V for Vendetta

V for Vendetta

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Lewis Prothero Character Analysis

The “Voice of Fate,” Lewis Prothero performs a crucial service for the Norsefire government. Every night, he reads the information printed by the Fate Computer, so that his voice is broadcast over every television and radio in England. Thanks to clever propaganda, the people of England don’t realize that Prothero exists: they believe that Prothero’s voice—supposedly a “magnificent” voice—is the voice of the computer itself. Beneath the magnificence of his voice, Prothero is a foolish and cruel man, who once worked as a guard at Larkhill Prison, the concentration camp where V was imprisoned, and seemed to have no qualms about murdering innocent people there. Prothero is known to have a vast, impressive collection of dolls—a fact that makes Roger Dascombe consider him highly “sensitive” (seemingly a euphemism for homosexual, though this is never explored). In the end, Prothero’s fondness for dolls signals the manner of his undoing: V burns his dolls, thereby driving him insane.

Lewis Prothero Quotes in V for Vendetta

The V for Vendetta quotes below are all either spoken by Lewis Prothero or refer to Lewis Prothero . For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Vertigo edition of V for Vendetta published in 2005.
Book 1, Chapter 2 Quotes

They eradicated some cultures more thoroughly than they did others. No Tamla and no Trojan. No Billie Holliday or Black Uhuru. Just his master’s voice every hour on the hour.

Related Characters: V (speaker), The Leader / Adam Susan , Lewis Prothero
Page Number: 19
Explanation and Analysis:

V has taken Evey back to his secret lair, where he shows her his vast collection of old paintings, sculptures, books, and records. V explains that he's made a point of collecting cultural artifacts that Adam Susan's Norsefire government tried to destroy in previous decades. Susan sought to eliminate all "rival cultures"--anything that could compete with the dogma that the English are the greatest nation and the greatest race on the planet. Consequently, Norsefire destroyed the art and music of great African American artists like Billie Holliday.

V's explanation of Norsefire's crimes is one of the first signs of the extreme, racist nature of England in the future. Frightened for its own survival, English politicians rally their people around the hatred of "foreigners" and "aliens" of any kind--thus, black people, homosexuals, etc. are bullied, imprisoned, and often murdered for their supposed crimes. Susan's methods of control are typical of Fascist governments--like Hitler, he uses hatred and racism to unite his people against a common enemy.

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Lewis Prothero Character Timeline in V for Vendetta

The timeline below shows where the character Lewis Prothero appears in V for Vendetta. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Book 1, Chapter 1: The Villain
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Fatherhood, Mentorship, and the State Theme Icon
...building was demolished at night to avoid traffic congestion. One man, Dascombe, points out Lewis Prothero, the man who reads the “Voice of Fate” over the radio. (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 2: The Voice
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
On November 6, in the evening, Lewis Prothero, the Voice of Fate, is reading his messages over the radio, so that millions of... (full context)
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
Bigotry Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Dascombe argues cheerfully with Derek Almond. Dascombe points out that Prothero collects dolls—a strange habit for a man. He adds, wryly, that Prothero must be extremely... (full context)
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
At 12:30 pm on November 6, a group of government workers, including Lewis Prothero, sit in a train. Prothero loudly brags about having fought in the military, collecting dolls,... (full context)
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
As Prothero tells his stories, his colleagues notice a strange figure jumping onto the train. Suddenly the... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 3: Victims
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
...colleague, Dominic, climb aboard the train, which is now a crime scene. Finch walks to Prothero’s train car, where he finds a strange symbol: a V surrounded by a circle, carved... (full context)
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
Lewis Prothero wakes up in a strange arena, wearing an old military uniform. He sees a sign... (full context)
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
Fatherhood, Mentorship, and the State Theme Icon
...The Leader acknowledges that V has been successful in attacking his government’s credibility: with Lewis Prothero kidnapped, there will have to be a new Voice of Fate. This will be disastrous,... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 4: Vaudeville
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
V goes into a different room of the Shadow Gallery, where Lewis Prothero is standing in his uniform, very confused. Suddenly, V cries out, ”Good morning, campers!” Prothero... (full context)
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
V continues with his torture of Prothero. He drags him to a model of “Room V.” Prothero seems to understand what this... (full context)
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
...his broadcasting office. Mr. Almond knocks and tells Dascombe that the fingermen have found Lewis Prothero. Officers lead Lewis Prothero into the room: his face has been painted white, like a... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 6: The Vision
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
Bigotry Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
...for another mission. He takes a rose, identical to the one he left for Lewis Prothero, and leaves, reciting William Blake’s poem “Jerusalem” to himself. (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 8: The Valley
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
...carved onto the walls. Finch notices a rose, identical to the one left for Lewis Prothero. As Finch inspects the building, Dominic informs him that the music V was playing was... (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 4: Vestiges
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
Fatherhood, Mentorship, and the State Theme Icon
...Finch confesses that he’s taken drugs. Delia nods and points him toward two men, Lewis Prothero and Anthony Lilliman. They lead Finch into the depths of the camp, promising to fill... (full context)