The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie

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Mr. Teddy Lloyd Character Analysis

The art teacher at Blaine, Mr. Lloyd is handsome and sophisticated, half Welsh and half English, with red and gold hair. He lost his left arm during World War I. While they are colleagues together at Blaine, Mr. Lloyd falls deeply in love with Miss Brodie and she with him. But Mr. Lloyd is a married man, and so Miss Brodie renounces her love for him altogether, bestowing it instead on Mr. Lowther. So strong is Miss Brodie’s love for Teddy despite this, however, that she arranges a plot whereby her student Rose Stanley is to become Mr. Lloyd’s lover in her stead. So strong is Mr. Teddy Lloyd’s love for Miss Brodie, in turn, that all of the people he paints portraits of, including the Brodie girls, resemble Miss Brodie herself. Ultimately, Miss Brodie’s plot fails: it is not Rose but Sandy who ends up having a love affair with Mr. Lloyd, in part because Sandy is so interested in Teddy’s obsession with Miss Brodie—an obsession which she shares.

Mr. Teddy Lloyd Quotes in The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie

The The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie quotes below are all either spoken by Mr. Teddy Lloyd or refer to Mr. Teddy Lloyd. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Authority and Social Groups Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Harper Perennial edition of The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie published in 2009.
Chapter 3 Quotes

Sandy caught his [Mr. Teddy Lloyd’s] glance towards Miss Brodie as if seeking her approval for his very artistic attitude and Sandy saw her smile back as would a goddess with superior understanding smile to a god away on the mountain tops.

Related Characters: Sandy Stranger, Mr. Teddy Lloyd
Page Number: 52
Explanation and Analysis:

Teddy Lloyd is, along with Mr. Lowther, one of two male teachers at the school whom the Brodie set intuit has feelings for Miss Brodie. Here, he is giving an art lesson to the students while Miss Brodie watches. He shows the students a painting of a Madonna and Child without any religious awe - only a "very artistic attitude." This surprises the religious girls, and Sandy notices that Mr. Lloyd seems to be "seeking [Miss Brodie's] approval" of his attitude.  

This brief instant confirms Miss Brodie's assertion that she is in her "prime," as well as fanning the flames of sexual curiosity that run unchecked through the Brodie set. Mr. Lloyd's art lesson is ironically less focused on teaching the girls about art and more interested in gauging Miss Brodie's thoughts, which, we see here, overlap with Mr. Lloyd's. They are a "god" and "goddess" above the young heads of their pupils.

This consideration on Mr. Lloyd's part is a very subtle form of courtship, and the fact that Sandy notices it suggests that she has been primed to take an inappropriate interest in Miss Brodie's personal relationships, which, of course, she has. Miss Brodie speaks frequently about her deceased first great love, who, like Mr. Lloyd, was a soldier. Immediately after the lesson, Monica Douglas tells the Brodie set that Mr. Lloyd kissed Miss Brodie. The idea seems impossible to them, but they soon become obsessed with it.

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Chapter 5 Quotes

She [Sandy] began to sense what went to the makings of Miss Brodie who had elected herself to grace in a particular way and with more exotic suicidal enchantment than if she had simply taken to drink like other spinsters who couldn’t stand it any more.


It was plain that Miss Brodie wanted Rose with her instinct to start preparing to be Teddy Lloyd’s lover, and Sandy with her insight to act as informant on the affair. It was to this end that Rose and Sandy had been chose as the crème de la crème.

Related Characters: Miss Jean Brodie, Sandy Stranger, Mr. Teddy Lloyd
Page Number: 116
Explanation and Analysis:

Here, Sandy has a revelation about Miss Brodie's self-elevation as well as Miss Brodie's grand plan for Sandy and Rose. Miss Brodie is a glamorous woman, committed to the idea of a life transfigured and elevated by passion and extraordinary actions. To this end, Miss Brodie has "elected herself to grace" so that she might best control and determine her own fate as well as the fates of her set. She wants to plot the lives of her students like a novelist, or a predestining God.

However, Sandy sees that this control and manipulation is merely an "exotic" version of common actions taken by "other spinsters." While those less imaginative women might "take to drink" to numb the bleakness of their daily lives, Miss Brodie instead finds escape and fantasy in her plans for herself and her girls. The method is different, but the root causes are the same. 

We also see the first explicit sketch of Miss Brodie's plan for her two most promising girls - the insightful Sandy and the instinctive Rose. Miss Brodie wants Rose to begin an affair with Mr. Lloyd - to act as Miss Brodie's erotic proxy. Sandy's job will be to inform Miss Brodie about the affair in satisfying detail. Although she pretends to have elevated ambitions for the "creme de la creme" of her girls, Miss Brodie's actual plan is a sordid, disturbing anticlimax. 

Chapter 6 Quotes

She [Miss Brodie] thinks she is Providence, thought Sandy, she thinks she is the God of Calvin, she sees the beginning and the end. And Sandy thought, too, the woman is an unconscious lesbian. And many theories from the books of psychology categorized Miss Brodie, but failed to obliterate her image from the canvases of one-armed Teddy Lloyd.

Related Characters: Miss Jean Brodie, Sandy Stranger, Mr. Teddy Lloyd
Related Symbols: Mr. Teddy Lloyd’s Portraits
Page Number: 128
Explanation and Analysis:

Mr. Lloyd has become a secondary figure of obsession for Sandy, mainly because he is so clearly infatuated with Miss Brodie, a feeling with which Sandy can't help but empathize. The portraits that Mr. Lloyd paints of the Brodie set have one thing in common: they all look like more like Miss Brodie than their true subjects. Sandy reports this to Miss Brodie, who is predictably pleased with the information. She called herself Mr. Lloyd's Muse, and goes on to speculate on when Rose will take her place as the artist's muse, a veiled reference to the affair that Miss Brodie is attempting to orchestrate. 

Here, we see Sandy grapple openly with a way of understanding Miss Brodie and pinning her down. Sandy is known for her "insight" - her ability to analyze clearly and deeply - and here, we can read her attempts to define Miss Brodie as a way of wrestling control away from her teacher. If she can classify Miss Brodie, then Miss Brodie will lose some of her magnetic power. 

First, Sandy thinks that Miss Brodie has put herself in the position of God. She controls her pupil's fate like the Calvinist God of predetermination, or like an author manipulating characters into pleasing and dramatic narratives. Sandy's next idea - that Miss Brodie is an "unconscious lesbian" - may well be a psychological projection. Sandy herself seems to have homoerotic feelings for Miss Brodie. Her thoughts then become more vague, as she cycles through "many theories" in an attempt to define Miss Brodie. Sandy is ultimately unsuccessful, however, as none of her analytical thinking can erase Miss Brodie from Mr. Lloyd's canvases, and by extension, from his mind as well as Sandy's. 

The more she [Sandy] discovered him [Mr. Lloyd] to be in love with Jean Brodie, the more she was curious about the mind that loved the woman. By the end of the year it happened that she had quite lost interest in the man himself, but was deeply absorbed in his mind, from which she extracted, among other things, his religion as a pith from a husk.

Related Characters: Miss Jean Brodie, Sandy Stranger, Mr. Teddy Lloyd
Page Number: 132
Explanation and Analysis:

Despite Miss Brodie's plans for Rose and Mr. Lloyd to have an affair, it is actually Sandy who begins sleeping with Mr. Lloyd. She does so for several reasons. Mr. Lloyd and Sandy share an obsession with Miss Brodie, which Sandy can use to manipulate Mr. Lloyd (every time she points out that he has accidentally painted Miss Brodie, Mr. Lloyd kisses her). Also, Sandy has long wanted to thwart Miss Brodie's deterministic plans, and becoming Mr. Lloyd's lover in Rose's place is an efficient way of derailing Miss Brodie's attempts to manipulate her life. 

However, as her affair with Mr. Llody continues, Sandy loses interest in "the man himself." Instead, she is consumed by her efforts to understand "the mind that loved [Miss Brodie]." Again, we see "insightful" Sandy throwing the full force of her analytical powers into trying to understand Miss Brodie and the effects she has on people. 

In the course of her study of Mr. Lloyd, Sandy "extract[s]" his religion. Mr. Lloyd is a Roman Catholic. Eventually, Sandy becomes a Roman Catholic nun. Sandy may take an interest in Roman Catholicism for a number of reasons. Perhaps she feels guilty about her affair with Mr. Lloyd and thinks that she can most effectively repent as a Roman Catholic. Or, more persuasively, perhaps she is defying Miss Brodie’s influence by turning to Roman Catholicism, a faith where one cannot just dismiss one’s own guilt as Miss Brodie seems to do. Another option is that in becoming Roman Catholic she becomes like the man whom Miss Brodie loves. Or perhaps it is some messy combination of all of these things.

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Mr. Teddy Lloyd Character Timeline in The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie

The timeline below shows where the character Mr. Teddy Lloyd appears in The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 2
Sexuality, One’s Prime, and Spinsterhood Theme Icon
...to them, one they “had only lately lit upon.” Sandy goes on to say that Mr. Lloyd , the one-armed Art master to the Senior girls at Blaine, has just had a... (full context)
Chapter 3
Sexuality, One’s Prime, and Spinsterhood Theme Icon
...colleagues at the Junior school had been turning against her—all save Mr. Gordon Lowther and Mr. Teddy Lloyd , the only men on the staff. Both “were already a little in love with... (full context)
Sexuality, One’s Prime, and Spinsterhood Theme Icon
Though Mr. Lowther and Mr. Lloyd look like one another, both having red-gold coloring, “habitual acquaintance” proves otherwise. Mr. Lloyd, the... (full context)
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Education vs. Intrusion Theme Icon
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Miss Brodie’s class has up to this point had only one opportunity to size up Mr. Lloyd closely, during an art lesson with Miss Brodie in attendance. The scene is this: Mr.... (full context)
Education vs. Intrusion Theme Icon
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Mr. Lloyd then continues the lesson, turning to a painting of Madonna and Child without any sense... (full context)
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...not long after this that Monica Douglas reports to the Brodie set that she saw Mr. Lloyd kiss Miss Brodie. The other girls don’t really believe her, however, and question her over... (full context)
Sexuality, One’s Prime, and Spinsterhood Theme Icon
...clothes on singing days.” Sandy continues to disbelieve that Monica had seen Miss Brodie kiss Mr. Lloyd ; in fact, only Rose, who is not at all and never will be curious... (full context)
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Religion, Predestination, and Narrative Structure Theme Icon
...this point and is by her own admission past her prime. She tells Sandy that Teddy Lloyd had loved her greatly, but that she had renounced him because he was married, even... (full context)
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...Gaunt, she hypothesized with Jenny that Miss Brodie was having a love affair not with Mr. Lloyd but Mr. Lowther, and Jenny in particular imagined how the two teachers would initiate sexual... (full context)
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...the Braid Hills Hotel. Miss Brodie goes on to tell Sandy that, since she renounced Mr. Lloyd , the love of her prime, she began an affair with Mr. Lowther as a... (full context)
Sexuality, One’s Prime, and Spinsterhood Theme Icon
Religion, Predestination, and Narrative Structure Theme Icon
...Sandy is almost sure that Mr. Lowther loves Miss Brodie and that Miss Brodie loves Mr. Lloyd . The narrator also foreshadows here, although only vaguely, that Rose Stanley later becomes involved... (full context)
Sexuality, One’s Prime, and Spinsterhood Theme Icon
...motivated by something that happened earlier that day: Miss Brodie specifically sent Rose to help Mr. Lloyd carry art supplies back to the classroom and it occurred to Jenny and Sandy that... (full context)
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Religion, Predestination, and Narrative Structure Theme Icon
...Miss Brodie was fitting her old love story about Hugh to her new one involving Mr. Lloyd and Mr. Lowther. Sandy admires this narrative technique, but also feels a “pressing need to... (full context)
Chapter 4
Authority and Social Groups Theme Icon
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Sexuality, One’s Prime, and Spinsterhood Theme Icon
Religion, Predestination, and Narrative Structure Theme Icon
...not have much potential, which makes her girls “feel chosen.” Miss Brodie also inquires about Teddy Lloyd , who teaches the girls’ art class. The girls tell her about their first day,... (full context)
Authority and Social Groups Theme Icon
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During the girls’ visits to Cramond, Miss Brodie asks them many questions about Mr. Lloyd , including about his wife Mrs. Deirdre Lloyd and children, while Mr. Lowther eats looking... (full context)
Authority and Social Groups Theme Icon
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Insight, Instinct, and Transfiguration Theme Icon
...while Miss Brodie prepares a great ham. She asks them, as she often did, about Mr. Lloyd , and they tell her about two portraits in his studio, an amusingly serious one... (full context)
Chapter 5
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Insight, Instinct, and Transfiguration Theme Icon
Fifteen years old at this time, Sandy stands with Mr. Lloyd in his studio admiring the portrait he has done of Rose Stanley in her gym... (full context)
Authority and Social Groups Theme Icon
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Insight, Instinct, and Transfiguration Theme Icon
...up—which she thinks “perhaps a good thing.” While they are together in his studio, however, Mr. Lloyd confides in Sandy that he desires to paint all the Brodie girls, individually and then... (full context)
Sexuality, One’s Prime, and Spinsterhood Theme Icon
Insight, Instinct, and Transfiguration Theme Icon
Sandy then follows Mr. Lloyd downstairs, where she spends most of tea trying to understand her feelings about him kissing... (full context)
Sexuality, One’s Prime, and Spinsterhood Theme Icon
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...love with, and cook for, him. Mr. Lowther broods on the possibility that she prefers Mr. Lloyd ’s long legs to his short ones. (full context)
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Insight, Instinct, and Transfiguration Theme Icon
...unfolding over many years: Rose with her instinct is to have a love affair with Mr. Lloyd , as a great lover above the common moral code, and Sandy with her insight... (full context)
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Religion, Predestination, and Narrative Structure Theme Icon
Insight, Instinct, and Transfiguration Theme Icon
...she talks about or indulges in sex, but because she is popular with the boys. Teddy Lloyd completes a portrait of all the girls, whom “in a magical transfiguration,” all resemble Miss... (full context)
Authority and Social Groups Theme Icon
Sexuality, One’s Prime, and Spinsterhood Theme Icon
...Miss Brodie’s sexual feelings are satisfied by proxy, as her plan for Rose to become Mr. Lloyd ’s lover reaches fulfillment. Miss Brodie claims that, if she wished, she could marry Mr.... (full context)
Sexuality, One’s Prime, and Spinsterhood Theme Icon
Religion, Predestination, and Narrative Structure Theme Icon
Insight, Instinct, and Transfiguration Theme Icon
...term following, Miss Brodie puts her spare energy into her plan for Rose to become Mr. Lloyd ’s lover and for Sandy to become her informant on the affair. “What energy she... (full context)
Chapter 6
Authority and Social Groups Theme Icon
...and Mary take groceries to people living in slums; Jenny is acting; Rose models for Teddy Lloyd , sometimes accompanied by Sandy who toys with the idea of inducing Mr. Lloyd to... (full context)
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Insight, Instinct, and Transfiguration Theme Icon
...Rose shook off her influence. She still confides in Sandy that she thinks Rose and Mr. Lloyd will become lovers, which is not so much a theory as part of Miss Brodie’s... (full context)
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...Lloyd wears. She psychologizes the Lloyds while with them; and when she looks on as Mr. Lloyd paints a portrait of Rose nude, Sandy notices that the image emerging resembles Rose but... (full context)
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Sandy has told Miss Brodie—and Miss Brodie loves to hear it—that all of Mr. Lloyd ’s portraits reflect her. Miss Brodie calls herself Mr. Lloyd’s Muse and predicts that Rose... (full context)
Authority and Social Groups Theme Icon
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...The two instead talk of Miss Brodie: Sandy explains that Rose never did sleep with Teddy Lloyd , that Miss Brodie did indeed love the artist, and so her renunciation of him... (full context)
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...Lloyds’ to sit for her own portrait, sometimes accompanied by Rose. Once, when Sandy and Mr. Lloyd are all alone because his wife and family are away, Sandy tells him that all... (full context)
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During the time of their affair, Mr. Lloyd paints Sandy a little. She tells him that he is making her look like Miss... (full context)
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...last Miss Brodie comes to the point: “‘Rose tells me you have become his [ Mr. Lloyd ’s] lover,’” she says. Sandy says she has, because Mr. Lloyd interests her. Miss Brodie... (full context)
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Mr. Lloyd continues painting accidental portraits of Jean Brodie, even though he recognizes as Sandy does that... (full context)
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The following autumn, Sandy meets Miss Brodie several times, discussing Mr. Lloyd as usual, how his portraits all reflect the lover who renounced him. Miss Brodie tells... (full context)
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...of the year. When she goes to the Lloyds’ to say goodbye, she looks around Mr. Lloyd ’s studio and sees the portraits “on which she had failed to put a stop... (full context)