A Brief History of Seven Killings

A Brief History of Seven Killings

by

Marlon James

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Kim Clarke Character Analysis

Kim Clarke is the first of Nina’s alter-egos. She lives in Montego Bay with her boyfriend, Chuck, whom she compels herself to love even though he also deeply irritates her. Kim is desperate to move to the United States, and has sex with a man in the visa office in order to secure a visa. When Chuck reveals that he is married and will be returning home to the States, Kim blackmails him by threatening to reveal the affair to his wife.
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Kim Clarke Character Timeline in A Brief History of Seven Killings

The timeline below shows where the character Kim Clarke appears in A Brief History of Seven Killings. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 1, Chapter 4
Violence vs. Peace Theme Icon
Masculinity, Sexuality, and Homophobia Theme Icon
Jamaican Culture and Identity Theme Icon
Politics, Power, and Corruption Theme Icon
Nina’s father has been unable to speak since the robbery, and her sister Kimmy has failed to visit their parents since the incident. Nina recalls her relationship with a... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 7
Violence vs. Peace Theme Icon
Masculinity, Sexuality, and Homophobia Theme Icon
Jamaican Culture and Identity Theme Icon
Politics, Power, and Corruption Theme Icon
Nina is still waiting across the road from the Singer’s house. She wishes Kimmy would visit their parents, and wants to make a plan with her sister about how... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 15
Masculinity, Sexuality, and Homophobia Theme Icon
Politics, Power, and Corruption Theme Icon
...him naked on his balcony eating fruit she took off her clothes and joined him. Kimmy is dating Ras Trent, a bass player and son of the Minister of Tourism. (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 7
Masculinity, Sexuality, and Homophobia Theme Icon
Jamaican Culture and Identity Theme Icon
Politics, Power, and Corruption Theme Icon
Kimmy calls Nina, a rare occurrence ever since Ras told her to cut ties with those... (full context)
Masculinity, Sexuality, and Homophobia Theme Icon
Jamaican Culture and Identity Theme Icon
Nina once went with Kimmy to a “twelve tribes” gathering for Rastas, where all the women were dressed in modest... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 12
Masculinity, Sexuality, and Homophobia Theme Icon
Jamaican Culture and Identity Theme Icon
...her mother calls and says to come to Nina’s parents’ house immediately. When she arrives, Kimmy opens the door, and Nina asks her mother what’s going on. Nina’s mother begins yelling... (full context)
Violence vs. Peace Theme Icon
Masculinity, Sexuality, and Homophobia Theme Icon
Jamaican Culture and Identity Theme Icon
Kimmy knows that Nina won’t point out that Kimmy also slept with the Singer, as this... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 16
Jamaican Culture and Identity Theme Icon
Politics, Power, and Corruption Theme Icon
...of the apocalyptic place that Jamaica is becoming. She is furious with her father, with Kimmy, and with the Singer. Yet she is walking toward the Singer’s house, determined to get... (full context)
Part 3, Chapter 1
Masculinity, Sexuality, and Homophobia Theme Icon
Jamaican Culture and Identity Theme Icon
Part Three is set on February 15, 1979. Every time Kim Clarke gets on a bus, she feels sure it is about to explode. Her boyfriend Chuck... (full context)
Part 4, Chapter 19
Jamaican Culture and Identity Theme Icon
Witness and Storytelling Theme Icon
...for her funeral. Dorcas then mentions that before becoming Dorcas Palmer, she was known as Kim Clarke . (full context)
Part 5, Chapter 12
Violence vs. Peace Theme Icon
Jamaican Culture and Identity Theme Icon
Politics, Power, and Corruption Theme Icon
Witness and Storytelling Theme Icon
...and makes a call. A woman on the other end says “Hello?” and Millicent says: “Kimmy?” (full context)