V for Vendetta

V for Vendetta

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Evey Hammond Character Analysis

Evey Hammond is 16 years old at the beginning of V for Vendetta, when she’s saved by V and taken to his underground lair to be his student and assistant. Initially, Evey finds V charming, and is highly grateful to him for saving her life. She assists him with some of his plans to attack the Norsefire government, but backs off when she realizes that V murders people in order to further his plans. Evey undergoes an enormous change when V, pretending to be a government agent, kidnaps and tortures her. Inspired by the example of Valerie, Evey learns to be strong and protect her integrity. Ultimately, she comes to embrace V’s aims of dismantling the Norsefire government, though she continues to refrain from killing people to do so. (Even when she blows up Downing Street, she makes it clear what she’s doing well in advance.) In a sense, Evey becomes less of a character as V for Vendetta goes on, and more of a symbol. In the final chapters, she’s embraced V’s ideology, as well as his Guy Fawkes mask, cloak, and hat, and seems to have found a student of her own. It’s suggested that she’ll continue to oppose government and tyranny, just as V has done before her.

Evey Hammond Quotes in V for Vendetta

The V for Vendetta quotes below are all either spoken by Evey Hammond or refer to Evey Hammond . For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Vertigo edition of V for Vendetta published in 2005.
Book 1, Chapter 3 Quotes

They got things under control. But then they started taking people away … all the black people and the Pakistanis. White people, too. All the radicals and the men who, you know, liked other men. The homosexuals. I don’t know what they did with them all.

Related Characters: Evey Hammond (speaker), V
Page Number: 28
Explanation and Analysis:

Evey describes her impressions of England during her childhood--the period when Fascists were first beginning to take over the country. As Evey makes clear, the Fascists began by arresting all "undesirable" people--mostly those who weren't white, heterosexual, and moderate in their thinking. Thus, blacks, homosexuals, Pakistanis, and radicals were arrested.

Evey doesn't know what happened to the undesirables--she doesn't yet understand that they were probably sent to camps and systematically murdered, like the Jews and other minorities during the Holocaust. Her innocence is obvious--at this early point in the graphic novel, she doesn't fully recognize how evil her own government really is. In general, Evey's attitude is typical of the people of England under Norsefire: she knows that the government arrested a lot of people, and she even seems to know that doing so was wrong--but she turns a blind eye to the real horrors of her government.

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Book 2, Chapter 1 Quotes

“Perhaps you don’t sort of fancy women. But, like, there’s nothing wrong with that. Or perhaps…”
“Or perhaps I’m your father?”

Related Characters: V (speaker), Evey Hammond (speaker)
Page Number: 96
Explanation and Analysis:

In this scene, V reveals that he can see through some of Evey's sexual issues—she's attracted to father-figures. Evey's father was arrested for his radical leftist politics when Evey was a small child, so she grew up without his presence.

Though V's statement is metaphorical, it's important to note that Moore never denies the possibility that V could be Evey's real father—indeed, we're told that "the man in room five" was tortured so frequently that he's lost all memory of who he used to be. In short, it's entirely possible that V is Evey's father, even if he doesn't remember the truth.

Either way, we should note that Evey consistently wants a father figure, and confuses this desire with her sexual desires. She's young and unsure of her place in the world—therefore, she craves a strong, fatherly authority to tell her what to do. Evey's desire for a father figure parallels England's desire for a strong, authoritative government, like Norsefire. Over the course of the graphic novel, V will liberate England from its desire for a government, and by the same token, he'll free Evey from her desire for a father figure.

Book 2, Chapter 12 Quotes

“Sign that statement. You could be out inside three years. Perhaps they’d find you a job with the Finger. A lot of your sort get work with the Finger.”
“Thank you… but I’d rather die behind the chemical sheds.”
“Then there’s nothing left to threaten with, is there? You are free.”

Related Characters: V (speaker), Evey Hammond (speaker)
Related Symbols: Valerie’s Letter
Page Number: 162
Explanation and Analysis:

In this scene, a "guard" orders Evey to sign a statement saying that V kidnapped and raped her--in other words, saying that Evey is innocent of all crimes, and V is guilty. By signing, Evey would be condemning V to execution (if the government could catch him) and saving herself.

Inspired by Valerie's letter, Evey makes the difficult decision to refuse to sign the statement. She would be ensuring her own survival, but she'd also be betraying her friend. Evey is effectively saying that she values her dignity--her honesty, her loyalty to V, etc.--more highly than her life.

Surprisingly, the guard who's been torturing Evey then tells her that she is "free." As Evey is about to discover, her imprisonment has been an elaborate test of her strength and integrity, a test that she's passed. Evey has found the elusive "freedom" that Valerie mentioned in her letter. By refusing to sacrifice her principles, Evey has freed herself of all fear of her guards. There is, quite literally, nothing to threaten her with anymore--because she's not afraid for her life anymore, she's "above" all control.

Book 2, Chapter 13 Quotes

“You say you want to set me free and you put me in a prison.”
“You were already in a prison. You’ve been in a prison all your life.”
“Shut up! I don’t want to hear it! I wasn’t in a prison! I was happy! I was happy until you threw me out.”
“Happiness is a prison, Evey. Happiness is the most insidious prison of all.”

Related Characters: V (speaker), Evey Hammond (speaker)
Page Number: 168
Explanation and Analysis:

In this scene, Evey discovers the truth: V has captured her, imprisoned her, tortured her, and threatened to kill her, with the goal of transforming her into someone who's unafraid of death. Evey is furious that V--someone she'd thought of as a friend--would mistreat her so horribly.

As V tries to explain his actions, he makes some important points about the nature of freedom. In V's view, most human beings believe that they're entitled to a certain measure of happiness--indeed, the highest good is to achieve happiness. The problem with such a philosophy, in V's view, is that it allows people to be manipulated. A happy citizen will readily accept injustice in his society, so long as it doesn't affect him. The people of England are "happy," which is why they look the other way when the Norsefire party murders innocent people. In all, V argues, the only way to make Evey into a moral, mature person is to cure her of her desire for happiness--in essence, her desire for life.

Book 2, Chapter 14 Quotes

“Thank you. Thank you for what you’ve done to me.”
“You did it all yourself. I simply provided the backdrop. The drama was all your own.”

Related Characters: V (speaker), Evey Hammond (speaker)
Page Number: 174
Explanation and Analysis:

In this important scene, Evey--who's previously been furious with V for kidnapping and torturing her--thanks V. Evey recognizes that V hurt her into order to make her into a stronger, more confident person. Evey is no longer afraid of death. As a result, she's no longer willing to accept injustice in her society--the government can't threaten and intimidate her into submission. It might be hard for readers to accept that V did the "right" thing by torturing Evey for months. Moore doesn't editorialize--he's said many times that readers are free to disagree with V and Evey.

Whether or not one agrees with V's action, it's important to notice that V has used violence and torture to transform Evey against her will--ironically, he's forced her into freedom. (It's only much later that Evey gives her assent to the entire process.) The paradoxical nature of V's behavior tells us something about his mission as a whole: V wants to liberate the people of England, whether they want to be liberated or not. To such an end, he'll use explosives, take lives, etc.--everything he does is justified, at least in his own mind, by the "greater good" of anarchy.

Book 3, Chapter 1 Quotes

Noise is relative to the silence proceeding it. The more absolute the hush, the more shocking the thunderclap. Our masters have not heard the people’s voice for generations, Evey. And it is much, much louder than they care to remember.

Related Characters: V (speaker), Evey Hammond
Page Number: 194
Explanation and Analysis:

In this scene, V prepares to plunge England into a state of complete anarchy. V plans to cut the power, turn off surveillance cameras, and dissolve communication networks. For the first time in years, the people of London will be allowed to do whatever they want, without government repercussions of any kind.

As V explains to Evey, the people of England are enormously powerful. In one sense, V's words should be taken as sinister: the people of England, united as a mob, can be as dangerous and frightening as a "thunderclap." V further implies that the leaders of Norsefire ("our masters") have made a grave mistake in underestimating the people--they're far more dangerous than Norsefire has given them credit for.

On the other hand, V's statements imply that the people of England are capable of some positive actions, not just mindless violence and destruction. But before we see what any of these "positive actions" look like, Moore invites readers to witness the English people's acts destruction--necessary precursors to an anarchist society.

Book 3, Chapter 9 Quotes

Because you were so big, V, and what if you’re just nobody? Or even if you’re someone, you’ll be smaller, because of all the people that you could have been, but weren’t.

Related Characters: Evey Hammond (speaker), V
Related Symbols: Guy Fawkes Mask, “V” symbol
Page Number: 250
Explanation and Analysis:

In this scene, Evey--witnessing V's death--makes the difficult decision to keep V's face and identity concealed. Instead of removing his mask, she keeps the mask on.

Evey is still curious about V's true identity, but ultimately, she recognizes that V's individual identity is less important than the "idea" of V--in other words, the idea of a powerful, resourceful opponent of the Norsefire government, someone who's immune to pain and danger. In short, Evey recognizes that V is more powerful as an idea, capable of inspiring other people, than he is as an ordinary man (or woman).

Evey's decision to keep V's mask on also reflects the fact that she's free of her desire to be controlled and to have a father-figure. Evey has craved a strong, masculine presence in her life, but now, she has no further need for such a presence. Evey has learned how to take care of herself--she doesn't even need V anymore. By the same token, Evey has no more need for Adam Susan's government--by donning V's spare mask, she resumes V's mission to destroy the government forever.

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Evey Hammond Character Timeline in V for Vendetta

The timeline below shows where the character Evey Hammond appears in V for Vendetta. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Book 1, Chapter 3: Victims
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
Fatherhood, Mentorship, and the State Theme Icon
...woman, who is resting. The man introduces himself as V, and the woman calls herself Evey Hammond. Although Evey insists that there’s nothing “special” about her, V asks her to tell... (full context)
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
Bigotry Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
Fatherhood, Mentorship, and the State Theme Icon
Evey continues explaining her story to V. In 1991, Evey’s mother died of one of the... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 4: Vaudeville
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
At the Shadow Gallery, V speaks with Evey. V explains that he’s actually a “very funny” person. Evey notices that V has changed... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 6: The Vision
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
Fatherhood, Mentorship, and the State Theme Icon
In the Shadow Gallery, Evey surveys a staircase, which is emblazoned with “V.V.V.V.V.” Evey asks V what this means. V... (full context)
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
Bigotry Theme Icon
Fatherhood, Mentorship, and the State Theme Icon
...agrees to accept this girl. Dennis sends in the girl, who turns out to be Evey, dressed in a childish pink dress. Bishop Lilliman smiles with pleasure and tells Evey that... (full context)
Book 3, Prologue
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Fatherhood, Mentorship, and the State Theme Icon
At the Shadow Gallery, Evey calls to V—she’s moving some things out of her room, since she doesn’t need them... (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 3: Various Valentines
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
Fatherhood, Mentorship, and the State Theme Icon
In the Shadow Gallery, V continues stacking dominoes. Evey enters the room, and notes that V is “almost finished.” V nods, and notes that... (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 4: Vestiges
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
Fatherhood, Mentorship, and the State Theme Icon
...outside Larkhill. He screams, “I’m free!” and raises his hands into the air, just as Evey did after being freed from her prison. (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 10: The Volcano
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Fatherhood, Mentorship, and the State Theme Icon
It is November 10, 1998. At 2 pm, the “new V” (Evey) stands over V’s body. V asked for a “Viking funeral,” Evey thinks. She realizes what... (full context)
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Fatherhood, Mentorship, and the State Theme Icon
...back to the surface. After a few moments, she takes off her mask: it is Evey. Evey watches a large explosion in the distance: Downing Street is no more. (full context)
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Fatherhood, Mentorship, and the State Theme Icon
Evey thinks to herself that the task ahead of her is phenomenally difficult, but crucial. She... (full context)