The Wanderer

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Cody Character Analysis

Cody’s log entries make up one half of The Wanderer’s narration, with Sophie’s diary being the other. Cody’s journey across the ocean is less defined than Sophie’s—whereas Sophie know she wants to see Bompie, Cody just seems to be along for the ride. The way he acts aboard the ship fits this description, too, since he never seems to take anything too seriously, always calling different parts of the boat by the wrong name (sometimes deliberately, it seems, to frustrate Brian) and goofing off in general. This gets him in trouble with his father, Mo, quite often. Cody’s relationship with Mo transforms, however, aboard The Wanderer. While Mo begins the book constantly yelling and bickering at Cody, after the crew encounters a nearly fatal wave on the ocean, Mo begins to ease up on his son. Cody is also changed by the wave; shocked by the kindness his father begins to show him, Cody starts to see his father in a new light, as someone he doesn’t really know all that well, and as a fellow human being with his own unique history, not merely a brooding, cold authority figure. Cody’s own sense of identity—his sense of self-worth and independence—changes when his relationship to his father evolves.

Cody Quotes in The Wanderer

The The Wanderer quotes below are all either spoken by Cody or refer to Cody. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
The Passage of Time  Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the HarperCollins edition of The Wanderer published in 2011.
II. Shakedown Quotes

Sophie talks about my aunt and uncle as if they are her real parents, even though they are only her adopted parents and she’s only been with them three years. Brian says Sophie lives in a dream world, but I think it’s kind of neat that she does that. At least she isn’t sitting around moping about being an orphan.

Related Characters: Cody (speaker), Sophie, Brian
Page Number: 23-24
Explanation and Analysis:

Written in his first journal entry, Cody here tells us something important that Sophie has left out of her journal entries so far—the parents she’s been telling us about are actually her adoptive parents. As we find out later in the book, Sophie has largely blocked out all of her memories of her biological parents from her conscious mind, as if something deep inside of her psyche wants to erase her past and start life over from scratch. While Brian thinks that the world Sophie has invented for herself is too dreamlike and irrational, Cody seems to be constantly fascinated by it.

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V. Wind and Waves Quotes

Last night I dreamed about Sophie, and this morning I asked Uncle Dock if Sophie knew what had happened to her parents. He said, “At some level, Sophie must know. But consciously? That’s something only Sophie can answer.”

Related Characters: Cody (speaker), Sophie, Dock
Page Number: 178-179
Explanation and Analysis:

Cody writes this while The Wanderer is sailing from Gran Manan towards England, before the ship encounters the nearly-fatal storm.

Dock’s response makes a crucial point about Sophie’s psyche. At some level, deep down in her mind, she must still have memories of her parents and their deaths. But at the conscious level—at the level of her everyday awareness—Sophie doesn’t seem to remember. Sophie’s mind is therefore split in two. At the level of her conscious thoughts, she lives in something of a dream world, imagining her adoptive parents to be her real ones, having no apparent recollection of her past life before them.

However, at a deeper level that Sophie isn’t aware of consciously, there must still be in her mind a knowledge of her past. This fact, that Sophie still remembers her true past in some form, is evidenced by the “little kid” she sometimes mentions. Often bringing up a story about the little kid whenever she’s asked about her (Sophie’s) past life, it seems that Sophie has projected the past she doesn’t want to remember—that is, her own—onto the fictional “little kid.”

There's a little kid. And the little kid doesn't know what is going on. The little kid is just cold or hungry or scared and wants Mommy and Daddy. And when other people tell the little kid that Mommy and Daddy have gone to heaven . . . the little kid feels bad and wonders why they didn't take their little kid with them . . .
And everywhere the little kid goes, people ask what the little kid remembers about the grown-ups, who have gone away to the beautiful place, but the little kid doesn’t want to remember that painful thing. . . . The little kid wants to be right here, right now . . . not back at those times the little kid got left behind.
But no matter what the little kid might want, something inside pushes the little kid ahead while something or someone pulls the little kid back.

Related Characters: Sophie (speaker), Cody
Related Symbols: The Little Kid
Page Number: 204
Explanation and Analysis:

Cody writes this in the aftermath of the nearly-fatal storm, as The Wanderer regains control of its course towards England. He’s recording the response Sophie gave when he asked her if she “remembered things from when she was little.”

Unsurprisingly (by this point in the book), Sophie, being asked about her past by Cody, starts talking about the little kid instead. The little kid, a fictional character onto which Sophie projects the truth of her own past in order to disconnect herself from it, wants so very much to be able to live in the present. Having gone through a very painful past of losing their parents, and then being, as we learn later on, chucked from place to place—from their grandpa’s (who died), to their aunt’s (who didn’t want the little kid), and then from foster home to foster home—the little kid has felt rejected and unwanted. The little kid even felt rejected by their own parents, wondering why they wouldn’t take their child to heaven with them. In order to get on with life and live happily, the little kid just wants to be able to look ahead, and not backwards at the pain of the past.

The “push-pull” dynamic at the core of Sophie’s psyche shines through here. Sophie (the little kid) feels pushed by her painful past into a better future, where she can live a happy, fulfilling life where she feels valued. Yet, at the same time, she feels pulled back by her painful past, for she can’t totally erase it, even though she tries.

In trying to get totally beyond her past by wholly forgetting it, Sophie, or the little kid, gets caught-up in this back-and-forth of being pushed and pulled. Perhaps if Sophie would try to reconcile herself with the past by remembering it and coming to terms with it—by recognizing the good parts about it—she could achieve a steadier state of mind. Cody, at the end of the book, tries to help her recognize this.

Last night, Cody and I got into this very serious talk about Life. We wondered if maybe people never die, but simply live on and on, leaving other planes behind. When you come near death, you die on one plane—so to everyone you are with, you are dead, but you—the you in you—doesn’t stop existing. Instead, you keep living the same as always and it just seems as if you’ve had a close call. We wondered if maybe we’re not each just one person, but many people existing on millions of different planes, like a line that branches off and branches again and on it goes, but it always has one central trunk.

Related Characters: Sophie (speaker), Cody
Related Symbols: The Open Ocean
Page Number: 210
Explanation and Analysis:

Having endured the violent wave and passed through the storm, Sophie writes about a conversation she had with Cody regarding, rather appropriately, life and death.

Since they both were the most injured by the wave—the most brutally swept up in its overwhelming force—Sophie and Cody have probably come the closest to death among the crew. Having had near-death encounters, their minds must subsequently be fixated on the fact that they saw their lives vanish before them, only to be saved because they both had their safety harnesses on at the time.

Their question about death—about whether one ever really experiences death, or rather just keeps being reborn on different “planes”—is therefore fitting. Did they actually die when the wave struck? Have they been reborn? While they do not give the question an ultimate answer, the fact that they’re raising it shows that the ocean has deeply changed them. They’re asking questions about the fundamental nature of life, of existence—they’re thinking about life in a way they never have before. Had they stayed on land and never ventured out onto the open ocean, it’s not likely they would be wondering if, in a single human lifetime, there are actually millions of different life-branches.

What I wonder is this: how come you don’t notice the time going by, and you don’t think you are changing in any way, but then all of a sudden you realize that what you are thinking today is different from what you thought yesterday and that you are different from what you were yesterday—or last week—or last month?

Related Characters: Cody (speaker)
Page Number: 211
Explanation and Analysis:

In another interesting philosophical moment in the book, Cody raises this question as he’s recovering from his encounter with the almost deadly Wave. The violent storm has changed Cody, as well as his dad (Mo). Having faced death, Cody’s way of perceiving the world is different—and this includes his perception of his father. He now sees his father in a totally different light, as if he’s a stranger with a history that Cody is totally ignorant of. Mo has also changed—he realizes how poor of a father he’s been to Cody.

It’s therefore fitting that Cody raises this question about the nature of change. Why don’t we notice that we’re changing as we’re doing it? Why do we only have knowledge of our changes after they’ve run their course on us—after the fact that we’ve changed? Though Cody never gives an answer, it’s remarkable that he’s even asking the question. Cody, as we knew him in the beginning of the novel, is not someone who lives a “life of the mind”—he doesn’t typically ask questions like this. But now, his life having been altered by an encounter with death, Cody is thinking more about his life as a whole. The wave has changed his outlook on life.

Everyone is talking about reaching Ireland, but I feel weird, as if we’re not really going to get there, or as if I’m not ready to be there. And what will happen with Sophie when we do reach Bompie? Maybe that’s part of the reason I don’t want to get there. I’m afraid for Sophie.

Related Characters: Cody (speaker), Sophie, Bompie
Page Number: 212
Explanation and Analysis:

Cody writes this shortly after his previous quote. The crew is mostly recovered from the storm, and soon Cody and Sophie will spot land—the coast of Ireland.

Cody’s initial fascination with Sophie’s weirdness and mystique has now turned into a genuine concern for her mental health and well-being. He seems to know that there’s something peculiar about Sophie’s relationship with Bompie—but not in the way that Brian thinks their relationship is strange.

While Brian is downright infuriated by Sophie’s insistence that she knows Bompie, believing her to be making up everything she says, Cody doesn’t seem to doubt Sophie, at least entirely. Though he’s unsure about how she knows Bompie’s stories, he seems more concerned about how she will react to meeting Bompie—how her emotions will hold up—and not so much about whether she’s lying or not.

Cody seems to understand that Sophie has identified with Bompie in a powerful way, and, knowing Sophie’s capacity to dream her world, perhaps he’s worried that Sophie has thought Bompie is someone he’s not, that he means something to her imagination which he cannot uphold in the flesh. Cody is perhaps worried that Sophie will meet Bompie, have her illusions about him shattered, and be deeply saddened.

VI. Land Quotes

I reached across the bed and touched her hand. “Sophie,” I said. “Maybe that’s not Bompie’s story. Maybe that’s your story.”
Bompie whispered, “Sophie, he’s right. That’s your story, honey.”
Sophie stared at me and then at Bompie. She looked so scared and so little sitting there beside Bompie. And then she put her head down on Bompie’s chest and she cried and cried and cried.

Related Characters: Cody (speaker), Sophie, Bompie
Related Symbols: The Wave, The Little Kid
Page Number: 249
Explanation and Analysis:

This passage, written by Cody when he and the crew have arrived at Bompie’s cottage, is arguably the climax of the entire book. Before this moment, Sophie has spent a good deal of time retelling Bompie’s stories to him. With each story, however, when Bompie becomes submerged in a body of water—whether it’s the new car story, the railway bridge story, the swimming story, or the ocean story—Sophie makes sure to emphasize the fact that Bompie really struggled and had a rough time in the water.

Yet each time Sophie gets to this part, Bompie says he doesn’t recognize it—he doesn’t remember ever struggling in the water that way. Finally, Sophie tells a story about when Bompie was out at sea with his parents and a giant wave came upon them. She then stutters, trying but unable to say that the wave drowned Bompie’s parents, and Cody finishes her sentence for her. Sophie then gasps in agreement with Cody, but Cody and Bompie say that Sophie is mixing her own story up with Bompie’s.

Sophie, therefore, is gently encouraged to accept the truth of her past, the truth of her own story. Until now, she’s blocked it out and transferred it onto other people, like the “little kid” and Bompie. Now, however, Sophie has to realize that all the time she’s spent idealizing Bompie has been largely due to the fact the she thought, on some mental level, that he shared her history and her traumatic past—even though she’d blocked it out.

Sophie is finally left alone with her own truth; she can no longer project it onto anyone else.

It was strange reading the ones about the car in the river, and leaping off the train tracks, and Bompie’s baptism, and Bompie in the swimming hole, and Bompie at the ocean. Most of what Sophie had told us was pretty much the way he had told it to her in his letters, except for the parts about struggling in the water. He was in the water all those times, but he hadn’t written about struggling in it.
Those parts had come from Sophie.

Related Characters: Cody (speaker), Sophie, Bompie
Page Number: 250
Explanation and Analysis:

Cody writes this shortly after the last quote, after Sophie has given him a notebook with the letters Bompie had written to her over a period of three years. Cody writes that Bompie’s first letter welcomed Sophie to her new, adoptive family, while each one after told her a story about his life.

This quote is important because it shows an evolution in Cody’s understanding of Sophie. He’s now not only certain that Sophie hasn’t (entirely) made up Bompie’s stories, but he’s also coming to see firsthand how Sophie’s traumatic past and fear of the water has influenced all her versions of Bompie’s stories—how her memories and fear of water, to a great extent, propelled her interest in Bompie’s stories.

Cody can now see that Sophie recited each story very closely to the way Bompie had written them, but also that Sophie added a part which she must have not realized she was actively adding. The parts about Bompie struggling in the water were what Sophie wanted to read in Bompie’s stories—she wanted to learn about and know someone who understood her own struggles with water.

Cody’s book-long fascination with Sophie, then, develops here into a more nuanced understanding of how her inner world works.

Cody ripped off the wrapping. Inside was a pen-and-ink drawing of Cody juggling. He was standing on The Wanderer, and the boat was leaning way over, but Cody was perfectly balanced, and he was juggling not pretzels—or socks—but people. Each of us was a little wee tiny person up in the air, and Cody was juggling us.

Related Characters: Sophie (speaker), Cody
Page Number: 259
Explanation and Analysis:

Sophie writes this passage at Bompie’s. She’s writing about an evening when Uncle Mo distributed gifts of drawings and paintings he made on The Wanderer to Bompie and the crew.

This passage is significant because Mo’s drawing points out how Cody—though he was often framed in the book as a silly, unserious goof-off—has, in a way, been the most observant person on The Wanderer. While Sophie has a keen mind for observing people and things and investigating them, she’s often caught up in her push-pull world of struggling to know what’s true and what’s not. Cody, however, has carefully observed Sophie for a long time, and has come to an advanced understanding of why she thinks and acts the way she does.

While trying to unravel Sophie’s mysteries, Cody has also had to juggle the aggressiveness and anger of his father, as well as the bossy, accusatory, and overbearing natures of Brian and Uncle Stew.

And, while Cody and Sophie are both outcasts of the crew in a way, Cody has probably felt less connected to Sophie, than she has with him, since Sophie always seems caught up in her own dream world, in a place where she can’t always be reached. Cody, then, has been uniquely alone on the whole trip, juggling his relationships with all the other crewmembers on his own, with little support.

Further, this passage marks an important moment for Sophie, as Mo’s gift to her is a symbol of her acceptance into the family. While she wasn’t expecting to receive a gift, she did, much to her happiness, get one—just like everyone else. Sophie’s finally landed somewhere stable, in a family of which she can be a permanent member.

I’ve been thinking about the little kid. I think that one day the little kid got lucky and she landed in a place where it was okay if she couldn’t remember all the time, and because it was okay if she couldn’t remember all the time, and because it was okay not to remember, she started to remember. And along with the painful things came the good things to remember and maybe she felt as if she’d found some things she’d lost.

Related Characters: Cody (speaker), Sophie
Related Symbols: The Little Kid
Page Number: 263
Explanation and Analysis:

Written in his last journal entry of the book, Cody records here his final thoughts about the little kid—about Sophie’s younger self, whom Sophie has tried to forget. Perhaps, Cody wonders, Sophie (the little kid) needed to reach a place where it was all right for her to forget her past—where it was okay for her to live totally in the present, however she conceived of it. This achievement was probably a good thing for Sophie, since it allowed her to acquire a sense of belonging with her adoptive family. No longer remembering her old parents or her constant skipping from foster home to foster home, Sophie could finally feel accepted, valued, and wanted.

But now that Sophie’s reached this point, Cody suggests that it’s become okay for her to start remembering the past, which explains why Sophie has, over the course of the trip, been slowly starting to remember what she’s blocked out. Precisely because Sophie reached a place where she could stop remembering her past and finally feel a sense of being present in a new life that welcomed her is why she now seems more prone to remembering her past. Maybe, at some level of her mind, she thinks it’s finally safe to start remembering.

Cody seems to imply that he thinks this new stage in Sophie’s life will be incredibly healthy for Sophie—that it will allow her to live not in a false present, but in a real one no longer held back by the blocked-out pain of her past.

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Cody Character Timeline in The Wanderer

The timeline below shows where the character Cody appears in The Wanderer. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
I. Preparations
Men and Women Theme Icon
...to join them, arguing that she knows more about boats than her two cousins—Brian and Cody—combined. (full context)
Men and Women Theme Icon
Family and Personal Identity Theme Icon
...and always lying around tanning instead of helping with the boat, yet nonetheless barking orders. Cody, his son, is “fit and muscular,” and always attracting the attention of girls who pass... (full context)
II. Shakedown
Dreaming vs. The Real World Theme Icon
Family and Personal Identity Theme Icon
6. Slugs and Bananas. Chapter 6 marks Cody’s first log entry. He says that his father (Mo) is driving him crazy—all he does... (full context)
The Passage of Time  Theme Icon
Dreaming vs. The Real World Theme Icon
7. Wildlife. Another journal entry from Sophie comes next, and she says that she, Cody, and Brian took the dinghy to land after anchoring The Wandererin the harbor at Block... (full context)
Dreaming vs. The Real World Theme Icon
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8. The Dolt and the Orphan. Cody then writes about how he, Brian, and Sophie were walking along the island they visited... (full context)
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Cody also says that Sophie went up high in the bosun’s chair (a sling which lifts... (full context)
Family and Personal Identity Theme Icon
The Mysteries of Life and Death Theme Icon
...an entry saying the crew has left Block Island and is headed for Martha’s Vineyard. Cody, she adds, annoys his father (Mo), Brian, and Uncle Stew by never saying any of... (full context)
Dreaming vs. The Real World Theme Icon
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10. Ahoy. Cody writes an entry saying that he’s starting to enjoy “this sailing stuff.” He also says... (full context)
The Passage of Time  Theme Icon
Dreaming vs. The Real World Theme Icon
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11. Juggling. Sophie writes another entry, and says that Cody is still getting on Mo, Brian, and Stew’s nerves by refusing to use the proper... (full context)
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12. Blah-blah-blah.Cody says that it’s been a stupid day. Brian was “blah-blah-blahing about points of sail”like a... (full context)
Dreaming vs. The Real World Theme Icon
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14. Bompie and the Car. Cody writes an entry about the first Bompie story Sophie tells aboard The Wanderer. Bompie lived... (full context)
III. The Island
Dreaming vs. The Real World Theme Icon
...by imagining what it would be like to live the life of a fisherman, while Cody thinks she’s bizarre for being excited about something so seemingly boring and laborious. (full context)
Family and Personal Identity Theme Icon
16. Stranded. Cody writes an entry in his log saying that he asked Uncle Dock what happened to... (full context)
Men and Women Theme Icon
...cooking and cleaning, but none of the actual sailing and handiwork. When Sophie says that Cody does most of the cooking, Frank starts calling him Mr. Mom, and tells him that... (full context)
Dreaming vs. The Real World Theme Icon
18. Bompie and the Train. Cody writes in his log that he can’t figure Sophie out. She’s amazed by the smallest... (full context)
Dreaming vs. The Real World Theme Icon
Cody then writes about another Bompie story Sophie tells. When Bompie was young, he lived near... (full context)
Dreaming vs. The Real World Theme Icon
Family and Personal Identity Theme Icon
The Mysteries of Life and Death Theme Icon
When Sophie and Cody return to Grand Manan, Uncle Mo scolds them for getting themselves into potential danger. They... (full context)
Dreaming vs. The Real World Theme Icon
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20. The Little Kid. Cody writes his own entry about his trip with Sophie to Wood Island. He says that... (full context)
21. The Baptism. In Sophie’s next journal entry, she describes how she, Cody, and Brian all went to a boat-building shop owned by a man who specializes in... (full context)
Men and Women Theme Icon
Family and Personal Identity Theme Icon
22. Bompie and the Pastor. In Cody’s next journal, he says that he came up on Dock having another serious conversation—this time... (full context)
Dreaming vs. The Real World Theme Icon
Family and Personal Identity Theme Icon
Cody then retells another Bompie story from Sophie, this time about when Bompie was baptized. When... (full context)
IV. Under Way
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24. Oranges and Pizza.Cody writes that it’s unbelievable that the crew is finally getting under way. He says that... (full context)
Family and Personal Identity Theme Icon
26. Code.Codywrites that his dad gave his first lesson in radio code. While Cody thought it was... (full context)
The Passage of Time  Theme Icon
Dreaming vs. The Real World Theme Icon
28. Charlie-Oscar-Delta-Yankee. Cody again writes that The Wanderer is really moving along, with no detours, but that the... (full context)
Family and Personal Identity Theme Icon
...and Brian were looking for someone to blame. Naturally, they both pointed their fingers at Cody. When Cody described what had happened to the sails, instead of using the proper sailing... (full context)
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30. Knots.Cody writes that he learned how to tie a new kind of knot from Sophie. When... (full context)
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32. Bompie and the Swimming Hole. Cody then writes a log entry that records another one of Sophie’sBompie stories. When Bompie was... (full context)
Dreaming vs. The Real World Theme Icon
The Mysteries of Life and Death Theme Icon
...if he always gets in trouble whenever he goes into it. Sophie doesn’t answer, and Cody writes that she suddenly looks incredibly fragile after hearing Brian’s question. Cody replies to Brian’s... (full context)
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34. Little Kid Nightmares. Cody writes the next entry, and says that he’s been sleeping poorly because his father’s been... (full context)
V. Wind and Waves
The Passage of Time  Theme Icon
36. Bouncing. Cody writes a very brief entry about the sea rolling and bouncing, saying he wants to... (full context)
The Mysteries of Life and Death Theme Icon
38. Howling.Cody writes another brief entry saying that “it’s all wind and walls of water,” and that... (full context)
Dreaming vs. The Real World Theme Icon
Family and Personal Identity Theme Icon
The Mysteries of Life and Death Theme Icon
...As the crewmembers of The Wanderer find themselves in the middle of a vicious storm, Cody writes that he told his father he didn’t want to die. Mo replied by telling... (full context)
Men and Women Theme Icon
...she gets told to take the helm instead. Further, she says that when Dock chose Cody to help fix one of the sails instead of her, she “threw a little fit.”... (full context)
The Mysteries of Life and Death Theme Icon
42. Battling. As the storm gets worse, Sophie and Cody’s journal entries become short and terse for several chapters. In Battling, Cody says it’s better... (full context)
Family and Personal Identity Theme Icon
44. The Son. Cody then writes that his father told him he’d been a good son, but that he,... (full context)
Family and Personal Identity Theme Icon
The Mysteries of Life and Death Theme Icon
...saw Uncle Stew with his arm around Brian, and Uncle Mo with his arm around Cody, and then Uncle Dock holding the rail, looking out at the sea. She says that... (full context)
The Passage of Time  Theme Icon
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46. Bompie at the Ocean. Cody writes another entry about one of Sophie’s Bompie stories, which she told to Cody while... (full context)
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The Mysteries of Life and Death Theme Icon
48. Night. In Cody’s next entry, he writes that he tried to get a message to his mother last... (full context)
Dreaming vs. The Real World Theme Icon
The Mysteries of Life and Death Theme Icon
...wave. Sophie says she was stationed on lookout, with Uncle Dock in the cockpit and Cody at the wheel, when she noticed a wave approaching that was about fifty feet high,... (full context)
The Passage of Time  Theme Icon
Dreaming vs. The Real World Theme Icon
The Mysteries of Life and Death Theme Icon
...Mo, Brian, and Stew are also below deck; Brian lets her know that he’s seen Cody and Dock still on board—they’re just up on deck. Cody’s head had been banged up... (full context)
The Mysteries of Life and Death Theme Icon
51. Limping.Cody writes that the crew is “limping along by the seat of our pants.” He says... (full context)
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53. Bompie and his Father. Cody writes an entry about another Bompie story Sophie tells—she mentioned it after Cody asked if... (full context)
The Mysteries of Life and Death Theme Icon
54. Mr. Fix-It.In her next journal entry, Sophie writes that Cody has been very active in making boat repairs, working non-stop while the rest of the... (full context)
The Passage of Time  Theme Icon
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56. Useful. After Cody writes that The Wanderer has sails again (in Wet), Sophie writes an entry saying that... (full context)
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58. Little Kid: Push and Pull.Cody writes an entry about another story Sophie tells him—but this time, it’s not about Bompie.... (full context)
Dreaming vs. The Real World Theme Icon
Family and Personal Identity Theme Icon
...In Sophie’s next journal entry, she writes that Mo is trying to be kinder to Cody—Mo’s stopped barking at him and calling him names. She says that Cody doesn’t seem to... (full context)
The Passage of Time  Theme Icon
The Mysteries of Life and Death Theme Icon
Sophie then mentions a discussion she had with Cody about life. They wondered if people actually ever die, of if they just leave forever,... (full context)
The Passage of Time  Theme Icon
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The Mysteries of Life and Death Theme Icon
60. Questions. Cody writes the last log entry of the fifth section of the book, saying that he... (full context)
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Cody adds that he’s still not sure how Sophie knows Bompie’sstories, or if they even really... (full context)
VI. Land
Dreaming vs. The Real World Theme Icon
The Mysteries of Life and Death Theme Icon
...opens the last section of the book with a journal entry announcing that she and Cody spotted land—the coast of Ireland. Cody then writes his own log entry (Land) about his... (full context)
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62. Land. Cody adds that Uncle Stew and Mo got into a big argument. Stew was wondering who... (full context)
Dreaming vs. The Real World Theme Icon
64. New Body.Cody then writes his own account of the pub, and realizes that Sophie was mixing up... (full context)
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67. Phone Call. Cody then writes, in his own journal, that he and Sophie were able to phone home... (full context)
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Cody ends his journal entry saying that everyone is on a ferry crossing the Irish Sea... (full context)
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69. The Little Girl. In Cody’s next entry, he says that the crew has stopped at an Inn in Wales. While... (full context)
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The Mysteries of Life and Death Theme Icon
...arrives downstairs, everyone stops talking and stares at her. Then, the whole crew has dinner—and Cody writes that he could barely eat, because all he could do was look at Sophie,... (full context)
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Cody then writes that the crew just crossed the Severn River on a bridge, and has... (full context)
The Mysteries of Life and Death Theme Icon
71. The Cottage. Cody’snext entry details the crew’s arrival at Bompie’scottage. When they arrive, a nurse greets them, and... (full context)
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...Jonah is away at camp. He says the same thing to Mo and Stew. When Cody and Brian step forward, Bompie identifies them as Mo and Stew; when Sophie steps forward,... (full context)
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73. The Story. Cody’s next entry begins a week after they’ve arrived at Bompie’s. On the second day there,... (full context)
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...that the story is her own, Sophie puts her head on Bompie’s chest and cries. Cody says he left them there together, and about an hour later, Sophie came to him... (full context)
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75. Oh, Rosalie! Cody then writes an entry and says that Rosalie left Dock. She had plans she wasn’t... (full context)
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...taking up a list; a watercolor for Uncle Dock of The Wanderer; a drawing for Cody of him juggling; and a drawing for Sophie of her up in the bosun’s chair,... (full context)
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77. Remembering. In Cody’s last journal entry, he says that it was difficult saying goodbye to Uncle Dock and... (full context)
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Cody then writes that, while walking on the beach, he tried to suggest that the grandfather... (full context)
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Cody adds that Dock called and said that The Wanderer had been repaired and that he’d... (full context)
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...In her last journal entry, Sophie says that she’s happy to be home, and that Cody and Brian are staying with her for a couple of weeks. She says that her... (full context)