A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court

by

Mark Twain

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Clarence Character Analysis

Clarence is a 12-year-old page at the court of King Arthur when Hank Morgan finds himself thrown into medieval England. Although everyone believes Sir Kay’s claims that Hank is a dangerous monster with sharp teeth and claws, Clarence nevertheless befriends the man. This suggests his innate good sense and his ability to rely on hard evidence rather than the superstitious beliefs of his peers. Nevertheless, Clarence initially believes in Merlin’s power, suggesting the strength of the beliefs that his medieval society trained into him in his childhood. After Hank proves himself to be more powerful than Merlin, Clarence becomes Hank’s protégé, helping him to establish the “man factories” that will introduce 19th-century civilization into Arthurian England. Although Clarence truly believes in the value of Hank’s civilization project, he still clings to aspects of his medieval training, like his instinctive respect for the institution of monarchy. Nevertheless, he follows and supports Hank until his death in the cave where Hank and his true believers made their final stand for civilization over barbaric chivalry.

Clarence Quotes in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court

The A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court quotes below are all either spoken by Clarence or refer to Clarence. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
New World vs. Old World  Theme Icon
).
Chapter 26 Quotes

Expedition No. 3 will start adout the first of mext █ month █ on a search f8r Sir Sagramour le Desirous. It is in command of the renowned Knight of the Red Lawns, assisted by Sir Persant of Inde, who is compete9t, intelligent, courteous, and in every ʍay a brick, and further assisted by Sir Palamides the Saracen, who is no huckleberry himself. This is no pic-nic, these boys mean busine&s.

Related Characters: Clarence (speaker), Hank Morgan , Sir Sagramore
Page Number: 198
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 40 Quotes

The worship of royalty being founded in unreason, these graceful and harmless cats would easily become as sacred as any other royalties, and indeed more so, because it would presently be noticed that they hanged nobody, beheaded nobody, imprisoned nobody, inflicted no cruelties or injustices of any sort, and so must be worthy of a deeper love and reverence than the customary human king, and would certainly get it. The eyes of the whole harried world would soon be fixed upon this humane and gentle system, and royal butchers would presently begin to disappear; their subjects would fill the vacancies with catlings from our own royal house; we should become a factory; we should supply the thrones of the world; within forty years all Europe would be governed by cats, wand we should furnish the cats. The reign of universal peace would begin then, to end no more forever…M-e-e-e-yow-ow-ow—fzt—wow!

Related Characters: Clarence (speaker), Hank Morgan , Sir Sagramore
Related Symbols: Factories
Page Number: 305
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 42 Quotes

“From our various works I selected all the men—boys I mean—whose faithfulness under whatsoever pressure I could swear to, and I called them together secretly and gave them their instructions. There are fifty-two of them; none younger than fourteen, and none above seventeen years old.”

“Why did you select boys?”

“Because all the others were born in an atmosphere of superstition and reared in it. It is in their blood and bones. We imagined we had educated it out of them; they thought so, too; the Interdict woke them up like a thunderclap! It revealed them to themselves, and it revealed them to me, too. With boys it was different. Such as have been under our training from seven to ten years have had no acquaintance with the Church’s terrors, and it was amongst these that I found my fifty-two.”

Related Characters: Clarence (speaker), Hank Morgan , Mordred, King Arthur
Related Symbols: Factories
Page Number: 322
Explanation and Analysis:
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Clarence Character Timeline in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court

The timeline below shows where the character Clarence appears in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 2: King Arthur’s Court
Superiority, Power, and Authority Theme Icon
...like “me seemeth” and “comfort [my] very liver.” Finally, a page boy (later identified as Clarence) fetches Hank. The boy chatters cheerfully and then casually mentions that he was born in... (full context)
Nature vs. Nurture  Theme Icon
Superiority, Power, and Authority Theme Icon
For some reason, Hank believes Clarence immediately. He is overwhelmed with sadness at the thought that no one he knows will... (full context)
Superiority, Power, and Authority Theme Icon
Deciding to call the boy Clarence, Hank asks about the man who brought him to Camelot. Clarence explains that his captor... (full context)
Chapter 3: Knights of the Table Round
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Superiority, Power, and Authority Theme Icon
Then Clarence’s face falls; Merlin is about to tell the long-winded and sleep-inducing story of how King... (full context)
Chapter 4: Sir Dinadan the Humorist
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...a string of bad jokes that everyone but Hank (who’s heard them all before) and Clarence (who calls them “rotten”) appreciate. (full context)
Chapter 5: An Inspiration
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...asleep. Waking up, he initially thinks he’s had a strange dream, but then he sees Clarence in his cell. He’s scared when he realizes that this isn’t a dream and he’s... (full context)
Imperialism  Theme Icon
Superiority, Power, and Authority Theme Icon
...for “old humbug” Merlin or the “chuckleheaded […] superstitions” his so-called magic relies on. But Clarence’s very real fear and respect for Merlin’s power give Hank an idea. Hank tells Clarence... (full context)
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With Clarence gone, Hank has two unsettling thoughts. First, he worries that the boy will realize it’s... (full context)
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Hank confirms with Clarence that it’s the 20th of June and that his execution is set for the next... (full context)
Chapter 6: The Eclipse
Superiority, Power, and Authority Theme Icon
...the guards reply that it’s been moved forward. As they lead Hank into the courtyard, Clarence proudly explains that he’s responsible for the shift. To help Hank escape bondage without permanent... (full context)
Superiority, Power, and Authority Theme Icon
...the date again with the monk, who says it’s the 21st of June. Earlier, when Clarence gave Hank the date, he was mistaken.  (full context)
Chapter 7: Merlin’s Tower
New World vs. Old World  Theme Icon
Superiority, Power, and Authority Theme Icon
...Hank uses the time to make blasting powder and a lightning rod which he and Clarence place in the crumbling tower, which was built centuries earlier by the Romans. (full context)
Chapter 11: The Yankee in Search of Adventure
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...knights beg for the honor of the quest, the king (Arthur) assigns it to Hank. Clarence is as excited as Hank is annoyed. (full context)
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Nature vs. Nurture  Theme Icon
...that fixed locations are a vain attempt to thwart his will. When Hank complains to Clarence that he can’t imagine how he’s supposed to find the castle without a map, Clarence... (full context)
Chapter 21: The Pilgrims
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Hank sends Ozana back to Camelot with a requisition for Clarence to send men and supplies from the Chemical Department to the Valley of Holiness as... (full context)
Chapter 24: A Rival Magician
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...have established an office in the Valley. The clerk in the cavern connects Hank to Clarence at Camelot, who tells Hank that the king and queen are on the way to... (full context)
Imperialism  Theme Icon
Clarence further reports that King Arthur, delighted with Hank’s idea to raise as standing army, has... (full context)
Chapter 36: An Encounter in the Dark
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Imperialism  Theme Icon
Superiority, Power, and Authority Theme Icon
...the well-dressed noble people recognize Arthur and Hank. Hank is relieved, however, to see that Clarence is still carrying on his work, as evidenced by a newspaper boy and a telephone... (full context)
Chapter 37: An Awful Predicament
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...follows the telegraph line to the local office. He orders the surprised clerk to call Clarence at Camelot. After ordering the clerk to leave, he taps out a coded message, telling... (full context)
Chapter 39: The Yankee’s Fight with the Knights
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...16th of the month. He pastes into the narrative a torn-away clipping of the editorial Clarence wrote about the affair, which makes several novel points about this duel. First, spectators will... (full context)
Chapter 40: Three Years Later
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Clarence is eager for the revolution, too, although he worries that getting rid of the royal... (full context)
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Imperialism  Theme Icon
Just as Hank is about to scold Clarence for his jokes, Sandy rushes in. Hank and Sandy’s daughter, Hello-Central, is seriously ill with... (full context)
Chapter 42: War!
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Hank finds a melancholy Clarence brooding in his quarters. Clarence recognizes his boss instantly, despite the disguise. He tells Hank... (full context)
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Hank wants to know how Arthur is doing now, and Clarence explains that Arthur died and Guenever retired to a convent. The Interdict is still in... (full context)
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Fortunately, Clarence has been busy. He selected 52 faithful followers between the ages of 14 and 17—old... (full context)
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Clarence wants to wait for the fury of the knights and the Church to break over... (full context)
Chapter 43: The Battle of the Sand Belt
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In Merlin’s Cave, Hank, Clarence, and their 52 “fresh, bright, well-educated, clean-minded […] British boys” wait for the onslaught. Hank... (full context)
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Nature vs. Nurture  Theme Icon
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...the 50-odd “minds” in the cave and their only chance for survival is unconditional surrender. Clarence laughs at the message then reminds him what they knights will do: they will disregard... (full context)
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...the ditch, he turns on the power to the two innermost electric fences. He and Clarence approach the fences to watch the show, where they find a knight has already touched... (full context)
Chapter 44: A Postscript by Clarence
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Clarence finishes the tale of the Connecticut Yankee. He recounts how, soon after the end of... (full context)
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...Hank is on the verge of going out to try and broker a truce when Clarence catches Merlin casting a spell that will put him to sleep for 1,300 years. He... (full context)
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Clarence reports that “The Boss” sleeps like a stone and that the remaining forces are giving... (full context)