V for Vendetta

V for Vendetta

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V is by far the most notable character in V for Vendetta: he has the greatest amount of dialogue, he is the subject of the most attention from the other characters, his name is in the title, etc. Yet in spite of all this, V is also the most ambiguous character in the graphic novel. We don’t know how old V is, we don’t know who his family was, we don’t know his sexual orientation, we don’t know what his face looks like (he wears a Guy Fawkes mask at all times), and we don’t even know to a certainty if he’s a man or a woman (for the purposes of this summary, we’ll consider him a man). Based on the evidence we’re presented with, it seems that V was a “subversive” who was arrested during the early days of the Norsefire regime and sent to a concentration camp. There, he was injected with drugs and hormones that made him smarter, made him stronger, and made him forget his own past. Since breaking out of his prison, V has used terrorism to oppose the Norsefire regime, killing his former jailers and orchestrating an elaborate assault on its institutions. V is an anarchist who believes that violence and destruction are necessary in order to establish a new world order in which people consent to live with each other in peace, rather than submitting to the tyranny of a government.

V Quotes in V for Vendetta

The V for Vendetta quotes below are all either spoken by V or refer to V . For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
). Note: all page and citation info for the quotes below refers to the Vertigo edition of V for Vendetta published in 2005.
Book 1, Chapter 1 Quotes

Remember, remember the fifth of November, the Gunpowder treason and plot. I know of no reason why the Gunpowder treason should ever be forgot.

Related Characters: V (speaker)
Page Number: 14
Explanation and Analysis:

Here V, the masked vigilante who's vowed to topple the Fascist government headed by Adam Susan, recites a poem about the "Gunpowder Treason," the infamous plot by Guy Fawkes to blow up the Houses of Parliament in the 1600s. (See Background Info.) As far as V is concerned, Guy Fawkes is a hero: a fellow vigilante who used his knowledge of explosives to attempt a sweeping revenge plot on a government he believed to be unjust.

The passage tells us a lot about V's twisted, whimsical approach to violence. V is talking about destroying enormous buildings and potentially killing innocent people--a crime belied by the innocent, sing-song nature of his poem. More importantly, V looks to Guy Fawkes for inspiration in his own vigilante acts, as even his mask is fashioned to look like Fawkes. V recognizes the importance of symbols and role models--just as he treats Fawkes as a hero, he hopes to inspire a new generation of anarchists to rise up against Susan and the Fascist party. By completing Fawkes's plot (i.e., blowing up Parliament 500 years later), V sends a powerful symbolic message: revolutionaries always win in the end, even if it takes them 500 years.

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Book 1, Chapter 2 Quotes

They eradicated some cultures more thoroughly than they did others. No Tamla and no Trojan. No Billie Holliday or Black Uhuru. Just his master’s voice every hour on the hour.

Related Characters: V (speaker), The Leader / Adam Susan , Lewis Prothero
Page Number: 19
Explanation and Analysis:

V has taken Evey back to his secret lair, where he shows her his vast collection of old paintings, sculptures, books, and records. V explains that he's made a point of collecting cultural artifacts that Adam Susan's Norsefire government tried to destroy in previous decades. Susan sought to eliminate all "rival cultures"--anything that could compete with the dogma that the English are the greatest nation and the greatest race on the planet. Consequently, Norsefire destroyed the art and music of great African American artists like Billie Holliday.

V's explanation of Norsefire's crimes is one of the first signs of the extreme, racist nature of England in the future. Frightened for its own survival, English politicians rally their people around the hatred of "foreigners" and "aliens" of any kind--thus, black people, homosexuals, etc. are bullied, imprisoned, and often murdered for their supposed crimes. Susan's methods of control are typical of Fascist governments--like Hitler, he uses hatred and racism to unite his people against a common enemy.

Book 1, Chapter 3 Quotes

They got things under control. But then they started taking people away … all the black people and the Pakistanis. White people, too. All the radicals and the men who, you know, liked other men. The homosexuals. I don’t know what they did with them all.

Related Characters: Evey Hammond (speaker), V
Page Number: 28
Explanation and Analysis:

Evey describes her impressions of England during her childhood--the period when Fascists were first beginning to take over the country. As Evey makes clear, the Fascists began by arresting all "undesirable" people--mostly those who weren't white, heterosexual, and moderate in their thinking. Thus, blacks, homosexuals, Pakistanis, and radicals were arrested.

Evey doesn't know what happened to the undesirables--she doesn't yet understand that they were probably sent to camps and systematically murdered, like the Jews and other minorities during the Holocaust. Her innocence is obvious--at this early point in the graphic novel, she doesn't fully recognize how evil her own government really is. In general, Evey's attitude is typical of the people of England under Norsefire: she knows that the government arrested a lot of people, and she even seems to know that doing so was wrong--but she turns a blind eye to the real horrors of her government.

Book 1, Chapter 5 Quotes

Her name is anarchy! And she has taught me more as a mistress than you ever did! She has taught me that justice is meaningless without freedom. She is honest. She makes no promises and breaks none.

Related Characters: V (speaker)
Related Symbols: Lady Justice
Page Number: 41
Explanation and Analysis:

In this scene, V holds a mock-conversation with the statue of Lady Justice that stands over the Old Bailey, a famous legal building in London. V accuses Lady Justice of serving an evil master--the Fascist government of England. V maintains that he serves a new master--not justice, but anarchy.

V's speech is important because it spells out his political convictions. Where Adam Susan, the dictator of England, believes that "justice" is all about control and domination (hence his decision to shut down free speech, imprison his opponents, etc.), V takes the opposite point of view. He thinks that the purpose of justice is to allow people to be free and happy; thus, the ideal state of society, he believes, is lack of any government whatsoever. ("Anarchy" literally means "without government.")

V's ideas about justice might seem just as counterintuitive and barbaric as Susan's--most people would probably argue that society needs a compromise between order and freedom. But Moore never once tells readers to agree with V--true to form, we're "free" to make up our own minds about how seriously we should take V's commitment to total anarchy.

Book 1, Chapter 11 Quotes

You see, there are two possible motives here. Not one. The first motive is revenge. He escapes from Larkhill and vows to get even with his tormentors. The Parliament bombing and the other stuff is just a smokescreen. The whole exercise was an elaborate, chilling vendetta. That’s the explanation that I find the most reassuring, funnily enough. Because that means he’s finished now. That means it’s over. The second motive is more sinister. Like I said, everyone who could have identified him is now dead. What if he’s just been clearing ground? What if he’s been planning something else?

Related Characters: Mr. Eric Finch (speaker), V , The Leader / Adam Susan
Page Number: 85
Explanation and Analysis:

Eric Finch, the head of detective work in the Norsefire government, tries to understand why V, known to be a masked vigilante, is murdering former Norsefire party members who worked at Larkhill Prison (where V himself was probably kept and tortured) years ago. Finch isn't sure if V is killing these people because he's angry with them and wants revenge, or because he's preparing for something else and trying to eliminate people who have valuable information about him—or both.

It's important to note the frightened tone of Finch's quote. He's afraid of and even awed by V's actions, and this is exactly what V wants: he wants to strike fear and uncertainty into the hearts of his enemies. And yet Finch's questions are valid--we're not any more sure of why V is doing what he's doing than we are. There's a fine line between V's personal vendetta and his broader commitment to ideals like freedom and justice. By wearing a Guy Fawkes mask and concealing his own identity, V can effectively enact two vendettas at the same time: he can satisfy his own personal desire for revenge while also fighting for his beliefs.

Book 2, Chapter 1 Quotes

“Perhaps you don’t sort of fancy women. But, like, there’s nothing wrong with that. Or perhaps…”
“Or perhaps I’m your father?”

Related Characters: V (speaker), Evey Hammond (speaker)
Page Number: 96
Explanation and Analysis:

In this scene, V reveals that he can see through some of Evey's sexual issues—she's attracted to father-figures. Evey's father was arrested for his radical leftist politics when Evey was a small child, so she grew up without his presence.

Though V's statement is metaphorical, it's important to note that Moore never denies the possibility that V could be Evey's real father—indeed, we're told that "the man in room five" was tortured so frequently that he's lost all memory of who he used to be. In short, it's entirely possible that V is Evey's father, even if he doesn't remember the truth.

Either way, we should note that Evey consistently wants a father figure, and confuses this desire with her sexual desires. She's young and unsure of her place in the world—therefore, she craves a strong, fatherly authority to tell her what to do. Evey's desire for a father figure parallels England's desire for a strong, authoritative government, like Norsefire. Over the course of the graphic novel, V will liberate England from its desire for a government, and by the same token, he'll free Evey from her desire for a father figure.

Book 2, Chapter 4 Quotes

It’s your basic unwillingness to get on within the company. You don’t seem to want to face up to real responsibility, or to be your own boss. Lord knows, you’ve been given plenty of opportunities. We’ve offered you promotion time and time again, and each time you’ve turned us down.

Related Characters: V (speaker)
Page Number: 114
Explanation and Analysis:

In this scene, V makes an illegal broadcast to the people of England, in which he takes on the persona of an office boss, having a "performance review" with a fictional employee. V uses the conceit of the office to criticize the people of England for eagerly submitting to the authority of Adam Susan's Fascist government. Although they have the potential to be their own masters--i.e., to survive with a government of any kind, let alone a brutal Fascist government--they chose to elect Susan and his thugs to rule over them. V's implication is that the people of England choose to be dominated: like Evey with her father-figure, they want someone to boss them around, even though don't need such a person by any stretch of the imagination.

I understand that you are unable to get on with your spouse. I hear that you argue. I am told that you shout. Violence has been mentioned.

Related Characters: V (speaker)
Page Number: 115
Explanation and Analysis:

V continues to use his broadcast to criticize the English people, adopting the language of an office boss conducting a performance review. Here, he attacks the people for the state of their family lives. There are "reports" of violence and arguing between husbands and wives. Based on what Moore shows us in the graphic novel, V isn't exaggerating: in England, Norsefire promotes an overall culture of cruelty, selfishness, and misogyny. Women are beaten and oppressed by their husbands, the people who are supposed to love them most.

V's critique of "family values" in England is particularly savage since the Norsefire government prides itself on the strength and unity of its culture, centered around the virtues of a family. If the families of England are secretly in a state of chaos, then this points to the basic flaws in Norsefire itself: a culture that pretends to be strong, happy, and perfect is in reality twisted, repressive, and at odds with itself.

We’ve had a string of embezzlers, frauds, liars and lunatics making a string of catastrophic decisions. This is plain fact. But who elected them?

Related Characters: V (speaker)
Page Number: 116
Explanation and Analysis:

V continues his illegal broadcast, addressing the people of England. Here, he makes an important point about the dictators of history, Susan included: although dictators are usually singled out for their evil, brutality, etc., they don't ever gain power alone. As bad as someone like Hitler was, one could argue that the German electorate itself is also to blame for his action--the millions of "normal" people who voluntarily elected Hitler to rule over them, and then obeyed his orders once he was in power. In short, V recognizes that the people of England are partly to blame for their own suffering. In their fear and haste, they chose to elect a brutal Fascist to rule their country--a man whom they knew to be dangerous, but who promised to bring them order and protection.

Although V's speech might sound angry or scolding, it also has a strong undertone of respectful disappointment. V faults the English people for electing Susan, but unlike most, he fully recognizes that the English people have the capacity to be better--to rule themselves. V also recognizes that the people of England are stronger than their own government--they're afraid of Susan, but if they were to rise up together against the government, they'd be unstoppable. V's mission is twofold: on one hand, he aims to weaken the government. But his anti-Norsefire plans would be pointless unless he inspired the people to rebel against Norsefire as well.

Book 2, Chapter 12 Quotes

“Sign that statement. You could be out inside three years. Perhaps they’d find you a job with the Finger. A lot of your sort get work with the Finger.”
“Thank you… but I’d rather die behind the chemical sheds.”
“Then there’s nothing left to threaten with, is there? You are free.”

Related Characters: V (speaker), Evey Hammond (speaker)
Related Symbols: Valerie’s Letter
Page Number: 162
Explanation and Analysis:

In this scene, a "guard" orders Evey to sign a statement saying that V kidnapped and raped her--in other words, saying that Evey is innocent of all crimes, and V is guilty. By signing, Evey would be condemning V to execution (if the government could catch him) and saving herself.

Inspired by Valerie's letter, Evey makes the difficult decision to refuse to sign the statement. She would be ensuring her own survival, but she'd also be betraying her friend. Evey is effectively saying that she values her dignity--her honesty, her loyalty to V, etc.--more highly than her life.

Surprisingly, the guard who's been torturing Evey then tells her that she is "free." As Evey is about to discover, her imprisonment has been an elaborate test of her strength and integrity, a test that she's passed. Evey has found the elusive "freedom" that Valerie mentioned in her letter. By refusing to sacrifice her principles, Evey has freed herself of all fear of her guards. There is, quite literally, nothing to threaten her with anymore--because she's not afraid for her life anymore, she's "above" all control.

Book 2, Chapter 13 Quotes

“You say you want to set me free and you put me in a prison.”
“You were already in a prison. You’ve been in a prison all your life.”
“Shut up! I don’t want to hear it! I wasn’t in a prison! I was happy! I was happy until you threw me out.”
“Happiness is a prison, Evey. Happiness is the most insidious prison of all.”

Related Characters: V (speaker), Evey Hammond (speaker)
Page Number: 168
Explanation and Analysis:

In this scene, Evey discovers the truth: V has captured her, imprisoned her, tortured her, and threatened to kill her, with the goal of transforming her into someone who's unafraid of death. Evey is furious that V--someone she'd thought of as a friend--would mistreat her so horribly.

As V tries to explain his actions, he makes some important points about the nature of freedom. In V's view, most human beings believe that they're entitled to a certain measure of happiness--indeed, the highest good is to achieve happiness. The problem with such a philosophy, in V's view, is that it allows people to be manipulated. A happy citizen will readily accept injustice in his society, so long as it doesn't affect him. The people of England are "happy," which is why they look the other way when the Norsefire party murders innocent people. In all, V argues, the only way to make Evey into a moral, mature person is to cure her of her desire for happiness--in essence, her desire for life.

Book 2, Chapter 14 Quotes

“Thank you. Thank you for what you’ve done to me.”
“You did it all yourself. I simply provided the backdrop. The drama was all your own.”

Related Characters: V (speaker), Evey Hammond (speaker)
Page Number: 174
Explanation and Analysis:

In this important scene, Evey--who's previously been furious with V for kidnapping and torturing her--thanks V. Evey recognizes that V hurt her into order to make her into a stronger, more confident person. Evey is no longer afraid of death. As a result, she's no longer willing to accept injustice in her society--the government can't threaten and intimidate her into submission. It might be hard for readers to accept that V did the "right" thing by torturing Evey for months. Moore doesn't editorialize--he's said many times that readers are free to disagree with V and Evey.

Whether or not one agrees with V's action, it's important to notice that V has used violence and torture to transform Evey against her will--ironically, he's forced her into freedom. (It's only much later that Evey gives her assent to the entire process.) The paradoxical nature of V's behavior tells us something about his mission as a whole: V wants to liberate the people of England, whether they want to be liberated or not. To such an end, he'll use explosives, take lives, etc.--everything he does is justified, at least in his own mind, by the "greater good" of anarchy.

Book 3, Chapter 1 Quotes

Noise is relative to the silence proceeding it. The more absolute the hush, the more shocking the thunderclap. Our masters have not heard the people’s voice for generations, Evey. And it is much, much louder than they care to remember.

Related Characters: V (speaker), Evey Hammond
Page Number: 194
Explanation and Analysis:

In this scene, V prepares to plunge England into a state of complete anarchy. V plans to cut the power, turn off surveillance cameras, and dissolve communication networks. For the first time in years, the people of London will be allowed to do whatever they want, without government repercussions of any kind.

As V explains to Evey, the people of England are enormously powerful. In one sense, V's words should be taken as sinister: the people of England, united as a mob, can be as dangerous and frightening as a "thunderclap." V further implies that the leaders of Norsefire ("our masters") have made a grave mistake in underestimating the people--they're far more dangerous than Norsefire has given them credit for.

On the other hand, V's statements imply that the people of England are capable of some positive actions, not just mindless violence and destruction. But before we see what any of these "positive actions" look like, Moore invites readers to witness the English people's acts destruction--necessary precursors to an anarchist society.

Book 3, Chapter 4 Quotes

Because if I’m going to crack this case, and I am, I’m going to have to get right inside his head, to think the way he thinks, and that scares me.

Related Characters: Mr. Eric Finch (speaker), V
Page Number: 210
Explanation and Analysis:

Eric Finch, the detective tasked with tracking down V, decides that the only way to catch V is to think like V. (This is one of the classic plot tropes of crime and serial killer stories--the detective discovers that he and his quarry eerily similar.) In order to simulate V's state of mind, Finch ingests a large quantity of LSD, a hallucinogenic drug that, he believes, promotes creativity and original thinking.

By taking LSD and thinking like V, Finch isn't just trying to solve his case. Finch is also trying to free himself from the constraints of his own society. Finch is secretly a good man who opposes the tyranny of Norsefire's regime. But just like everyone else, he's too frightened and cynical to attempt to oppose Norsefire, and he goes through life accepting injustice in his society. The fact that Finch subconsciously wants to be like V is a clear sign that he's fed up with being a pawn to Adam Susan and other Norsefire officials--he wants to escape the government's authority by first freeing his mind from fear.

Book 3, Chapter 7 Quotes

“Did you think to kill me? There’s no flesh or blood within this cloak to kill. There’s only an idea. Ideas are bulletproof.”

Related Characters: V (speaker), Mr. Eric Finch
Related Symbols: Guy Fawkes Mask, “V” symbol
Page Number: 236
Explanation and Analysis:

In this important scene, Eric Finch tracks down V and shoots him. V (secretly bleeding to death) tells Finch that nobody can kill him, because he's an idea, not a man.

V's statement isn't literally true, of course, but it's very powerful (and one of the most famous quotes from the work). V is a human being, but he's also much more. By wearing a cloak and a Guy Fawkes mask, V aims to erase his own personality and become a symbol. As a symbol, something without the flaws and complexities of a real human, V can inspire millions of other people with just his ideas, courage, and image.

Sure enough, a few chapters later, "V" is dead, but Evey has taken V's cloak and mask, effectively becoming the "new V." Ultimately, V isn't a person--it's a role, which can be played by many different people.

Book 3, Chapter 9 Quotes

Because you were so big, V, and what if you’re just nobody? Or even if you’re someone, you’ll be smaller, because of all the people that you could have been, but weren’t.

Related Characters: Evey Hammond (speaker), V
Related Symbols: Guy Fawkes Mask, “V” symbol
Page Number: 250
Explanation and Analysis:

In this scene, Evey--witnessing V's death--makes the difficult decision to keep V's face and identity concealed. Instead of removing his mask, she keeps the mask on.

Evey is still curious about V's true identity, but ultimately, she recognizes that V's individual identity is less important than the "idea" of V--in other words, the idea of a powerful, resourceful opponent of the Norsefire government, someone who's immune to pain and danger. In short, Evey recognizes that V is more powerful as an idea, capable of inspiring other people, than he is as an ordinary man (or woman).

Evey's decision to keep V's mask on also reflects the fact that she's free of her desire to be controlled and to have a father-figure. Evey has craved a strong, masculine presence in her life, but now, she has no further need for such a presence. Evey has learned how to take care of herself--she doesn't even need V anymore. By the same token, Evey has no more need for Adam Susan's government--by donning V's spare mask, she resumes V's mission to destroy the government forever.

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V Character Timeline in V for Vendetta

The timeline below shows where the character V appears in V for Vendetta. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Book 1, Chapter 3: Victims
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
Fatherhood, Mentorship, and the State Theme Icon
...Gallery, the masked man greets the woman, who is resting. The man introduces himself as V, and the woman calls herself Evey Hammond. Although Evey insists that there’s nothing “special” about... (full context)
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
Bigotry Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
Fatherhood, Mentorship, and the State Theme Icon
Evey continues explaining her story to V. In 1991, Evey’s mother died of one of the diseases spread by the nuclear fallout.... (full context)
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
Fatherhood, Mentorship, and the State Theme Icon
...and Mr. Finch has gone to visit the Leader. Finch explains to the Leader that “V,” as he’s been called, is a psychopath, capable of killing for any reason. The Leader... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 4: Vaudeville
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
At the Shadow Gallery, V speaks with Evey. V explains that he’s actually a “very funny” person. Evey notices that... (full context)
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
V goes into a different room of the Shadow Gallery, where Lewis Prothero is standing in... (full context)
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
V continues with his torture of Prothero. He drags him to a model of “Room V.”... (full context)
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
The narrative cuts to “Scotland Yard, later.” V, wearing his usual cloak and mask, skillfully maneuvers his way past a security guard. When... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 6: The Vision
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
Fatherhood, Mentorship, and the State Theme Icon
In the Shadow Gallery, Evey surveys a staircase, which is emblazoned with “V.V.V.V.V.” Evey asks V what this means. V explains that it’s shorthand for a Latin phrase... (full context)
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
Bigotry Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
Meanwhile, in the Shadow Gallery, V prepares for another mission. He takes a rose, identical to the one he left for... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 8: The Valley
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
...Bishop Lilliman’s home, it is the morning of December 21, 1997. Inside, they find another “V” carved onto the walls. Finch notices a rose, identical to the one left for Lewis... (full context)
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
Bigotry Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
...night before. Bishop Lilliman was alone in his room with a prostitute—probably an accomplice of V’s, Finch guesses, since she’s nowhere to be found. Late in the night, Dennis went into... (full context)
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
Alone with Bishop Lilliman, V offered him the chance to take communion. V gave Bishop Lilliman a communion “wafer,” which... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 2: The Veil
Bigotry Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
As Rosemary continues to think about her loneliness, we see V walking through a strange, deserted building. V sees a poster for a film called The... (full context)
Book 3, Prologue
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Fatherhood, Mentorship, and the State Theme Icon
At the Shadow Gallery, Evey calls to V—she’s moving some things out of her room, since she doesn’t need them anymore. V nods,... (full context)
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
Bigotry Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
V stands on the roof of his home, mock-conducting the skyline. Suddenly, there is an enormous... (full context)
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
Fatherhood, Mentorship, and the State Theme Icon
We see the “Voice of Fate” broadcasting in radios and televisions all over London. The voice announces that 400... (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 1: Vox Populi
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
...the ground, chanting “Bollocks Mr. Susan, bollocks Fate.” On the wall, she spray-paints the same “V” symbol that V makes. (full context)
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
...she was a Paki.” As this conversation goes on, we shift to a view of V’s smiling mask. V notes that the “silent majority” is easily destroyed—all it takes is one... (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 3: Various Valentines
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
...we recognize, to those that Dominic was just discussing. We then see a close-up of V, stacking dominoes on the floor. (full context)
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
Fatherhood, Mentorship, and the State Theme Icon
In the Shadow Gallery, V continues stacking dominoes. Evey enters the room, and notes that V is “almost finished.” V... (full context)
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
V stands up, looking at the rows of dominoes he’s set up. The dominoes are arranged... (full context)
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
Fatherhood, Mentorship, and the State Theme Icon
...Dominic bursts into the Leader’s office. Without any introductions, Dominic explains that he knows how V has been orchestrating his terrorist attacks: V has had access to the Fate Computer for... (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 4: Vestiges
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
...7, 1998, Eric Finch arrives at Larkhill Camp. He realizes why he’s failed to catch V—he’s been unable to think like V. In order to do so, he decides he will... (full context)
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
Fatherhood, Mentorship, and the State Theme Icon
Finch feels himself floating into the very room where V once lived: Room Five. As he lies in Room Five, Finch realizes that he, and... (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 6: Vectors
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
Bigotry Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Vendettas, Revenge, and the Personal Theme Icon
Fatherhood, Mentorship, and the State Theme Icon
...the point where he can assume power after the Leader is deposed. We see that V is watching Helen and Harper talk, using his own access to the Fate Computer and... (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 10: The Volcano
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Fatherhood, Mentorship, and the State Theme Icon
...speaks into a microphone, and her voice is broadcast across London. She introduces herself as V, noting wryly that reports of her death were “exaggerated.” V announces that tomorrow, Downing Street—the... (full context)
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Fatherhood, Mentorship, and the State Theme Icon
After giving her speech, V retreats from the roof. Inspired by V’s speech, the people of London attack the police,... (full context)
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Fatherhood, Mentorship, and the State Theme Icon
It is November 10, 1998. At 2 pm, the “new V” (Evey) stands over V’s body. V asked for a “Viking funeral,” Evey thinks. She realizes... (full context)
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Fatherhood, Mentorship, and the State Theme Icon
The “new V” leaves the train station and climbs back to the surface. After a few moments, she... (full context)
Freedom and Anarchy Theme Icon
The Power of Symbols Theme Icon
Fatherhood, Mentorship, and the State Theme Icon
...riot, lying on the floor. The man awakes and asks where he is. The new V welcomes the man, and explains that they are in the Shadow Gallery—her home. (full context)