A line-by-line translation

Shakespeare's Sonnets

A line-by-line translation

Shakespeare's Sonnets

Shakespeare's Sonnets Translation Sonnet 121

Line Map Clear Line Map Add

'Tis better to be vile than vile esteemed, When not to be receives reproach of being, And the just pleasure lost which is so deemed Not by our feeling but by others' seeing. For why should others' false adulterate eyes Give salutation to my sportive blood? Or on my frailties why are frailer spies, Which in their wills count bad what I think good? No, I am that I am, and they that level At my abuses reckon up their own; I may be straight, though they themselves be bevel. By their rank thoughts my deeds must not be shown, Unless this general evil they maintain: All men are bad, and in their badness reign.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elL
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing el
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consec
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adip
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, co
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscin
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing el
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectet
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur
Lorem ipLorem ipsum dolor sit Lorem ipsum
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed d
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur ad
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing eli

Sonnets
Join LitCharts A+ and get the entire Shakespeare's Sonnets Translation as a printable PDF.
LitCharts A+ members also get:
  • Downloadable translations of every Shakespeare play and sonnet
  • Downloads of 491 LitCharts Lit Guides
  • Explanations and citation info for 13,129 quotes covering 491 books
  • Teacher Editions for every Lit Guide
  • PDFs defining 124 key Lit Terms