V for Vendetta

V for Vendetta

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Roger Dascombe Character Analysis

An important agent of the Norsefire government’s broadcasting system, Roger Dascombe is one of the more ambiguous secondary characters in V for Vendetta. His talents for broadcasting and propaganda are so immense that the people of London go years without realizing that the Fate Computer has no actual voice—the true “Voice of Fate” is a human being, Lewis Prothero. Dascombe seems more aware of his government’s contradictions and hypocrisies, even if he only dares to speak of these hypocrisies in coded language. For instance, Dascombe mentions that Prothero is “sensitive” for collecting dolls—an obvious euphemism for queer or homosexual—and then calls the Leader “sensitive,” too. Dascombe’s awareness of the sexual hypocrisy in his society—in other words, of secret homoeroticism in an intensely homophobic society—suggests that he may be gay himself. Later, however, he seems to proposition Rosemary Almond, though we never see the end results of his proposition. In the end, Dascombe’s sexuality, as well as his true feelings about Norsefire, remain a mystery—he seems to be another bureaucrat, withholding his personal feelings to perform his job.
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Roger Dascombe Character Timeline in V for Vendetta

The timeline below shows where the character Roger Dascombe appears in V for Vendetta. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Book 1, Chapter 1: The Villain
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Fatherhood, Mentorship, and the State Theme Icon
...will explain that the building was demolished at night to avoid traffic congestion. One man, Dascombe, points out Lewis Prothero, the man who reads the “Voice of Fate” over the radio. (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 2: The Voice
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
...messages over the radio, so that millions of Londoners will be able to hear them. Dascombe explains to Derek Almond that Prothero will avoid talking about the fireworks following the explosion... (full context)
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
Bigotry Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Dascombe argues cheerfully with Derek Almond. Dascombe points out that Prothero collects dolls—a strange habit for... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 4: Vaudeville
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
In the evening, Roger Dascombe is working at his broadcasting office. Mr. Almond knocks and tells Dascombe that the fingermen... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 2: The Veil
Bigotry Theme Icon
...lowers into the ground, Rosemary thinks that she never liked him. At the funeral, Roger Dascombe comforts Rosemary, holding her hand for a little too long. Rosemary interprets this to mean... (full context)
Bigotry Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
We see Rosemary at dinner with Dascombe—she’s taken him up on her offer, realizing that she’ll have to do whatever she can... (full context)