The Sound and the Fury

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Benjamin (Benjy) Compson Character Analysis

The first narrator of the book, a mute, mentally disabled man. Benjy was originally named “Maury” after his uncle, but Caroline changed his name when she discovered his disability. Benjy has no understanding of time, cause and effect, or morality, and experiences life as a muddled blur of sensations. Despite this, Benjy is able to sense things that the other Compsons can’t – he moans when Damuddy dies, and understands the moment that Caddy loses her virginity. The three things Benjy loves most are his sister Caddy, his pasture (which was sold to a golf club), and fire. He was castrated as a teen after trying to talk to a passing schoolgirl about Caddy who had just gotten married; his efforts were perceived as an attack.

Benjamin (Benjy) Compson Quotes in The Sound and the Fury

The The Sound and the Fury quotes below are all either spoken by Benjamin (Benjy) Compson or refer to Benjamin (Benjy) Compson. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Time, Memory, and the Past Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Vintage edition of The Sound and the Fury published in 1990.
April Seventh, 1928 Quotes

Caddy was all wet and muddy behind, and I started to cry and she came and squatted in the water.
“Hush now.” she said. “I’m not going to run away.” So I hushed. Caddy smelled like trees in the rain.

Related Characters: Benjamin (Benjy) Compson (speaker), Candace (Caddy) Compson
Page Number: 19
Explanation and Analysis:

When Benjy thinks "Caddy smelled like trees," we get one of the refrains of his narrative. Caddy, the second-born Compson child after Quentin, is the only one who can consistently comfort Benjy. Caddy loves Benjy deeply, and even in the midst of her argument with Quentin she realizes that someone needs to help Benjy cope with what he cannot understand of his surroundings. 

While playing outside, Caddy ends up "all wet and muddy behind." This imagery will also repeat itself throughout this first section, suggesting both Caddy's childhood sloppiness (she doesn't care much for the dress others want her to keep clean) and her transition into adolescence. Faulkner's male characters tend to be deeply afraid of menstruation and female sexuality in general, and as Caddy becomes sexually mature her family members increasingly associate her with dirtiness, earthiness, and lack of purity. 

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“All right.” Versh said. “You the one going to get whipped. I aint.” He went and pushed Caddy up into the tree to the first limb. We watched the muddy bottom of her drawers. Then we couldn’t see her. We could hear the tree thrashing…
“What you seeing.” Frony whispered.
I saw them. Then I saw Caddy, with flowers in her hair, and a long veil like shining wind. Caddy Caddy

Related Characters: Benjamin (Benjy) Compson (speaker), Frony Gibson (speaker), Versh Gibson (speaker), Candace (Caddy) Compson
Page Number: 39
Explanation and Analysis:

Here, already, the imagery of Caddy's "muddy bottom" finds its way into Benjy's narration. There is something voyeuristic about the others standing around watching from below while she climbs into the tree. There's little indication that Benjy feels anything but adoration for Caddy, but his oldest brother Quentin certainly has confused feelings about Caddy's emerging sexuality.

The kids are trying to spy on their grandmother Damuddy through an upstairs window, compelled by rumors that she is sick and dying. The Compton children, especially Caddy, are driven by their curiosity to find out what is happening in their chaotic home. Given the incompetence of their parents, the kids have to make their own sense of events like their grandmother's impending death.

At the end of this passage, Benjy sees Caddy again and is thrown back (or forward) into a memory of Caddy's wedding. Because both of these events happen in the past, but years apart, it can be extremely confusing to read Benjy's narrative. It is a multi-layered past, and Damuddy's death occurs well before Caddy’s wedding. But Benjy links things together through sensation and emotion, not through temporality or cause-and-effect. This allows Faulkner to link Damuddy’s funeral and Caddy’s wedding thematically: they are both, in part, signals that the Compsons’ prosperity is waning.

“It’s no joke.” Mother said. “My people are every bit as well born as yours. Just because Maury’s health is bad.”
“Of course.” Father said. “Bad health is the primary reason for all life. Created by disease, within putrefaction, into decay. Versh.”
“Sir.” Versh said behind my chair.
“Take the decanter and fill it.”

Related Characters: Benjamin (Benjy) Compson (speaker), Mr. Compson (speaker), Mrs. Compson (speaker), Versh Gibson (speaker), Maury Bascomb
Page Number: 44
Explanation and Analysis:

This passage provides a glimpse into how each of the Compson parents tends to function throughout the novel. Mrs. Compson is extremely anxious, and when she enters the novel she is almost always brooding over her family's troubles. Mr. Compson, on the other hand, is aloof. He makes huge philosophical pronouncements-- like "Bad health is the primary reason for all life"-- and drinks heavily. He demonstrates a certain level of caring for his children, but does little to engage with them in a deeper way. 

In this scene, Mrs. Compson scolds her husband through tears for a joke he has just made about her brother, Maury. She often worries that the Compson bloodline is cursed, wondering if she should have stayed in her "well born" family and avoided all the tragedy that seems to follow the Compsons around. 

Caddy and I ran. We ran up the kitchen steps, onto the porch, and Caddy knelt down in the dark and held me… “I wont.” she said. “I wont anymore, ever. Benjy. Benjy.” Then she was crying, and I cried, and we held each other. “Hush.” she said. “Hush. I wont anymore.” So I hushed and Caddy got up and we went into the kitchen and turned the light on and Caddy took the kitchen soap and washed her mouth at the sink, hard. Caddy smelled like trees.
I kept a telling you to stay away from there, Luster said. They sat up in the swing, quick. Quentin had her hands on her hair. He had a red tie.

Related Characters: Benjamin (Benjy) Compson (speaker), Candace (Caddy) Compson (speaker), Luster Gibson (speaker), Quentin Compson, The man in the red tie
Page Number: 48
Explanation and Analysis:

Once again, an occurrence in the novel's present (April 1928) sends Benjy spiraling into a memory. Benjy is trapped inside himself, still mourning his loss of Caddy all these years later but unable to vocalize any of his sadness or anxiety. In this memory, Benjy sees Caddy on the swing kissing a boyfriend, and he panics. After the boyfriend, Charlie, becomes angry at Benjy, Caddy chooses her brother over her boyfriend and runs away with Benjy to comfort him.

Because nearly everyone else is ineffective at comforting Benjy, Caddy is left to do too much of it. What might be seen as a “normal” developmental phenomenon— her first kiss on the swing outside their house— is interrupted by Benjy, who can only understand the kiss as another sign that Caddy is planning to run away. After comforting him, Caddy washes her mouth “hard” with soap. She has internalized much of the shame her family forces upon her, and wants to wash away her sin against the Compson honor.

Once she does this, Caddy once again smells like trees in Benjy’s mind; this tells us that Benjy has returned to a relative stability within himself. At the end of the passage, we return to the present, where Benjy has interrupted Miss Quentin (Caddy’s daughter) kissing someone (the man with the red tie) on the same swing.

“Candace.” Mother said. “I told you not to call him that. It was bad enough when your father insisted on calling you by that silly nickname, and I will not have him called by one. Nicknames are vulgar. Only common people use them. Benjamin.” she said.

Related Characters: Mrs. Compson (speaker), Benjamin (Benjy) Compson, Candace (Caddy) Compson
Page Number: 63-64
Explanation and Analysis:

Mrs. Compson is very sensitive to the names used for her children, and sees some connection between using full names and achieving the elevated status she seeks. This seems like a petty, desperate attempt to avoid all the “vulgar” realities of her family, and it is characteristic of Mrs. Compson that she worries about names while failing to take care of her children in any real way.

And, yet, this deep concern with names also makes sense within Faulkner’s novel. We learn that Benjy’s name was changed from Maury (like his uncle) to Benjamin when his parents discovered his disability. These characters feel pressing emotional connections with, and superstitions about, their names. In their eyes, calling the disabled child “Maury” would dishonor Mrs. Compson’s brother Maury. And calling Benjamin “Benjy” would, according to Mrs. Compson, lower their family to “common people” status.

At this point, it is also worthwhile to note how much doubling of names we see in this novel. The young Jason is named after his father Jason; Benjy is originally named Maury after his uncle; Caddy’s daughter Quentin is named after her dead brother Quentin. This makes the book more confusing to read, but also suggests important connections between different characters that are worth further consideration.

Caddy came to the door and stood there, looking at Father and Mother. Her eyes flew at me, and away. I began to cry. It went loud and I got up. Caddy came in and stood with her back to the wall, looking at me. I went toward her, crying, and she shrank against the wall and I saw her eyes and I cried louder and pulled at her dress. She put her hands out but I pulled at her dress. Her eyes ran.

Related Characters: Benjamin (Benjy) Compson (speaker), Candace (Caddy) Compson, Mr. Compson, Mrs. Compson
Page Number: 68-69
Explanation and Analysis:

Even though Benjy is in some ways less aware of the things happening around him, he seems to intuit the emotional states of other characters, especially Caddy, very well. She returns home after presumably having sex for the first time, and the sense of shame emanating from Caddy is tangible. Once again Benjy and Caddy run away together, but this time they stay inside the house. When they are kids, the Compsons are almost always outside; but now, slightly older, they stay more often within the walls of their home.

It’s not exactly clear in this passage whether Caddy is comforting Benjy or vice versa. Benjy’s crying grows louder when he sees Caddy’s eyes, meaning he understands her shame and sadness on an emotional level, if not cognitively. Benjy understands everything, even his own crying, as something happening outside of himself. Here, for example, he understands his crying in this way: “It went loud and I got up.” Benjy knows he is crying, but does not seem to connect his crying to whatever noise is growing louder around him.

In passages like this one, Faulkner uses Benjy’s perceptual uniqueness to introduce events, like Caddy’s first sexual experience, that will end up central to the rest of the novel. By giving us our first glimpse of these events through Benjy’s eyes, Faulkner avoids traditional cause-and-effect narration and makes things like sexuality and sibling interaction strange and mysterious once again.

June Second, 1910 Quotes

Got to marry somebody
Have there been very many Caddy
I don’t know too many will you look after Benjy and Father
You don’t know whose it is then does he know
Don’t touch me will you look after Benjy and Father

Related Characters: Quentin Compson (speaker), Candace (Caddy) Compson (speaker), Benjamin (Benjy) Compson, Mr. Compson
Page Number: 115
Explanation and Analysis:

Some of the more emotionally powerful passages in Quentin’s section are those in which Faulkner leaves traditional sentence structure behind and allows words and phrases to flood the page. This is one of them. Quentin is hit so quickly and fiercely with memories of a conversation with Caddy about her lost virginity that the narrative has no time for grammar or punctuation.

Caddy has seemingly decided to marry Herbert, one of her suitors, and knows her departure could be somewhat final— this is why she asks “will you look after Benjy and Father.” But Quentin is more worried about who Caddy has had sex with. First he asks “Have there been very many,” and we know Quentin is tortured by his belief that he should have stopped his younger sister from having sex with anyone at all. Then he says “You don’t know whose it is then does he know,” hinting at an unborn child belonging to someone besides Herbert. When Caddy says “Don’t touch me,” we start to imagine a very heated conversation, with Quentin grabbing Caddy and Caddy trying to pull away.

April Sixth, 1928 Quotes

How the hell can I do anything right, with that dam family and her not making any effort to control her nor any of them like that time when she happened to see one of them kissing Caddy and all next day she went around the house in a black dress and a veil and even Father couldn’t get her to say a word except crying and saying her little daughter was dead and Caddy about fifteen then… I haven’t got much pride, I cant afford it with a kitchen full of niggers to feed and robbing the state asylum of its star freshman. Blood, I says, governors and generals.

Related Characters: Jason Compson IV (speaker), Benjamin (Benjy) Compson, Candace (Caddy) Compson, Mr. Compson, Mrs. Compson
Page Number: 229-230
Explanation and Analysis:

In a conversation with his coworker Earl, Jason seems to realize the absurdity of his mother’s role in their increasingly small family. First he realizes that Mrs. Compson is “not making any effort to control her nor any of them.” Then Jason remembers a time when his mother saw Caddy kissing someone and “all next day went around the house in a black dress and veil.” This is one of the only passages where Jason critiques his mother and acknowledges that his father might be a helpful presence. The memory also shows the unhealthy level of shame and pressure placed on Caddy at a young age, and is another illustration of Mrs. Compson's neurotic, melodramatic nature.

Throughout this novel, Faulkner experiments with how little he can give his readers while still giving them the chance to understand what is going on. Here Jason uses only the pronouns “she” and “her” but we can figure out that he is speaking about his mother.

At the end of this passage, we find a brutal assessment of his brother Benjy— “robbing the state asylum of its star freshman”— and then get a seemingly random statement, “governors and generals.” Jason refers to the collective history of the South and its defeat in the Civil War, a concept central to Faulkner’s fiction. In doing so he tries to link his family’s troubled history to that of the South as a whole — emphasizing the idea of how far the Compson "blood" has fallen.

April Eighth, 1928 Quotes

“I wish you wouldn’t keep on bringin him to church, mammy,” Frony said. “Folks talkin.”
“Whut folks?” Dilsey said.
“I hears em,” Frony said.
“And I knows whut kind of folks,” Dilsey said. “Trash white folks. Dat’s who it is. Thinks he aint good enough fer white church, but nigger church aint good enough fer him.”
“Dey talks, jes de same,” Frony said.
“Den you send um to me,” Dilsey said. “Tell um de good Lawd don’t keer whether he bright er not. Don’t nobody but white trash keer dat.”

Related Characters: Dilsey Gibson (speaker), Frony Gibson (speaker), Benjamin (Benjy) Compson
Page Number: 290
Explanation and Analysis:

Unlike her mother Dilsey, Frony is concerned with other people around town and what they might think of the Compsons and their servant family. When Frony says “bringing him to church” she refers to Benjy, whom Dilsey insists on bringing with them. Dilsey remarks on Benjy’s in-between status in the eyes of the white townspeople: not good enough for white church, but too good for black church.

Dilsey dismisses the gossipers as “trash white folks,” and her willingness to defend Benjy at any cost makes her his Christ figure as they head to Easter service. Benjy cannot offer Dilsey anything besides love, but still she does anything she can to keep people from forgetting him, the man-child Jason wants to have sent off to the asylum.

In the midst of the voices and the hands Ben sat, rapt in his sweet blue gaze. Dilsey sat bolt upright beside, crying rigidly and quietly in the annealment and the blood of the remembered Lamb.
As they walked through the bright noon, up the sandy road with the dispersing congregation talking easily again group to group, she continued to weep, unmindful of the talk…
“Whyn’t you quit dat, mammy?” Frony said. “Wid dese people looking. We be passin white folks soon.”
“I’ve seed de first en de last,” Dilsey said. “Never you mind me.”
“First en last whut?” Frony said.
“Never you mind,” Dilsey said. “I seed de beginnin, en now I sees de endin.”

Related Characters: Dilsey Gibson (speaker), Frony Gibson (speaker), Benjamin (Benjy) Compson
Related Symbols: Easter
Page Number: 297
Explanation and Analysis:

In a rare reversal, Benjy is alert and watching while Dilsey cries. The Easter service has moved Dilsey deeply, and when Frony pushes Dilsey after church to explain why she is crying Dilsey explains, “I’ve seed de first en de last.” Using the same language he always uses for these black characters, Faulkner reveals deeper truths about Dilsey’s connection to the Compson family and to their overall history.

Even though she has always been a servant to the family, she has a real connection to them. Dilsey is perhaps the one character who sees “de first”— the period of relative happiness when the Compson kids were all children— and “de last”— the Compson family as it stands now after all its tragedies — and can be a relatively objective observer, accepting the sweep of time in a way Quentin or Jason cannot. In the Christian tradition, Easter encompasses an ending and a beginning; first Christ dies, then he goes to heaven to begin his eternal reign. The Easter service inspires Dilsey to consider the Compson’s family history as a whole, and she realizes that there may be no Christ-like rebirth for the Compsons. At the same time, Dilsey herself has been a sort of Christ figure throughout the novel, bearing all of her duties with humility and respect, rarely faltering — and now, ironically, she is the only real hope for a "resurrection" of the Compsons, and figures like Dilsey are the only real hope for a resurrection of the South itself.

Ben’s voice roared and roared. Queenie moved again, her feet began to clop-clop steadily again, and at once Ben hushed. Luster looked quickly back over his shoulder, then he drove on. The broken flower drooped over Ben’s fist and his eyes were empty and blue and serene again as cornice and façade flowed smoothly once more from left to right, post and tree, window and doorway and signboard each in its ordered place.

Related Characters: Benjamin (Benjy) Compson, Luster Gibson
Page Number: 320-321
Explanation and Analysis:

In this final passage of the book, Luster drives the Compsons' coach with Benjy aboard and the horse Queenie leading the way. Luster, not the usual driver of the coach, deviates from the usual course, and Benjy immediately grows very upset. Jason then rushes up and strikes both Luster and Benjy, ordering them home. This scene is hectic, with Faulkner's brusque sentences introducing a number of different characters each doing different things, in rapid succession.

In the final few sentences, as Luster corrects his course, Benjy immediately stops crying and seems to derive some comfort from his surroundings. Everything is "in its ordered place," and even if things are falling apart they are familiar. 

This seems like a strange ending to the book, as Faulkner's narration zooms out to give a wider view of all the characters at once. In fact, the entire fourth section of the book (most often thought of as Dilsey's section) has this zooming-out effect after the intense internality of the first three sections. As their wagon whips around the Confederate statue, Faulkner situates the Compson family once again in their town, their country, and their collective history. Things go on, the novel seems to say, even if they go on to fall apart. 

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Benjamin (Benjy) Compson Character Timeline in The Sound and the Fury

The timeline below shows where the character Benjamin (Benjy) Compson appears in The Sound and the Fury. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
April Seventh, 1928
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The narrative opens vaguely and confusingly. The narrator is Benjy, a mentally disabled man whose thirty-third birthday is occurring today, the day before Easter. He... (full context)
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Luster takes Benjy around the Compson property looking for a quarter Luster has lost. The property is next... (full context)
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Luster and Benjy sneak under a broken part of the fence into the golf course, and Benjy catches... (full context)
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In the memory Uncle Maury asks Versh, one of Dilsey’s sons and Benjy’s keeper at the time, to take Benjy outside. Mrs. Compson worries that Benjy will get... (full context)
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The story returns to the present, but the memory of Caddy makes Benjy moan again, annoying Luster. He gives Benjy a flower to calm him down, and then... (full context)
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Back in the present Benjy and Luster walk past the Compsons carriage house, which triggers another memory, this one from... (full context)
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...she will be dead soon and then not be such a burden anymore, and then Benjy returns to the present, where Luster is chiding him once again. (full context)
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Luster takes Benjy through the Compsons’ barn, and Benjy slips into another memory, twenty-six years earlier. He and... (full context)
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Back in the present, Luster leads Benjy down to the “branch,” the stream that runs through the Compson property. Luster sees some... (full context)
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Benjy slips back into another memory, this one of the day his grandmother “Damuddy” was buried.... (full context)
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Back in the present, Luster mentions that Benjy thinks that the pasture is still owned by the Compsons, though they had sold it... (full context)
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In this memory, Benjy and T.P. have gotten drunk off some champagne they found in the basement. T.P. thinks... (full context)
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Benjy then shifts back to the memory of the day of Damuddy’s death, as Versh carried... (full context)
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...that they listen to her as well. Dilsey serves dinner to the children, but then Benjy starts crying again. Quentin asks if Mrs. Compson was crying earlier, but Dilsey deflects the... (full context)
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The smell of Versh’s house brings Benjy into several memories. In 1910, Dilsey sings in the kitchen while Roskus, her husband, says... (full context)
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Benjy takes a toy from Miss Quentin, who is still very young, and Miss Quentin gets... (full context)
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Benjy briefly returns to the present, where Luster has found a golf ball, but he won’t... (full context)
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Benjy then remembers the death of the Compsons’ horse, Nancy, and he thinks about her bones... (full context)
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Benjy’s memory of Damuddy’s funeral day becomes briefly interspersed with his drunken memory of Caddy’s wedding... (full context)
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Back on Caddy’s wedding day, Benjy remembers her wedding veil, and T.P. trying to keep him quiet as he drunkenly moans.... (full context)
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...for her “prissy dress,” and says she is trying to be better than everyone else. Benjy is clearly upset by something about Caddy’s attire, so she tries taking off her hat.... (full context)
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...Mr. Compson then fills his decanter of alcohol and leaves. Caddy falls asleep next to Benjy, trying to comfort him. (full context)
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Benjy returns to the memory of Damuddy’s funeral, when Caddy is up in the tree. Dilsey... (full context)
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Back in the present, Luster warns Benjy not to go by the nearby swing, as Miss Quentin is there with her “beau.”... (full context)
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Caddy finally runs away from Charlie with Benjy and they go up to the house. Caddy knows Benjy is upset with her for... (full context)
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Back in 1928, Benjy approaches the swing and interrupts Miss Quentin and her boyfriend, who is wearing a red... (full context)
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...to meet them. The man with the red tie is furious and sends Luster and Benjy away. (full context)
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Benjy and Luster then walk further down the fence, still looking for golf balls, and when... (full context)
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Later in the same memory, Benjy slips out the gate and runs after the girls, scaring them. He tries to talk... (full context)
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...him and refuses to give him a quarter. Then he calls for his caddie, making Benjy moan again. Luster gives Benjy another flower to try and cheer him up. Luster says... (full context)
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Luster then takes Benjy back to the house, where Dilsey scolds Luster, thinking he has purposefully made Benjy upset,... (full context)
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Back in the present, Dilsey gives Benjy his birthday cake and lights all thirty-three candles. She is still scolding Luster, and Luster... (full context)
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In the present again Benjy reaches his hand into the fire, burns himself, and starts wailing. Dilsey wraps up his... (full context)
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The library reminds Benjy of another occasion with Caddy, when they were in the library and Benjy was only... (full context)
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...off to bed. Then Caddy and Jason start to fight because Jason has cut up Benjy’s paper dolls. Jason cries and says it was an accident, though it was clearly malicious,... (full context)
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In the present, Benjy keeps making noise in the library, and the adult Jason comes in, angry with Benjy... (full context)
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...tie. Miss Quentin is clearly not ashamed of her actions, and she argues with Jason. Benjy briefly returns to a memory of Quentin telling his father about a fight he got... (full context)
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Benjy then remembers an evening around 1909, when Caddy comes home from a date where she... (full context)
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...sits down to dinner, and Miss Quentin complains that she doesn’t like living here, as Benjy is like “a pig” and Jason is cruel to her. Jason gets angry and Miss... (full context)
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In between the arguing, Benjy remembers Versh saying that Mrs. Compson changed Benjy’s name because she was too proud, and... (full context)
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Benjy again remembers Caddy smelling like trees, and then back in the present Luster is pleased... (full context)
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Benjy then returns to the night Damuddy died and Caddy got her underwear dirty. Jason tattles... (full context)
June Second, 1910
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This next chapter is narrated by Quentin, Benjy’s brother. Quentin wakes up in his dorm room at Harvard, sees a shadow on the... (full context)
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...a shadow move across the door and thinks about the night of Caddy’s wedding, when Benjy and T.P. were drunk. Quentin goes outside and sees Shreve, who asks him why he... (full context)
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...dialogue keeps returning to the night Caddy lost her virginity, when she came home and Benjy started wailing. Quentin then thinks about the Compsons changing Benjy’s name from Maury. (full context)
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...the water all the time.” He thinks of the weight of two flat-irons, and of Benjy smelling Damuddy’s death. (full context)
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...letters about him, and his invitation to Caddy’s wedding. He remembers how his parents sold Benjy’s pasture to pay for Quentin’s Harvard tuition. Quentin then vaguely muses about his mother’s shallowness... (full context)
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...of her children had turned against her. He thinks of her long complaints about how Benjy’s ailment was a punishment against her, and how only Jason was more Bascomb (her family)... (full context)
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...off the money for his Harvard tuition, but Caddy said she couldn’t – they sold Benjy’s pasture to pay for Quentin’s tuition, so he had to finish his schooling or it... (full context)
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...discovering she had sex with Dalton Ames, and the smell of honeysuckle on her, and Benjy wailing when she came home. (full context)
April Sixth, 1928
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...by Jason Compson, and it begins on the morning of Good Friday, the day before Benjy’s section takes place. Jason is arguing with his mother about Miss Quentin, Jason’s niece. Mrs.... (full context)
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...Mrs. Compson. Jason goes around the house to get his car and encounters Luster and Benjy. He sends them away angrily, ranting to himself about his lazy servants and idiot brother. (full context)
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...inner tirade about how much he has had to work all his life, and how Benjy, Miss Quentin, his mother, and the Gibsons (Dilsey and her family) are nothing but burdens... (full context)
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...convinced Dilsey, but Jason threatened Dilsey if she ever let Caddy see Miss Quentin or Benjy. Dilsey called Jason a “cold man” and thanked God she had more heart than he. (full context)
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...suffers for her children, and Jason mostly ignores her. He then listens to Luster feeding Benjy and rants to himself about all the lazy mouths he has to feed. Jason wants... (full context)
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...probably studying in her room, but Jason suspects she is up to something. Jason hears Benjy snoring, and he thinks about how Benjy was castrated after he attacked the schoolgirls. Jason... (full context)
April Eighth, 1928
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It is Easter Sunday, two days after Jason’s section and one day after Benjy’s. The narrator is now a third-person voice, which begins by following Dilsey. At dawn Dilsey... (full context)
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...has been trying to play the musical saw, and Dilsey orders him to wake up Benjy and get him dressed. Luster keeps delaying in his work – trying to go back... (full context)
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Dilsey serves Benjy his breakfast and treats him with tenderness and sympathy. Jason comes downstairs, angry and sarcastic... (full context)
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Meanwhile Benjy is wailing again, and Dilsey and Luster try to calm him down. Dilsey asks Luster... (full context)
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Luster, Benjy, Dilsey, and Frony walk together to the local black church for an Easter service. Many... (full context)
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...that she has “seen the beginning, and now she sees the ending.” The Gibsons and Benjy return to the Compson house to find Jason still gone. Mrs. Compson is in bed,... (full context)
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Back in Jefferson, Dilsey sends Luster and Benjy outside so they can’t cause any trouble. Benjy starts watching the nearby golfers and moaning... (full context)
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T.P. would usually drive Benjy to the cemetery to comfort him, but T.P. isn’t around today so Luster offers to... (full context)
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At a monument to a Confederate soldier Luster deviates from T.P.’s usual course, and Benjy immediately starts howling at the strange route. At that moment Jason returns, and he runs... (full context)
Appendix: Compson: 1699-1945
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...explains what happened after the novel ends – after Mrs. Compson died, Jason IV sent Benjy to the State Asylum in Jackson and then sold the Compson house to someone who... (full context)
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...waited until the academic year was over to commit suicide because the family had sold Benjy’s pasture to pay for his tuition. (full context)
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...and feared only Dilsey among all other things. It was Jason who secretly made himself Benjy’s guardian and had him castrated after Benjy attacked the schoolgirl. After Mrs. Compson died in... (full context)
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Next is Benjamin, who was born as Maury, named after Uncle Maury who borrowed money from everyone –... (full context)
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...and Luster, who at only 14 was able to fully care for the mentally disabled Benjy. There is only one line about Dilsey: “They endured.” (full context)