The Quiet American

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Phuong Hei Character Analysis

Phuong Hei is a young, beautiful Vietnamese woman, for whom Thomas Fowler and Alden Pyle compete throughout The Quiet American. Although Fowler and Pyle often treat her as an “object”—a prize to be fought over—Greene suggests that Phuong is an intelligent, motivated woman, capable of making up her own mind about the political climate in Vietnam, as well as her feelings for the two men in her life. Because the novel is narrated by Fowler, Greene gives us limited access to Phuong’s thoughts and feelings, and ultimately, she’s a mystery to us.

Phuong Hei Quotes in The Quiet American

The The Quiet American quotes below are all either spoken by Phuong Hei or refer to Phuong Hei . For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Vietnam and the West Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Penguin Books edition of The Quiet American published in 2004.
Part 1, Chapter 1 Quotes

Pyle was very earnest and I had suffered from his lectures on the Far East, which he had known for as many months as I had years. Democracy was another subject of his—he had pronounced and aggravating views on what the United States was doing for the world. Phuong on the other hand was wonderfully ignorant; if Hitler had come into the conversation she would have interrupted to ask who he was. The explanation would be all the more difficult because she had never met a German or a Pole and had only the vaguest knowledge of European geography, though about Princess Margaret of course she knew more than I. I heard her put a tray down on the end of the bed.

Related Characters: Thomas Fowler (speaker), Alden Pyle , Phuong Hei
Page Number: 4
Explanation and Analysis:

In this section, we're introduced to the dynamic between the three central characters of the novel, Fowler, Pyle, and Phuong. Fowler is a wise, experienced British journalist--world-weary, a heavy drinker, and, it's been suggested, a self-portrait of Greene himself. Pyle, by contrast, is young, optimistic, and energetic. He's been reading pseudo-Marxist literature, which has convinced him to use violence to install a new form of government in Vietnam, where the novel is set. Greene conveys the imbalance between Pyle and Fowler with the phrase "As many months as I had years." The message is clear: Pyle is young and naive, while Fowler is older and more realistic in his thinking.

But what about Phuong? Phuong is young and beautiful, but she's portrayed as hopelessly naive--she doesn't even know who Hitler is. One could say that Phuong is Greene's portrait of Vietnam itself: beautiful but basically ignorant of the outside world, and therefore in need of domination (in every sense of the word) from a Western figure like Fowler or Pyle. (Greene's account of Phuong has been criticized for its sexism--see Themes for more details.)

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I walked back with Phuong towards my flat. I was no longer on my dignity. Death takes away vanity—even the vanity of the cuckold who mustn’t show his pain.

Related Characters: Thomas Fowler (speaker), Alden Pyle , Phuong Hei
Page Number: 13
Explanation and Analysis:

Here Fowler contemplates the death of Alden Pyle, the young, optimistic American agent in Vietnam whom Fowler himself has had a hand in killing. The passage is illuminating because it tell us, first, that Alden and Fowler were competing for the same woman, Phuong, and second, that Pyle has died very recently.

Notice that Greene portrays Fowler as being obsessed with his appearance--he's trying, desperately, to hide his pain at Pyle's death. Furthermore, it's important to notice that Fowler seems to feel some traces of sympathy for Pyle, even though it's implied that he and Pyle were fighting over Phuong. There's an unwritten "code" of honor and respect between men in Greene's books. Fowler is no exception to the code--when Pyle is dead, he shows respect and remorse, whatever he thought of Pyle personally.

That night I woke from one of those short deep opium sleeps, ten minutes long, that seem a whole night’s rest, and found my hand where it had always lain at night, between her legs. She was asleep and I could hardly hear her breathing. Once again after so many months I was not alone, and yet I thought suddenly with anger, remembering Vigot and his eye-shade in the police station and the quiet corridors of the Legation with no one about and the soft hairless skin under my hand, “Am I the only one who really cared for Pyle?”

Related Characters: Thomas Fowler (speaker), Alden Pyle , Phuong Hei
Related Symbols: Alcohol and Opium
Page Number: 14
Explanation and Analysis:

In the final part of the first chapter of the novel, Greene sets up the premise of the book: Fowler is remembering his experiences with Pyle, the mysterious American agent with whom Fowler had a conflicted relationship. It is Fowler's duty (as a journalist, as an older man, as a writer) to record Pyle's life--nobody else is going to do it, after all.

The passage is also strange in the way that it suggests a close relationship between Fowler and Pyle. Fowler seems almost surprised to find himself caring so deeply for Pyle, a man with whom he competed frequently. And Fowler's attitude toward Pyle exemplifies the "Greene code" of masculine behavior: there's a grudging respect between the men in Greene's novels, even if they hate one another. There's also a paternal element in Fowler's attitude toward Pyle--he thinks of himself as a reluctant father-figure to Pyle (perhaps paralleling the way that England could be considered a "father" to the United States, the countries from which the two men respectively come).

Part 1, Chapter 3, Section 1 Quotes

“Do you think I’d really go near their stinking highway? Stephen Crane could describe a war without seeing one. Why shouldn’t I? Its only a damned colonial war anyway. Get me another drink. And then let’s go and find a girl. You’ve got a piece of tail. I want a piece of tail too.”

Related Characters: Bill Granger (speaker), Thomas Fowler , Alden Pyle , Phuong Hei
Related Symbols: Alcohol and Opium
Page Number: 28
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, we meet Bill Granger, an obnoxious journalist with whom Fowler is totally disgusted. Granger is drunk and annoying; moreover, he's totally dismissive of the Vietnamese people, despite the fact that, like Fowler, he's been flown to Vietnam to report on the war. Granger is so unprincipled that he makes up the details of a recent news story he's written on the Vietnam War (which is still in its early stages when the novel takes place).

Granger is an important character in the novel, because he helps us understand Fowler's code of behavior more clearly. Granger and Fowler aren't really so different--they're both drinkers, both writers, and both willing to bend the truth at times. But where Granger thinks of his writing as a mere "racket," good for making money, Fowler thinks of his writing as an almost sacred business--he'd never think of falsifying a story. Furthermore, Fowler is possessed of more respect for Vietnam itself than Granger is--Fowler has come to love a Vietnamese woman, while Granger seems interested in having sex with Vietnamese women, but nothing more.

Part 1, Chapter 3, Section 2 Quotes

“Home?” I said and laughed, and Pyle looked at me as though I were another Granger. Suddenly I saw myself as he saw me, a man of middle age, with eyes a little bloodshot, beginning to put on weight, ungraceful in love, less noisy than Granger perhaps but more cynical, less innocent, and I saw Phuong for a moment as I had seen her first, dancing past my table at the Grand Monde in a white ball-dress, eighteen years old, watched by an elder sister who had been determined on a good European marriage. An American had bought a ticket and asked her for a dance: he was a little drunk—not harmfully, and I suppose he was new to the country and thought the hostesses of the Grand Monde were whores. He held her much too close as they went round the floor the first time, and then suddenly there she was, going back to sit with her sister, and he was left, stranded and lost among the dancers, not knowing what had happened or why. And the girl whose name I didn’t know sat quietly there, occasionally sipping her orange juice, owning herself completely.

Related Characters: Thomas Fowler (speaker), Alden Pyle , Phuong Hei , Bill Granger
Page Number: 32
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, the love triangle between Pyle, Fowler, and Phuong first becomes clear. Somehow, the mere presence of Pyle is enough to make Fowler feel old and ugly--Pyle is so young and handsome that Fowler becomes deeply conscious of his drunkenness, his weight, etc. (he even compares himself to Granger, a man he despises).

The passage sets up the basic dynamic between Pyle and Fowler. As Greene himself acknowledged, Pyle and Fowler could be considered embodiments of their respective countries: as Greene sees it, Great Britain is a lot like Fowler--older and more experienced than the U.S., and possessed of a code of honor that an American could never quite understand--even though America is more successful in the present (as Pyle eventually wins over Phuong).

This passage also contains a remarkably poignant description of how Fowler first met Phuong and fell in love with her. Throughout the book Phuong is a rather problematic and sometimes dehumanized character, and Fowler doesn't always treat her well, but here it's suggested that he was immediately attracted to her precisely because of her individuality and personhood: she "owned herself completely."

Part 1, Chapter 4, Section 2 Quotes

“Of course,” he said without conviction, “she may choose to stay with you.”
“What would you do then?”
“I’d apply for a transfer.”
“Why don’t you just go away, Pyle, without causing trouble?”
“It wouldn’t be fair to her, Thomas,” he said quite seriously. I never knew a man who had better motives…

Related Characters: Thomas Fowler (speaker), Alden Pyle (speaker), Phuong Hei
Page Number: 52
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, the sexual rivalry between Fowler and Pyle comes to its peak. Fowler and Pyle acknowledge that they both love Phuong, and they also decide that they should let Phuong choose between the two of them. To Fowler's amazement, Pyle is being completely principled in his competition--he even believes that abandoning Vietnam would be "unfair" to Phuong. Pyle seems to think of his relationship with Phuong as being completely magnamimous--he loves Phuong because he wants to help her. (In this way, Pyle's relationship with Phuong may be emblematic of the rather deluded American relationship with Vietnam itself.)

Greene draws a stark contrast between Fowler--old, cynical, and devious--and Pyle--who's young and virtuous, but also causes greater harm through his good intentions.

Part 2, Chapter 1 Quotes

Pyle said, “I think I ought to put all my cards on the table. I’m not rich. But when my father dies I’ll have about fifty thousand dollars. I’m in good health—I’ve got a medical certificate only two months old, and I can let her know my blood-group.”
“I don’t know how to translate that. What’s it for ?”
“Well, to make certain we can have children together.” “Is that how you make love in America—figures of income and blood-group?”

Related Characters: Thomas Fowler (speaker), Alden Pyle (speaker), Phuong Hei
Page Number: 69
Explanation and Analysis:

Pyle and Fowler have confronted Phuong, asking her, point-blank, to choose between them. Fowler is put in the odd position of having to translate his romantic rival's statements to Phuong. Here, for instance, Pyle tells Fowler to communicate to Phuong that Pyle has some money and is in good health. Fowler can't help but mock Pyle for his childishness in wooing Phuong--it's certainly a little odd and not very romantic that Pyle is telling Phuong his blood-type as a way of winning her over.

The passage uses comedy to convey the differences between Pyle and Fowler. Pyle may be younger and handsomer than Fowler, but he's a little clueless about how to go about wooing a woman. Fowler, on the other hand, is a little old for Phuong, but she's attracted to his experience and insight. As we should expect by now, Fowler "nationalizes" his criticism of Pyle, suggesting that Pyle's cluelessness in wooing Phuong is representative of America's cluelessness in other similar departments.

She gave me a quick look over the needle and registered her mistake. Then as she kneaded the opium she began to talk at random of what clothes she would wear in London, where we should live, of the tube-trains she had read about in a novel, and the double-decker buses: would we fly or go by sea?
“And the Statue of Liberty…” she said.
“No, Phuong, that’s American too.”

Related Characters: Thomas Fowler (speaker), Phuong Hei
Related Symbols: Alcohol and Opium
Page Number: 73-74
Explanation and Analysis:

In this opium-influenced dialogue, Phuong tells Fowler that she's excited to spend the rest of her life with him. Phuong thinks that she and Fowler are going to get married and travel back to England--there, Phuong looks forward to seeing the famous sights of the Western world.

But as the passage makes clear, Phuong doesn't really understand the first thing about the Western world--she even thinks the Statue of Liberty is in England, rather than America. As Fowler seems to interpret it, Phuong's mistake suggests that some part of her is still more attracted to Pyle the American than to Fowler the Englishman. Ina broader sense, though, Phuong's words make us wonder if she's really in love with either Pyle or Fowler. It's entirely possible that she thinks of Fowler as a means to an end--a way for her to get out of Vietnam and make a better life for herself--rather than a loving husband. Fowler has suggested that he really doesn't know much about Phuong or Phuong's culture, and here, it's implied that Phuong doesn't know anything about Fowler.

Part 2, Chapter 2, Section 3 Quotes

“But she loves you, doesn’t she?”

“Not like that. It isn’t in their nature. You’ll find that out. It’s a cliché to call them children— but there’s one thing which is childish. They love you in return for kindness, security, the presents you give them—they hate you for a blow or an injustice. They don’t know what it’s like—just walking into a room and loving a stranger. For an aging man, Pyle, it’s very secure—she won’t run away from home so long as the home is happy.” I hadn’t meant to hurt him. I only realized I had done it when he said with muffled anger, “She might prefer greater security or more kindness.”

Related Characters: Thomas Fowler (speaker), Alden Pyle (speaker), Phuong Hei
Page Number: 95
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Fowler tells Pyle what he thinks of Phuong. Fowler's words are harsh, bitter, and rather racist--he claims that he doesn't really think of Phuong as an adult at all; rather, he considers her a child. It's interesting to note that Fowler speaks in terms of "them," not "she." Although the supposed subject of his speech is Phuong, he's really talking about Vietnam and Vietnamese people themselves. This is typical of racist ideas--seeing one individual as a representative of his or her race, and making vast generalizations based on personal experience--but it also reinforces the symbolic, allegorical structure of the novel.

Fowler realizes too late that his words are harsh--he genuinely didn't realize that Pyle would be so offended by his callous attitude toward Phuong. Fowler's surprise is a sign that he's grown so accustomed to his own cynicism and callousness that he can barely remember a time when he acted any other way. Pyle, who's still young and romantic, loves Phuong (albeit in his own idealistic and condescending way) and believes that Phuong loves him in return.

Part 2, Chapter 3, Section 3 Quotes

“Yes. I wish you hadn’t written it.”
“Why?”
“Because it was a pack of lies. I trusted you, Thomas.”
“You shouldn’t trust anyone when there’s a woman in the case.”
“Then you needn’t trust me after this. I’ll come sneaking up here when you go out, I’ll write letters in typewritten envelopes. Maybe I’m growing up, Thomas.” But there were tears in his voice, and he looked younger than he had ever done. “Couldn’t you have won without lying?”
“No. This is European duplicity, Pyle. We have to make up for our lack of supplies.”

Related Characters: Thomas Fowler (speaker), Alden Pyle (speaker), Phuong Hei
Page Number: 122
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Pyle confronts Fowler for his deceptions--he's tricked Pyle into thinking that he's going to stay in Vietnam to be with Phuong, when in fact he's going back to England presently. Pyle is genuinely shocked that Fowler would tell him a lie--Pyle is so open and honest that he can't conceive of a grown man with "lower" morals than his own.

Once again, Fowler frames the difference between himself and Pyle in nationalistic terms: Pyle is a representative American, while Fowler is a classic Englishman. Although England is an older, weaker country, it's capable of using its experience and moral deviousness against America--by the same token, Fowler has outmaneuvered Pyle. (The irony of the passage is that Pyle is actually capable of great deviousness--he conspires to murder innocent civilians in Vietnam, as his philosophical beliefs compel him to sacrifice his own strong moral values.)

Part 4, Chapter 3 Quotes

I said to Phuong, “Do you miss him much?”
“Who?”
“Pyle.” Strange how even now, even to her, it was impossible to use his first name. “Can I go, please? My sister will be so excited.”
“You spoke his name once in your sleep.”
“I never remember my dreams.”
“There was so much you could have done together. He was young.”
“You are not old.”
“The skyscrapers. The Empire State Building.”
She said with a small hesitation, “I want to see the Cheddar Gorge.” “It isn’t the Grand Canyon.” I pulled her down on to the bed. “I’m sorry, Phuong.”

Related Characters: Thomas Fowler (speaker), Phuong Hei (speaker), Alden Pyle
Page Number: 180
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Fowler talks to Phuong about Pyle, who’s been killed recently. Fowler, who was partly responsible for Pyle’s death, asks Phuong if she misses Pyle, and Phuong claims that she barely thinks about Pyle at all. Fowler is suspicious of Phuong, and even when she tells him she’s eager to go to England with him, he still feels strangely inadequate.

Fowler is haunted by Pyle’s death. It’s not clear if Phuong has truly forgotten Pyle as she claims, or if she’s secretly missing him (it’s certainly possible that Phuong, as a rather cynical opportunist, has merely latched on to whomever will take her out of Vietnam). In either case, though, it’s clear that Fowler continues to fear that Phuong still loves Pyle. And even though Pyle is dead, and Fowler feared that he was the only one who "cared," Pyle's memory still lives on strongly in Fowler's consciousness.

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Phuong Hei Character Timeline in The Quiet American

The timeline below shows where the character Phuong Hei appears in The Quiet American. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 1, Chapter 1
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...Anxious, Fowler goes down to the street, where he sees a young Vietnamese woman named Phuong waiting on Fowler’s doorstep. “Phuong” means Phoenix in Vietnamese, but Fowler comments that “nothing nowadays... (full context)
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Phuong and Fowler go up to Fowler’s apartment. Phuong speaks in simple French, noticing that Fowler... (full context)
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Phuong tries to comfort Fowler by saying Pyle will be there soon. Fowler wonders what Pyle... (full context)
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Phuong begins the laborious task of preparing an opium pipe for Fowler to smoke. According to... (full context)
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Fowler smokes a second pipe of opium and tells Phuong that when she left him for Pyle, he fell back into heavy opium use. Fowler... (full context)
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Not long after, Fowler and Phuong arrive at the police office. Fowler is still high on opium. The French officer questioning... (full context)
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...his innocence. In the present time—at the French police station’s interrogation room with Vigot and Phuong—Fowler guesses that Pyle is dead, which Vigot confirms. The opium makes Pyle’s death less meaningful... (full context)
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...Pyle, but the narration suggests that the opium is suppressing some feelings of guilt. With Phuong still in the room but silent, Vigot questions Fowler about his whereabouts earlier in the... (full context)
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...him, because he is Roman Catholic, and not a “damned Yankee” like Pyle. Vigot leaves Phuong in the interrogation office and brings Fowler to the morgue to identify the body. Fowler... (full context)
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After meeting with Vigot, Fowler and Phuong walk back to his apartment. Dwelling on thoughts about death, Fowler is no longer concerned... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 2, Section 1
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...a good target for a bomb. Jumping forward to later in the day, Fowler and Phuong have lunch in his apartment. Fowler reveals that that day is the second anniversary of... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 2, Section 2
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Flashing forward to the morning after Phuong stayed with Fowler after Pyle’s death, the two have a casual morning tea and breakfast,... (full context)
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Vigot helps Fowler get Phuong’s box of belongings from under Pyle’s bed. Pyle’s black dog is missing. Fowler teases Vigot... (full context)
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...Pyle end up with an American girl back home. The Attaché knew about Pyle stealing Phuong from Fowler, and says that he was on Fowler’s side in that matter. Fowler walks... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 3, Section 1
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The narration flashes back to the first time Pyle met Phuong, an early evening at the Continental Hotel. Fowler sits with Phuong at a table, silently... (full context)
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...the unknown drunken man, whom Granger nicknames “Mick,” over to Pyle’s table where Pyle, Fowler, Phuong, and the Attaché are sitting. Granger hits on Phuong and makes Fowler defensive. Granger then... (full context)
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...each other for trade. Granger says he’s going to a brothel. Pyle invites Fowler and Phuong to dinner, and Granger convinces them to eat at a restaurant next to the brothel.... (full context)
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Pyle, Granger, Fowler, and Phuong take trishaws to the Chalet and brothel, The House of the Five Hundred Girls. Alone... (full context)
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...Fowler extracts Pyle from the group of women and brings him to the Chalet, where Phuong has been waiting. (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 3, Section 2
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In the Chalet, Phuong, Fowler and Pyle sit near the dance floor. The orchestra plays an out-of-date Parisian song.... (full context)
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Phuong’s sister, Miss Hei, enters the Chalet while Pyle and Phuong are dancing. She joins Fowler... (full context)
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...the idea of permanence. He likens the inevitability of the end of his relationship with Phuong to the inevitability of death. He both envies and distrusts religious people, and believes death... (full context)
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Pyle and Phuong return to the table after their second dance. Pyle speaks about Phuong as if she... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 4, Section 1
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Chapter 4 begins a few days after Fowler, Phuong, and Pyle’s night of dinner and dancing at the Chalet. Fowler has flown to Phat... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 4, Section 2
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...tells Fowler that he’s come to find Fowler himself. Pyle has fallen in love with Phuong, he explains. Fowler finds this hilarious—he wonders aloud why Pyle couldn’t have waited a week... (full context)
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...name, which is Thomas. Pyle, calling Fowler “Tom,” tells Fowler that he’s going to ask Phuong to marry him. Fowler is dismissive of this news, though he feels envious when Pyle... (full context)
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...in bed, they hear the sounds of bombs in the distance. Pyle continues speaking about Phuong, and he tells Fowler that they both have Phuong’s “interests” in mind. Fowler angrily disagrees,... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 1
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...Saigon, and Pyle has “invited himself” for a drink. Fowler sits in his home with Phuong, who has no idea that he’s planning to leave Vietnam and return to England. Phuong... (full context)
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After Phuong leaves, Fowler writes a letter to his employers, arguing that, for the “good of the... (full context)
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Fowler asks Pyle if he’ll be “sensible” and mentally stable if Phuong were to die, and Pyle replies that he would—he’d continue to serve the government of... (full context)
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After a long pause, Fowler asks Phuong if she’s going to leave him for Pyle. He explains that he’ll be unable to... (full context)
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As Pyle and Fowler argue, Phuong suddenly says, “No.” Pyle, surprised, asks Phuong, in clumsy French, if she’ll come away with... (full context)
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Alone with Phuong, Fowler goes to write a letter to his wife, Helen. In the letter, he tells... (full context)
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Finishing his letter, Fowler goes to bed with Phuong. In bed, he tells Phuong that he’s been ordered home, and that he wants her... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 2, Section 1
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...several times since arriving in Tanyin. Pyle is always friendly to Fowler, and inquires about Phuong frequently. Seeing Fowler, Pyle greets him warmly. He’s eating a “Vit-Health” sandwich, which his mother... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 2, Section 2
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...are driving away from the Caodaist festival. In the car, Pyle raises the topic of Phuong. He explains that he’s applied for a transfer out of Saigon, and asks Fowler if... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 2, Section 3
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...time drags on, very slowly. Pyle confesses to Fowler that he can’t stop thinking about Phuong. Fowler thinks that Pyle is as innocent as a dog. Pyle confesses that he’s “never... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 2, Section 4
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...intention of dying. Pyle explains that he saved Fowler’s life because he couldn’t have looked Phuong in the eyes if he’d let Fowler die. He tells Fowler that he’ll try to... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 3, Section 1
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...since he and Pyle escaped the fort. In advance of his return, Fowler has sent Phuong a telegram explaining that he is going to be back in to Saigon soon. (full context)
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When he arrives at his home, Fowler finds Phuong waiting for him. She tells him to lie down and rest, and adds that he’s... (full context)
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...divorce him—both because of her religious convictions and because she sympathizes with “the poor girl” (Phuong) whom Fowler has claimed to love. She suggests that Fowler must already be planning to... (full context)
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...reading his wife’s letter, without displaying any outward signs of his distress or anger. When Phuong asks what Helen has said, Fowler says that he doesn’t know—Helen hasn’t made up her... (full context)
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Later in the evening, Phuong and Fowler go to buy scarves and clothes. As Fowler waits outside a store for... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 3, Section 3
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...but ultimately he gets up and opens the door. There, he finds Pyle standing with Phuong. Pyle accuses Fowler of lying to Phuong: Phuong’s sister, who can read English, has learned... (full context)
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Pyle tearfully accuses Fowler of manipulating him, along with Phuong, for his own selfish needs. Fowler doesn’t deny any of this. Pyle says that Fowler... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 1, Section 1
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Vigot and Fowler continue to talk and gamble. Vigot asks Fowler about Phuong, and Fowler replies that he and Phuong are “all right,” but then admits that they’ve... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 1, Section 2
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...Pyle left Fowler’s home. In the weeks afterwards, Fowler would sometimes come home to find Phuong, and sometimes he’d go days without seeing her. Fowler suspects that she’s going to see... (full context)
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...and thinks that it’s better for Pyle to “play with plastic” than to concentrate on Phuong. Shortly after he finishes his story, Fowler goes to visit Mr. Moui, the man Mr.... (full context)
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...Because there is no one in the warehouse, Fowler leaves and returns to his home. Phuong is not there, and it seems to Fowler that she has taken some of her... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 1, Section 4
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Shortly after discovering that Phuong has left him for Pyle, Fowler decides to go north of Saigon, where he has... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 1, Section 5
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...in bed with the prostitute, he realizes that she is wearing the same perfume as Phuong. He finds that he can’t perform sexually with her. He apologizes and blames his impotence... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 2, Section 1
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...his home, he is surprised to find Pyle waiting for him, in the chair where Phuong always used to sit. Pyle explains that Joe told him that Fowler went to the... (full context)
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Fowler asks Pyle if he and Phuong are married yet—Pyle says that they’re not, and that he’s trying to find a way... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 2, Section 2
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...where Fowler is standing. A restaurant collapses, shooting broken glass everywhere. Suddenly, Fowler realizes that Phuong must be in the milk bar near the building that has just blown up—it’s her... (full context)
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...Pyle’s voice—Pyle is trying to move through the crowds as well. Fowler tells Pyle that Phuong is in the milk bar, and may have been injured. Pyle replies that he warned... (full context)
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...has no qualms about killing dozens of Vietnamese innocents. He dares Pyle to admit to Phuong what he’s done. In response, Pyle can only murmur that Thé would never have caused... (full context)
Part 4, Chapter 1
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Part Four begins shortly after Pyle’s death. Fowler has given Phuong money to take her sister to the movies—it’s not explained why he’s done this, except... (full context)
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...to have seen—Robin Hood. With this, he walks out. Alone, Fowler drinks and thinks about Phuong and Pyle. He admits the truth to himself: he did see Pyle the night he... (full context)
Part 4, Chapter 2, Section 3
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...Fowler will get “the accent” wrong. They part, uncertainly. Fowler leaves the restaurant, and finds Phuong waiting for him on the street outside. (full context)
Part 4, Chapter 3
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The final chapter begins shortly after Vigot questions Fowler about Pyle’s death. Phuong has returned from the film Fowler sent her to see. Phuong mentions that she saw... (full context)
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Fowler notices the copy of The Role of the West on his bookshelf. He asks Phuong if she misses Pyle at all, and tells her that she says his name in... (full context)
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Phuong and Fowler kiss. Fowler thinks: everything has gone right since Pyle’s death. Nevertheless, Fowler wishes... (full context)