The Screwtape Letters

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Because The Screwtape Letters is told from the perspective of a devil like Screwtape, God is almost always referred to as The Enemy. In spite of his antagonistic role in the novel, God inspires a great deal of Screwtape’s moral theorizing. Screwtape accuses God of wanting humans to be separate from him—in other words, free—and yet united with him in their Christian faith. Screwtape also grudging acknowledges that God loves humanity—at least until Wormwood reports this “heresy” to the authorities of Hell. In the end, Screwtape regards God as a mystery, concluding that his love for mankind must involve some secret plan. Much of the comedy in The Screwtape Letters arises from the reader’s recognition that there is no secret plan behind God’s love—he loves mankind, and that is all.

God Quotes in The Screwtape Letters

The The Screwtape Letters quotes below are all either spoken by God or refer to God . For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Proving Christianity True by Exploring Evil Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Harper edition of The Screwtape Letters published in 2001.
Letter II Quotes

He has a curious fantasy of making all these disgusting little human vermin into what He calls His "free" lovers and servants—"sons" is the word He uses, with His inveterate love of degrading the whole spiritual world by unnatural liaisons with the two-legged animals. Desiring their freedom, He therefore refuses to carry them, by their mere affections and habits, to any of the goals which He sets before them: He leaves them to "do it on their own". And there lies our opportunity. But also, remember, there lies our danger. If once they get through this initial dryness successfully, they become much less dependent on emotion and therefore much harder to tempt.

Related Characters: Screwtape (speaker), Wormwood , God
Page Number: 7
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Screwtape discusses God's "plan." Although he phrases his analysis negatively, it's clear from the reader's perspective that Lewis himself thinks of God positively—the more a devil is supposed to hate something, the more we the readers are supposed to like it.

Screwtape chooses to focus on the principle of free will here. Humans are born in a state of uncertainty: they have the option to embrace God or embrace evil. On one hand, devils have a great advantage over humans: because of their state of limbo, humans can easily be drawn toward the path of evil. But on the other hand, the fact that humans have free will means that when they do choose to embrace God, God is more pleased with the achievement, and offers greater love as a reward.

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Letter V Quotes

But that is where He is so unfair. He often makes prizes of humans who have given their lives for causes He thinks bad on the monstrously sophistical ground that the humans thought them good and were following the best they knew. Consider too what undesirable deaths occur in wartime. Men are killed in places where they knew they might be killed and to which they go, if they are at all of the Enemy's party, prepared. How much better for us if all humans died in costly nursing homes amid doctors who lie, nurses who lie, friends who lie, as we have trained them, promising life to the dying, encouraging the belief that sickness excuses every indulgence, and even, if our workers know their job, withholding all suggestion of a priest lest it should betray to the sick man his true condition!

Related Characters: Screwtape (speaker), Wormwood , God
Page Number: 23
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Lewis offers his own interpretation of Christianity (one that's by no means shared by all Christians). As Lewis sees it, God rewards human beings who sacrifice their lives for a cause they believe to be noble and good, even if God himself considers the cause immoral. In this way, humans who die in battle with good intentions may go to Heaven, no matter which side they're fighting for.

The passage further suggests that most hospitals, in spite of their reputation for kindness and mercy, endanger the souls of human beings by depriving them of the religious care they desperately need, and by lying to them about their true condition. Paradoxically, it's better (in terms of the state of one's soul) for a human being to die in the army than in a modern hospital—at least the army provides chaplains and priests to listen to soldiers' final confessions before they die.

Letter VII Quotes

All extremes, except extreme devotion to the Enemy, are to be encouraged.

Related Characters: Screwtape (speaker), Wormwood , The patient , God
Page Number: 32
Explanation and Analysis:

In this famous passage, Screwtape argues that extremism is always easy to twist into sinfulness (and therefore helpful to the cause of evil)--unless the extremism is a form of devotion to God himself.

There are several senses in which extremism appears to be a danger to the soul. By devoting themselves to an idea or a cause, human beings turn away from God, worshipping a "false idol" instead. No matter what the idol might be—football, Marxism, alcohol, etc.—the implication appears to be that humans are equipped to worship one and only one divine authority. Thus by holding extreme opinions about anything other than God, they're essentially replacing him.

Letter VIII Quotes

He really does want to fill the universe with a lot of loathsome little replicas of Himself—creatures, whose life, on its miniature scale, will be qualitatively like His own, not because He has absorbed them but because their wills freely conform to His. We want cattle who can finally become food; He wants servants who can finally become sons. We want to suck in, He wants to give out. We are empty and would be filled; He is full and flows over. Our war aim is a world in which Our Father Below has drawn all other beings into himself: the Enemy wants a world full of beings united to Him but still distinct.

Related Characters: Screwtape (speaker), Wormwood , God , Satan
Page Number: 38
Explanation and Analysis:

In this passage, Screwtape paints a picture of the universe as God wants it, and as the Devil wants it. Screwtape describes God's world as loathsome and insufferable (although in rather poetic language), though from the reader's perspective it's perfectly clear that God's world is the desirable one, and the Devil's world the loathsome one. As Screwtape says, God gives human beings free will so that they can be "separate" and yet "united" with God: a human who is born in a state of uncertainty and yet chooses to worship God has fulfilled God's plan for him.

In the passage, Lewis cleverly refutes some of the most common objections to the Christian worldview. It's been suggested that Christianity is unimaginative and tyrannical, since it demands that all humans join together in slavish worship of God. Yet Lewis argues that the opposite is true: the Devil wants to pull all human beings to Hell (and, Lewis suggests, eat them), while God wants humans to worship him, but he doesn't want to dominate his own creations. Rather, he gives human beings the gift of free will, so that they'll always be separate and "free" from his control. In choosing God, they actually become more free and more personally fulfilled.

Do not be deceived, Wormwood. Our cause is never more in danger, than when a human, no longer desiring, but intending, to do our Enemy's will, looks round upon a universe from which every trace of Him seems to have vanished, and asks why he has been forsaken, and still obeys.

Related Characters: Screwtape (speaker), Wormwood , God
Page Number: 40
Explanation and Analysis:

As the quotation makes clear, God offers the handsomest rewards to the human beings who continue to obey him even when all comforting emotion and faith has disappeared. (The quote is also a reference to Jesus's words on the cross: "My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?") God brings humans into the world in a state of doubt because he wants humans to choose to worship him, using their powers of free will. An angel who's been created for the purpose of serving God simply isn't as impressive as a human who chooses to do the same—the former has an easy choice, while the latter has a difficult one. This quote in particular emphasizes the ideal of will—it's easy to obey God when one is filled with feelings of faith, love, and satisfaction, but when it seems that God has abandoned the Christian, then it's only his will and conviction that can keep him faithful.

In a broader sense, then, Screwtape, Wormwood, and the other devils are really a crucial part of God's plan for humanity. If the most admired and loved human being is one who continues to obey God even despite doubt and temptation, then Screwtape is crucial to humanity's progress toward Heaven. By making humans doubt God, Screwtape only "sweetens" God's victory when humans eventually see the truth about Christianity.

Letter XV Quotes

Hence nearly all vices are rooted in the future. Gratitude looks to the past and love to the present; fear, avarice, lust, and ambition look ahead. Do not think lust an exception. When the present pleasure arrives, the sin (which alone interests us) is already over. The pleasure is just the part of the process which we regret and would exclude if we could do so without losing the sin; it is the part contributed by the Enemy, and therefore experienced in a Present. The sin, which is our contribution, looked forward.

Related Characters: Screwtape (speaker), Wormwood , God
Page Number: 76-77
Explanation and Analysis:

Through the character of Screwtape, Lewis argues that sin is almost always rooted in thoughts of the future. Humans have a natural instinct to do the right thing—don't hurt other people, don't steal, etc. The only way for humans to justify their sins to themselves is to think ahead to the future. (For example, one could rationalize stealing from a store on the grounds that the "payoff" for the theft outweighs the guilt one feels in the moment.) Evil, then, is both rational and irrational: humans sin because they can convince themselves that somewhere down the line, their evil will be balanced out with good. Yet in sinning, humans are ignoring the most basic and logical thought process imaginable: the notion that one shouldn't do things that make one feel bad.

Letter XIX Quotes

I have been thinking very hard about the question in your last letter. If, as I have clearly shown, all selves are by their very nature in competition, and therefore the Enemy's idea of Love is a contradiction in terms, what becomes of my reiterated warning that He really loves the human vermin and really desires their freedom and continued existence? I hope, my dear boy, you have not shown my letters to anyone. Not that it matters of course. Anyone would see that the appearance of heresy into which I have fallen is purely accidental.

Related Characters: Screwtape (speaker), Wormwood , God
Page Number: 99
Explanation and Analysis:

Screwtape has previously told Wormwood that 1) God loves humans, and 2) love is an impossible idea. As Wormwood rightly points out, 1) and 2) can't both be true—Screwtape has contradicted himself. Here, Screwtape tries to backpedal in order to avoid saying something contradictory to the philosophy of Hell—something which, we're invited to believe, could get Screwtape punished and eaten alive. Screwtape seems genuinely nervous that Wormwood will reveal Screwtape's heresies to other devils. (It's suggested that the devils steadfastly deny the existence of love, and assume that God has some other, more selfish motive for creating and helping humans.)

From the reader's perspective, however, Screwtape's contradiction is proof that Christianity and only Christianity—understood in the simple sense as the doctrine that there is a God, who loves us and wants us to be happy—is the truth. Any doctrine that argues that competition and hatred are the bases for all life will eventually collapse on itself.

Letter XXV Quotes

It is here that the general Evolutionary or Historical character of modern European thought (partly our work) comes in so useful. The Enemy loves platitudes. Of a proposed course of action He wants men, so far as I can see, to ask very simple questions; is it righteous? is it prudent? is it possible? Now if we can keep men asking "Is it in accordance with the general movement of our time? Is it progressive or reactionary? Is this the way that History is going?" they will neglect the relevant questions.

Related Characters: Screwtape (speaker), Wormwood , The patient , God
Page Number: 138-139
Explanation and Analysis:

Screwtape explains that the recent trends in European intellectual life (he seems to be referring to such movements as Marxism, Freudianism, Hegelianism, etc.) are destructive to humanity—in fact, he claims that devils were largely responsible for popularizing such intellectual movements in the first place. The reason that recent trends in intellectual life are so harmful, Screwtape goes on, is that they distract humanity from the basic, relevant questions about the world—questions about right and wrong.

Lewis was a lifelong opponent of the "big three" intellectual doctrines of the 19th century: Marxism, Freudianism, and Darwinism. (See Background Information.) As has been pointed out many times, all three of these ideologies deprived human beings of their free will by arguing that people do things for more complicated and elusive reasons than had previously been assumed. Suddenly, the basic question, "is this the right thing to do?" was replaced by a flurry of other questions: "what social group will benefit?" (Marxism), or "how's your relationship with your mother?" (Freudianism). In Lewis's view, modern ideologies replace truth with a mountain of irrelevant information, distracting human beings from their most basic moral instincts.

Letter XXIX Quotes

There is here a cruel dilemma before us. If we promoted justice and charity among men, we should be playing directly into the Enemy's hands; but if we guide them to the opposite behaviour, this sooner or later produces (for He permits it to produce) a war or a revolution, and the undisguisable issue of cowardice or courage awakes thousands of men from moral stupor.

This, indeed, is probably one of the Enemy's motives for creating a dangerous world—a world in which moral issues really come to the point.

Related Characters: Screwtape (speaker), Wormwood , God
Page Number: 161
Explanation and Analysis:

Through the character of Screwtape, Lewis answers one of the most basic criticisms of Christianity—"If God is perfect, why is the world a dangerous place?" Screwtape begins by giving a reason why it's so difficult for devils to successfully corrupt human beings. On one hand, devils sometimes try to promote chaos and violence among human beings, hoping that an atmosphere of fear and death will promote greater evil. The problem is that in such a time, a larger proportion of humans will demonstrate their bravery and loyalty by recognizing the wicked state of affairs and revolting against it, thereby undermining the original purpose of the devils' plans. No matter what course of action devils take, then, humans will tend to behave morally and go to Heaven.

Screwtape is perceptive enough to realize that God created the world to be a dangerous place precisely so that human beings could prove their loyalty to him. God offers the greatest rewards to the humans who continue to believe in him, in spite of danger—therefore, a flawed, chaotic world is a good one, since it gives humans opportunities to prove their faith.

Letter XXXI Quotes

If only we could find out what He is really up to! Alas, alas, that knowledge, in itself so hateful and mawkish a thing, should yet be necessary for Power! Sometimes I am almost in despair. All that sustains me is the conviction that our Realism, our rejection (in the face of all temptations) of all silly nonsense and claptrap, must win in the end.

Related Characters: Screwtape (speaker), Wormwood , God
Page Number: 175
Explanation and Analysis:

At various points in the book, Screwtape has shown faint signs of believing in Christianity: for example, he can't reconcile the notion that God loves humanity with the notion that love is loathsome or impossible. Screwtape is a perfectly logical creature, meaning that he should be able to see that Christianity is the only logical doctrine. The reason why Screwtape can never be a Christian, however, is that he's incapable of understanding love. As he sees it, the universe is all about competition: one person's victory is always another person's defeat.

In this quotation, Screwtape seems to long for some understanding of God—suggesting, perhaps, that even Devils aspire to go to Heaven. But of course, Screwtape can never really embrace God, because he clings to his belief that Realism--the belief that the world is a competition, with winners and losers--is the truth.

Interestingly, Lewis never really tries to disprove Screwtape's Realism. One could say that Realism is a premise of Screwtape's argument, used to prove other points, but impossible to prove or disprove in and of itself. By the same token, it's impossible to prove that love exists—and yet if you believe in the premise of love (as almost all human beings do, Lewis hopes), then Christianity follows as the logical next step.

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God Character Timeline in The Screwtape Letters

The timeline below shows where the character God appears in The Screwtape Letters. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Letter I
Religion and Reason Theme Icon
...a few centuries. The writer mentions that Wormwood must keep the patient away from the “Enemy.” (full context)
Religion and Reason Theme Icon
Freedom, Will, and Sin Theme Icon
The writer recalls a “young atheist” he was trying to keep away from the Enemy. One day, the atheist was thinking “the wrong way.” Instead of trying to convince him... (full context)
Letter II
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Religion and Reason Theme Icon
Freedom, Will, and Sin Theme Icon
...a Christian. Screwtape encourages Wormwood not to despair, since many humans have flirted with the Enemy before returning to evil. (full context)
Love Theme Icon
Freedom, Will, and Sin Theme Icon
Fashion, Progress, and Change Theme Icon
...could be marriage, school, or, in the patient’s case, Christianity. This disappointment occurs because the Enemy creates humans to be free. Freedom is both an advantage and a disadvantage for the... (full context)
Letter IV
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Religion and Reason Theme Icon
...with prayer is to encourage the praying person to think of himself, rather than of God. Thus, when the patient prays for bravery from God, Wormwood should encourage the patient to... (full context)
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Religion and Reason Theme Icon
Wormwood can tamper with the patient’s prayer by encouraging him to think of God in concrete, visual terms. There are many people, Screwtape notes, who get in the habit... (full context)
Letter V
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Religion and Reason Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Freedom, Will, and Sin Theme Icon
...this suffering is useless to devils unless people go to Hell because of it. Moreover, God often rewards people for showing bravery in battle, even if they are fighting for a... (full context)
Letter VI
Love Theme Icon
...in a state of uncertainty and anxiety about whether or not he’ll have to fight. God wants people to think about what they’re doing, while devils want people to think about... (full context)
Letter VII
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Religion and Reason Theme Icon
...The paradox of evil is that when devils conceal their existence, humans don’t believe in God, but they also don’t act directly on behalf of evil. On the other hand, when... (full context)
Religion and Reason Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Fashion, Progress, and Change Theme Icon
If the patient is a physical coward and an uneasy believer in God, as Screwtape guesses he is, then Wormwood should try to make him a pacifist. As... (full context)
Letter VIII
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Religion and Reason Theme Icon
Freedom, Will, and Sin Theme Icon
...bound to happen at some point, and it doesn’t necessarily last. Indeed, Screwtape notes that God relies on these periods of dullness and dissatisfaction for converting people to Christianity. (full context)
Proving Christianity True by Exploring Evil Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Freedom, Will, and Sin Theme Icon
Screwtape acknowledges, grudgingly, that God really does love human beings, and wants to fill the universe with them. The goal... (full context)
Proving Christianity True by Exploring Evil Theme Icon
Freedom, Will, and Sin Theme Icon
In order to populate the universe with loyal followers, God uses periods of sadness and pain. Instead of simply proving his existence to humanity, as... (full context)
Freedom, Will, and Sin Theme Icon
...a human being lives through a period of great suffering, and continues to believe in God. Nevertheless, periods of suffering can be useful to devils—Screwtape promises to tell Wormwood how they... (full context)
Letter IX
Freedom, Will, and Sin Theme Icon
...humans are sad, lonely, or otherwise in pain—can be useful for swaying humans away from God and Christianity. (full context)
Love Theme Icon
Freedom, Will, and Sin Theme Icon
...a single form of pleasure. Every pleasure humans are capable of experiencing was created by God. Thus, devils sway human beings by encouraging them to enjoy God’s pleasure “at times, or... (full context)
Proving Christianity True by Exploring Evil Theme Icon
Fashion, Progress, and Change Theme Icon
Another way to sway depressed humans away from God is to make them think that their depressed phase is a mere reaction to the... (full context)
Letter X
Religion and Reason Theme Icon
Freedom, Will, and Sin Theme Icon
Fashion, Progress, and Change Theme Icon
...of Wormwood’s, that the patient has made new acquaintances who are tempting him away from God. There is a middle-aged married couple—rich, clever, seemingly intellectual, pacifist—with whom the patient seems to... (full context)
Letter XI
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Freedom, Will, and Sin Theme Icon
Fun is sometimes useful to devils, because it can distract them from God, but it also promotes courage, peace, and generosity, meaning that it’s usually bad for devils.... (full context)
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Fashion, Progress, and Change Theme Icon
...Thus, when people talk flippantly about Christianity, they are more likely to move away from God’s majesty. (full context)
Letter XII
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Love Theme Icon
Freedom, Will, and Sin Theme Icon
Fashion, Progress, and Change Theme Icon
...in corrupting the patient, but warns him that if he moves the patient away from God too quickly, the patient will become aware of what is happening and try to regain... (full context)
Proving Christianity True by Exploring Evil Theme Icon
Religion and Reason Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Freedom, Will, and Sin Theme Icon
...piety, but a weak sense of dissatisfaction will make the patient reluctant to think about God any further, or even to go to church. Over time, the patient will become unhappy... (full context)
Religion and Reason Theme Icon
Freedom, Will, and Sin Theme Icon
Screwtape notes that Christians think of God as a being “without whom Nothing is strong.” In a sense, Nothing is the devils’... (full context)
Letter XIII
Religion and Reason Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Freedom, Will, and Sin Theme Icon
Humans’ tastes and pleasures are the basic material with which God encourages them to become Christians, Screwtape says. When he tempts humans, Screwtape always begins by... (full context)
Letter XIV
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Religion and Reason Theme Icon
Freedom, Will, and Sin Theme Icon
...not, as many people think, the denial of one’s talent or character. Screwtape observes that God wants humans to believe that they could build “the best cathedral in the world,” know... (full context)
Love Theme Icon
Freedom, Will, and Sin Theme Icon
In a sense, Screwtape speculates, God wants humans to replace one kind of self-love with a different kind. Humans should love... (full context)
Letter XV
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Religion and Reason Theme Icon
Fashion, Progress, and Change Theme Icon
...time, the present, yet they are destined to go to Heaven and live in eternity. God wants humans to contemplate the present moment in which they live, as well as the... (full context)
Religion and Reason Theme Icon
Freedom, Will, and Sin Theme Icon
Fashion, Progress, and Change Theme Icon
...sin is “rooted in the future”—greed, fear, pride, ambition, etc. While it is true that God wants humans to think about the future, too, he wants them to think of the... (full context)
Letter XVI
Religion and Reason Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Fashion, Progress, and Change Theme Icon
God wants humans to approach churches with some skepticism about the information they learn there. At... (full context)
Letter XVIII
Religion and Reason Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
Freedom, Will, and Sin Theme Icon
...“My good is my good and your good is yours. What one gains another loses.” God’s philosophy is the exact opposite: to promote cooperate, generosity, and love. This is the reason... (full context)
Love Theme Icon
Freedom, Will, and Sin Theme Icon
Screwtape criticizes God for creating something as absurd as love. Even worse, God associates “innocent” sexual desire with... (full context)
Love Theme Icon
Screwtape explains how devils manipulate God’s love to tempt humans. Because God has associated love and sexuality, devils try to convince... (full context)
Letter XIX
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Love Theme Icon
...has insisted, all beings are by nature in competition with each other, then how can God be said to love humanity, as Screwtape has also insisted? Screwtape begs Wormwood not to... (full context)
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Love Theme Icon
Screwtape revises his opinion of God. God does not really love humans, he now insists. It would be impossible for God... (full context)
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Love Theme Icon
Freedom, Will, and Sin Theme Icon
Screwtape explains that it was the ambiguity in God’s reasons for creating mankind that first led “Our Father,” Satan, to rebel against God. God... (full context)
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Love Theme Icon
Freedom, Will, and Sin Theme Icon
...a suicide. Better yet, the patient could be induced to marry someone. While marriage is God’s invention, it can be useful for devils. There are certain brides who would corrupt the... (full context)
Letter XX
Love Theme Icon
Freedom, Will, and Sin Theme Icon
Fashion, Progress, and Change Theme Icon
Screwtape notes that God has ended Wormwood’s attacks on the patient’s chastity. While this was inevitable, Screwtape argues, Wormwood... (full context)
Letter XXI
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Religion and Reason Theme Icon
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Freedom, Will, and Sin Theme Icon
...moon. Indeed, the patient, at least according to his Christian beliefs, is the servant of God all day. Thus, every day that the patient has nothing irritating to do except listen... (full context)
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Religion and Reason Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
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...he owns the house he lives in. Indeed, humans cannot truly claim that they “own” anything—God has given them everything. (full context)
Letter XXII
Love Theme Icon
Freedom, Will, and Sin Theme Icon
Based on his description of the patient’s love interest, Screwtape criticizes God for being “a hedonist at heart.” Although God appears to surround himself with crosses and... (full context)
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Religion and Reason Theme Icon
Freedom, Will, and Sin Theme Icon
...humans are under the mistaken belief that devils have been punished for their revolt against God by being transformed into ugly creatures. In fact, he explains, devils simply take on the... (full context)
Letter XXIII
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Love Theme Icon
Fashion, Progress, and Change Theme Icon
...downhill since the era of its founding. This point of view claims that “the historical Jesus” was very different from the figure that Christians worship in the 20th century. “The historical... (full context)
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One common quality of every version of the historical Jesus is that he was a “Great man” in the modern sense of the word: in... (full context)
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The historical Jesus, Screwtape continues, is actually ahistorical insofar as the intellectual aspects of Jesus Christ are emphasized... (full context)
Letter XXVII
Religion and Reason Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
...little to tempt the patient. Wormwood has tried to distract the patient from thoughts of God by encouraging him to think only of love. But this has been counterproductive, because when... (full context)
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Religion and Reason Theme Icon
Love Theme Icon
...in love, however, the patient may indulge in “false spirituality”—he may make non-petitionary prayers to God. This is good for devils, since God commands Christians to pray for bread and health,... (full context)
Letter XXVIII
Freedom, Will, and Sin Theme Icon
...disaster—his soul is so pious at the moment that if he is killed now then God will have defeated the devils. Screwtape suggests that Wormwood has spent too much time around... (full context)
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...that he will enter middle age, which is an excellent time for temptation. So far, God has protected the patient from the temptations of youth, but those of middle age are... (full context)
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Fashion, Progress, and Change Theme Icon
Screwtape continues that old age is an even more dangerous time for humanity. Because God created men to live in Heaven, they find it difficult to live on Earth. Thus,... (full context)
Letter XXIX
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Religion and Reason Theme Icon
Freedom, Will, and Sin Theme Icon
...an irritating dilemma for devils: if they promote justice and peace, then they are serving God. If, however, they promote chaos and war, then in the ensuing violence, millions of people... (full context)
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Freedom, Will, and Sin Theme Icon
...humility, but he will also train himself to think that he has something other than God to “fall back on,” namely, superstition and elaborate plans and courses of action. Screwtape concludes... (full context)
Letter XXXI
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In the final seconds before he died, the patient saw God. Wormwood, Screwtape guesses, saw God too, and cowered before him. Perhaps Wormwood was amazed that... (full context)
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...only thing that sustains Screwtape is the knowledge that the devils’ realism will ultimately defeat God’s nonsensical love. Screwtape signs his final letter, “your increasingly and ravenously affectionate uncle, Screwtape.” (full context)