A Brief History of Time

A Brief History of Time

These stars are supported against their own gravity by the exclusion principle between neutrons, so they do not collapse into black holes. They are very small, cold, and dense. Certain kinds are called pulsars because they emit pulses of radio waves.
Get the entire A Brief History of Time LitChart as a printable PDF.
A brief history of time.pdf.medium

Neutron stars Term Timeline in A Brief History of Time

The timeline below shows where the term Neutron stars appears in A Brief History of Time. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 6
Human Curiosity and Ingenuity Theme Icon
...showed that stars supported by the exclusion principle acting between protons and neutrons would become neutron star s, which are much smaller and denser than white dwarves. (full context)
Human Curiosity and Ingenuity Theme Icon
...to see in the earth, but in a system called PSR 1913 + 16, two neutron star s are orbiting each other. J. H. Taylor and R. A. Hulse won the Nobel... (full context)
Human Curiosity and Ingenuity Theme Icon
...1967, Jocelyn Bell-Burnell and her supervisor Anthony Hewish found a pulsar, which is a rotating neutron star . It was the first of its kind of be found, and held out hope... (full context)
Human Curiosity and Ingenuity Theme Icon
...object is far above the Chandrasekhar limit, meaning it is not a white dwarf or neutron star . It is most likely a black hole. (full context)
Chapter 8
Human Curiosity and Ingenuity Theme Icon
...as they contract again. The central portions of the star contract into dense regions, becoming neutron star s or black holes, though this is not yet fully understood. Sometimes outer parts of... (full context)