henchard works, Farfrae’s replacement of himself in reputation,... (full context)
Chapter 33
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...and the choir members say they will offer a hymn. Henchard looks outside and sees Farfrae passing in the street with Lucetta on his arm. (full context)
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...psalm describe a cursed man who dies and leaves little prosperity or happiness behind him. Farfrae and Lucetta pass by again and Henchard, indicating Farfrae, says that he is the man... (full context)
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...they walk home, Henchard repeats the ending of the sung psalm. He says aloud that Farfrae has taken everything away from him and that he must meet him. Elizabeth-Jane is alarmed... (full context)
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...at her foolishness in writing him such a letter, which he could easily show to Farfrae, before throwing the letter into the fire. (full context)
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...out to drink alcohol. One day, on this errand, she arrives to find Henchard and Farfrae both working on the top floor of the corn stores. As she watches, she sees... (full context)
Chapter 34
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The next morning, Elizabeth-Jane rises early and meets Farfrae as he leaves his house. She says that she has something to tell him about... (full context)
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Elizabeth-Jane leaves Farfrae, unhappy that she has not been able to impress upon him the seriousness of the... (full context)
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Farfrae feels obligated to keep Henchard in his employ, as the man was his friend for... (full context)
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When Farfrae returns home that evening, he is visibly troubled. He confesses to Lucetta that he is... (full context)
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Farfrae and Lucetta are discussing this plan when the current mayor, a Mr. Vatt, arrives at... (full context)
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...letters are most likely still in a safe in his old home, where Lucetta and Farfrae now live. Henchard is already furious about his mistaken information on Farfrae’s willful end to... (full context)
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...prepare himself. He inquires after Lucetta and learns she is already in bed. Henchard asks Farfrae if he remembers the woman who had once been interested in Henchard, but whom he... (full context)
Chapter 35
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...evening, but she had not gone to sleep. As the time arrives and passes when Farfrae normally comes to bed, Lucetta decides to get up and see where he is. She... (full context)
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...move in her state of anxiety. Had Henchard revealed the truth before leaving? She wonders. Farfrae arrives upstairs and upon observing that he does not know the truth, Lucetta bursts into... (full context)
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The next day, Lucetta wonders how to parry Henchard’s next attack. She considers telling Farfrae the truth, but is too afraid that he will consider the situation her fault rather... (full context)
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...He promises Lucetta that he will return the letters to her, but cautions her that Farfrae may still discover the truth through someone other than himself. Lucetta says that she hopes... (full context)
Chapter 36
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...word for him with her husband, as Jopp hopes to be offered a position as Farfrae’s working partner. Lucetta says she knows nothing about the issue, and refuses to offer her... (full context)
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...where Henchard asks him to do him a favor by delivering a package to Mrs. Farfrae. He says that he would take it himself, but does not wish to be seen... (full context)
Chapter 37
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Farfrae is now the young Mayor of the town, and, in this position on the council,... (full context)
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...the carriage, reaching out his hand to shake the hand of the royal personage inside. Farfrae, with the mayor’s authority, grabs Henchard and drags him away from the carriage. For a... (full context)
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Mrs. Blowbody, a lady sitting next to Lucetta, asks whether Henchard wasn’t once Farfrae’s patron when he first arrived in Casterbridge. Lucetta exclaims that Farfrae could have found his... (full context)
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...in Mixen Lane. Buzzford mentions the skimmington-ride, which is being planned in Mixen Lane. As Farfrae has risen to such a prominent position in town as the mayor and a man... (full context)
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...the event will occur that very night, so as to stand in sharp contrast to Farfrae and Lucetta’s prominence that day. For Jopp, the plan is not a joke, but his... (full context)
Chapter 38
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...the ladies sat. He overheard Lucetta deny to Mrs. Blowbody that he had ever helped Farfrae. Returning home, he meets Jopp. Jopp says that he too has been snubbed by Lucetta,... (full context)
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Henchard, without forethought and bent on taking drastic measures, goes looking for Farfrae after supper. Henchard walks to Farfrae’s house where he knocks and leaves the message that... (full context)
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Farfrae arrives, singing the old tune he had once sung at The King of Prussia. Henchard... (full context)
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Henchard says that Farfrae should not have insulted him as he did by bodily dragging him away from the... (full context)
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Eventually, Henchard pins Farfrae at the edge, the young man’s head and arm dangling out the door. Henchard gasps... (full context)
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Farfrae leaves and Henchard sits in the loft for a long time, filled with self-reproach. He... (full context)
Chapter 39
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After his fight with Henchard, Farfrae decided to follow his plan of heading to Budmouth, until the letter requesting that he... (full context)
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Longways, Coney, and Buzzford do not want to warn Farfrae directly should they receive any backlash from their friends and neighbors who enjoy the event.... (full context)
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Elizabeth-Jane attempts again to shut the window and block out the skimmington-ride. Lucetta shrieks that Farfrae will see it and never love her again, which will kill her. Lucetta is determined... (full context)
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...doctor arrives and says Lucetta’s fit is serious, in her condition (she is pregnant), and Farfrae must be sent for immediately. They believe that Farfrae has taken the road toward Budmouth,... (full context)
Chapter 40
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...see Elizabeth-Jane and learns that she is not at her home, but with Lucetta at Farfrae’s. Henchard calls there and learns how ill Lucetta is, and that Farfrae is being sought... (full context)
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Henchard resolves to seek Farfrae himself. He intercepts Farfrae’s gig on the road from Weatherby as he is heading to... (full context)
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Henchard returns to Farfrae’s house alone, dismayed at this failed attempt to do something for Farfrae’s good. He asks... (full context)
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Farfrae returns home late and is greatly distressed to see his misinterpretation of Henchard’s motives. Another... (full context)
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Henchard calls at Farfrae’s throughout the night, to check on Lucetta’s condition, but also to see Elizabeth-Jane. Every other... (full context)
Chapter 42
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...wears on and he does not, Henchard grows increasingly dependent upon Elizabeth-Jane’s care and love. Farfrae’s initial instinct to seek revenge upon the leaders of the skimmington-ride is tempered by his... (full context)
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With time, Farfrae is able to put Lucetta’s life and death into perspective, realizing that with the revelation... (full context)
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...Henchard wonders about this, but is distracted by another concern about Elizabeth-Jane when he observes Farfrae looking at her one day. He remembers that Farfrae once showed interest in Elizabeth-Jane in... (full context)
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...observes the two meet and stop to talk on the Budmouth road. He feels that Farfrae means to rob him of Elizabeth-Jane as well, when he thinks Farfrae has already robbed... (full context)
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In Elizabeth-Jane and Farfrae’s conversation on the road, she confesses that she likes to walk that way in order... (full context)
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Henchard vows to himself that he will do nothing to hinder Farfrae’s courtship of Elizabeth-Jane, despite his thoughts and wishes. But when he sees how close the... (full context)
Chapter 43
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The townsfolk of Casterbridge gossip about the engagement between Farfrae and Elizabeth-Jane. The original occupants of The King of Prussia who witnessed the young people’s... (full context)
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Henchard is tormented by Elizabeth-Jane’s silence on the matter of her relationship with Farfrae. He supposes that she must see him as an obstacle to her future happiness given... (full context)
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Elizabeth-Jane thinks her father must be leaving because she wishes to marry Farfrae. He assures her that she may do so, but that he will not come to... (full context)
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Elizabeth-Jane meets Farfrae on her walk back. She tells him that Henchard is gone. Farfrae has a friend... (full context)
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...to put the past behind her. He offers to help pay for the wedding, which Farfrae plans to hold in their own large house. (full context)
Chapter 44
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He arrives at Farfrae’s house that evening and sees the lively proceedings within. He can hear Farfrae’s voice singing.... (full context)
Chapter 45
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Elizabeth-Jane tells Farfrae that she wishes to find Henchard, but when he cannot be found, Elizabeth-Jane remembers that... (full context)
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Elizabeth-Jane and Farfrae follow Abel Whittle to a cottage where they see him enter. When they enter the... (full context)
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Abel shows Elizabeth-Jane and Farfrae a will that Henchard produced before he died. The will does not describe any inheritance,... (full context)